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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/subturriundertow1967bost 



sub turri '67 

BOSTON COLLEGE* CHESTNUT HILL • MASSACHUSETTS 



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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / JAMES M. PETERS, JR. 

BUSINESS MANAGER / JOHN J. NANNICELLI, JR. 

MANAGING EDITOR / PATRICIA-LOUISE HANNA 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR / JOHN J. LAMBERT, JR. 



MCMLXVII 
Published by Pembrooke Company, Inc. at Boston, Massachusetts. 



table of contents 



prologue 4 

academics 47 

underclass 79 

activities 1 23 

sports 1 69 

features 225 

graduates 265 



prologue 



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They come to the Heights from many different high schools, from all 
across the country, each bringing a different background and perspective 
to Boston College. When they leave, they will enter other fields of en- 
deavor, but their experience will have been enriched, their perspective 
will have been changed. 

They probably first heard the word "college" spoken when they were 
still in the cradle, too young to understand what it would mean to them. 
Then it was just the wonder and hope of parents, now it is an individual's 
reality. In grade school, they did not think much of higher education, ig- 









norant that it was necessary for the careers they lightly dreamed of — doc- 
tor, teacher, nurse, or President of the United States. While in high school, 
they realized, or at least their parents did, that they should seek more 
learning. And so they came. 

For these students, as well as those that preceded and those that will 
follow them, Boston College is a major experience in their lives. Into this 
melting pot of academics and society, the individual student blends his 
individuality. Yet there are no stereotypes. Each student is affected by his 
college experience in a singular way and no two emerge alike from the 




process. The influence of the University is small in some of the students, 
but for the majority, it is a major force in shaping their lives. 

Students emerge from Boston College with the tools and the outlook 
to assume responsible positions in the world. Many will use the knowl- 
edge acquired on the Heights as a foundation for graduate work in med- 
icine, law, or further education in their major field. None of them will ever 
forget Boston College. 

The Boston College student is, and does, many things. He is nominated 
Scholar of the College, and he flunks a freshman math course. He is an 





avid disciple of Barry Goldwater, and he fights to establish S D.S. on 
campus. He comes from Nigeria, San Francisco, or Chestnut Hill, He will 
go into his father's business, and he will become a famous novelist or 
artist. 

There are many things that the Boston College student does not like 
about the University. He would like the core curriculum limited to include 
fewer required courses which would be presented by means of a broad 
interdisciplinary approach. He would like the tuition lowered. He would 
like them to do something with the dust bowl. But let anyone attack B.C. 



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and he will leap to its defense. Though within its society he may find more 
to criticize than to praise, without he is loyal and proud of his alma mater. 
Most students on the Heights are concerned about the world they are 
living in and will help to form. Many have committed themselves to the 
social, political, religious, and service organizations on campus to pro- 
vide themselves with a forum for their ideas and a framework for con- 
structive activity. Many more are more generally committed to such ideals 
and will actively work for them in later life. So that they might aid them- 
selves and others, our students strive to become more knowledgeable and 










mature in every possible way. They are interested and curious in the class- 
room, open-minded in their dealings with fellow students, and sincere in 
their desire to learn. 

It is impossible to generalize about the typical Boston College student. 
He simply does not exist. If he did, this institution would have failed as a 
university. College, in the best sense, was never designed to turn out 
assembly line products. For every one who will fit a neat category, there 
are a thousand that cannot be classified. Besides, no one will ever act as a 
typical B.C. student, but as an individual, and that is as it should be. 






11 



These young men and women were probably more alike upon entering 
the University than they will be upon leaving it. For in the interim, much 
in them has developed. They have become more mature, more sophisti- 
cated, more complex. They have become individuals rather than members 
of a type. They have learned much — from their teachers, from their studies, 
and, perhaps most of all, from their association with the other individuals 
that make up the Boston College community. 





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12 



Their knowledge of scholastic philosophy and modern languages will 
perhaps be dulled and slip away during the years after graduation. The 
nanne and course of their favorite teacher will perhaps even be forgotten. 
There will be no further contact with the members of the bull session 
groups. But all of these will have gone into making the person that moves 
on from Boston College and makes his way in the world. Later in life, if an 
honest summation were to be made, they would have to point back to the 
Heights and admit, "A great deal of me was created at Boston College." 





13 







15 






16 





17 



In the past four years, Boston College has undergone 
a major and far reaching academic evolution. Admittedly, 
progress was made in previous years, but it came neither 
as swiftly nor as sweepingly as the changes that have 
been recently witnessed. This evolution has created ef- 
fective structures in which the momentum of progress 
will be maintained far into the future, bringing new im- 
provements to make Boston College more vital and more 
modern than ever before. 

The Centennial Celebration four years ago marked the 



end of a century of birth and growth, and promised greater 
things for the years to come. Now a mature and estab- 
lished institution turned from a nostalgic remembrance 
of things past to a dynamic determination to create an 
even better university. The first step toward creative evo- 
lution was taken by the College of Arts and Sciences with 
the initiation of its self-study program. This internal criti- 
cism, which bettered its curriculum and revitalized its 
philosophy of education, was soon seen to produce sig- 
nificant results. Core courses were reduced in number 




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18 



and strengthened in value. The College sought new and 
excellent teachers, while the tendency toward inbreeding 
was eliminated. We can recognize the present Super 
Committee and its goals as stemming from this incentive 
to furnish constructive criticism and better our academic 
life. 

The two most conservative elements on campus, the 
Departments of Theology and Philosophy, were reformed 
under the inspired leadership of Reverends William Leo- 
nard and Joseph Flanagan, S.J. Dr. David Neiman, a 



Jewish rabbi. Dr. Mary Daly, a lay woman, and Dr. Her- 
mann Schussler, a Lutheran minister, were added to the 
Theology faculty. The Philosophy Department now offers 
such courses as Zen Buddhism, Arabian Philosophy, and 
Contemporary Atheism. 

The University Catalogue listsa great number of courses 
that were not presented just four years ago. In that short 
span of time, the Speech Department, under Dr. John 
Lawton, has evolved from virtual nonexistence into one 
of the strongest and most active departments on campus. 







19 



with courses in theater arts, group dynamics, and radio 
and television. In 1963 the School of Education intro- 
duced a Special Education major designed to train stu- 
dents for the teaching of the mentally retarded child. In 
Arts and Sciences, The Honors Program initiated and 
then expanded "Modern Man: The Cultural Tradition," a 
course which cut across departmental lines and fulfilled 
core requirements. 

In the fall of 1965, a special group of commuting stu- 
dents arrived at Boston College — the scholastics from 



Weston College. This was a result of Weston's own self- 
study which decided that their future priests would bene- 
fit from the more diverse academic potential available 
at B.C. These young men have been very successfully 
assimilated into the academic community and their in- 
tellectual curiosity clearly re-emphasizes the type of stu- 
dents that now populate the Heights. 

The quality of the student attracted and accepted by 
Boston College has risen significantly in recent years, and 
consequently, this new student has helped in the forma- 




20 



tion of the University just as much as it has contributed 
to his formation. Critical analysis, questioning, and in- 
dividual judgment have replaced passive acceptance of 
material in the classroom. There is a more meaningful 
dialogue between the student and the professor. Creativ- 
ity and freedom of scholarship is encouraged. The stu- 
dent is more vocal and his voice is heard and, with ever 
increasing frequency, heeded. 

We have witnessed a great academic revolution at 
B.C., but the effects of this change will not be totally felt 



during our lifetime. These effects will radiate from the 
Heights to be absorbed and appreciated by all those who 
have any contact with Boston College, either the Univer- 
sity, the students, or the graduates. The last four years 
have not seen an end to the academic problems of the 
University, or even of each individual college, but a be- 
ginning has been made. We have witnessed a dynamic 
transformation whose products will long outlive the proc- 
esses which made them. 

In keeping with its ever constant drive for "strength in 






21 



excellence," Boston College has undergone continuous 
transformation. One of the most obvious indications of 
this has been, of course, the expansion of its physical 
plant. The University has recently added a faculty center, 
a science center, three dormitories, expanded library fa- 
cilities, and has begun construction of a social sciences 
center. 

The new biology and physics center, Higgins Hall, has 
been referred to by Reverend Michael P. Walsh as the 
building that "will enable the University to move toward 



greater accomplishments and fuller participation in the 
dramatic expansion of scientific knowledge and research 
in our present day society." 

In addition to the usual assortment of classroom, offi- 
ces, and seminar rooms, the building also contains spe- 
cial animal rooms, constant temperature rooms, a green- 
house, and a closed circuit television system. 

The new Carney Faculty Center provides long needed 
office space for the University's ever increasing faculty. 
Departmental personnel are now gathered under one 





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22 



convenient roof — a tremendous improvement over pre- 
vious, decentralized, haphazard facilities. Its functional 
design which includes well lighted, air conditioned class- 
rooms and offices make for an atmosphere most condu- 
cive to study and work and are greatly appreciated by 
students and faculty alike 

The center serves as a memorial to Andrew Carney, 
the man who helped to make the University possible 
more than one hundred years ago by providing Reverend 
John Bapst, S.J. with half the funds required for com- 



mencing the operation of the college. 

The expansion of the University's library facilities is 
perhaps the most important factor of all for students and 
faculty specifically and for B.C. academic reputation in 
general. 

The quality of the University library system is reflected 
by the large proportion of B.C. students who continue 
their studies on the graduate level. Containing more than 
650,000 volumes, the system is constantly increasing in 
size. This year alone it acquired 28,000 new volumes. 






23 



Greater efforts are required however, as each and every 
still frustrated student will vouch. As a result, a part of its 
gigantic development program will include the construc- 
tion of a new campus library to help solve the problem. 
The new library will be a consolidated library which will 
be completely accessible to all members of the University 
community and adequate to meet the needs of students 
on all levels. 

In addition, three new men's dormitories also contrib- 
ute to B.C.'s new look. These dormitories provide in- 
creased recreational facilities which include pool tables. 



ping pong tables, T.V. sets and weightlifting equipment. 
The students' rooms also have larger desk areas and bet- 
ter lighting and heating. This increase in on campus 
housing functions as a source of unity by allowing the 
male student to become a more involved member in the 
B.C. community. 

Similar accommodations are still merely a dream for 
B.C.'s women students. While senior women students 
may now live in approved apartments, the rest of the 
women residents are forced to continue under less than 
ideal conditions. 





24 



The aim of Jesuit higher education is the development of the well- 
rounded individual, physically as well as intellectually. In accordance with 
this goal, Boston College annually participates in numerous intercollegiate 
athletic activities and conducts a comprehensive intramural program. The 
schedules for both include all those sports normally classified as major 
and a large number of minor ones too. 





25 



Of all the major sports, the one that has developed the most is, unques- 
tionably, basketball. Formerly ignored by the majority of the students and 
alumni, the roundball game is now one of the most popular on campus. 
Student support has been crystallized with the formation of the Courtside 
Club, and additional bleachers have had to be built to accommodate the 
many new fans. In four seasons under its dynamic Coach Cousy, the team 
has been invited to three successive post-season tournaments, culminat- 
ing in this year's very respectable showing in the N.C.C.A. eastern region- 
als. Once a mediocre quintet, the Boston College basketball team is now 
a national power. 







26 



Under Coach John "Snooks" Kelley. the hockey team continued its 
traditional role as one of the East's consistently outstanding sextets. Play- 
ing before capacity crowds and nnaking the playoffs every year, the Eagles 
won the ECAC title two years ago and finished that season ranked second 
in the nation. Last year Coach Kelley chalked up his four hundredth victory 
in intercollegiate competition, a record unmatched by any other coach in 
the country. There has been no change in hockey — Boston College ex- 
celled as always. 














27 



The fortunes in football were not quite as good. Many outstanding 
individuals brought glory to themselves but the same cannot be said of 
the team. Insufficient depth and frequent injuries to key personnel ham- 
pered Coach Miller's elevens and they never lived up to expectations. One 
result was that interest in the sport has waned considerably in the last 
two years. 





28 



The completion of the Jack Ryder Memorial Track in the spring of 1 965 
focused attention anew on the college's superior track team. Never a 
squad noted for its depth, the Eagles consistently came through with fine 
individual performances, particularly in the field events. The highlight of 
the past four years came last year when, despite the competition of sev- 
eral excellent opponents, the team captured the coveted New England title. 






29 



Much like the hockey team, the baseball squad continued to be one of 
the area's powerhouses. Coach Pelligrini's charges have always been 
prime contenders for the Greater Boston crown and the team competed in 
the New England regional tournament on many different occasions. Per- 
sonnel turned over but the winning tradition remained. 




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30 



As is probably normal, most of the apparent change in the athletic 
climate of the campus came in the area of the minor sports. The wrestling 
team, for one, was just getting started four years ago and interest in the 
sport was certainly not overwhelming. Coach Maloney's squads have per- 
formed quite creditably since that time, winning most of their matches 
and doing well in the area championships. Attendance in Roberts has in- 
creased accordingly and more candidates come out for this excitirtg sport 
each year. 







31 



The soccer team's history is another rags-to-riches story. Organized by 
interested students and financed by contributions from several campus 
groups, the sport operated on a club basis for its first few seasons. After 
piling up an impressive record and after winning the support of a large 
segment of the student body, the team received official recognition just 
this past year. It also ended its first season on the University's newly com- 
pleted soccer field. 





32 



Expansion was also evident in many other sports. With 
better performers participating in more contests than was 
ever the case before, both the golf and the skiing teams 
received greater notoriety and support. The same was 
true for the tennis club which, with the new courts and a 
vastly improved squad, has been promised official recog- 
nition in the upcoming year. And it looks as if lacrosse 
has also acquired a following of its own. 

For those students interested m the major sports but 



unable to compete on the varsity level, the intramural pro- 
gram remained the center of attention. In basketball, soft- 
ball, football, and hockey, competition was conducted in 
both day and dorm leagues; and the completion of the 
new basketball courts and baseball diamonds meant that 
even more students could participate. In this area of 
athletics then, as in so many others, there has been 
marked growth in terms of facilities, athletic ability, and 
perhaps most importantly, student interest. 






33 



One of the primary obligations of every expanding university is the pro- 
vision of decent facilities for the development of intellectual and social 
facilities. Important as this development is inside the classroom, it is of 
perhaps greater importance outside it. The good university sponsors num- 
erous cultural events in attempting to serve its community properly. In the 
past four years, Boston College has taken many steps to more adequately 
meet this obligation. 

The major change in social activities on the Heights has probably been 
best characterized by the shift in emphasis from popular music and dances 







34 



to more diversified forms of entertainment. Folk music, comedy, and jazz 
are now more popular than ever before. Performers like Alan King, Astrud 
Gilberto, Evelyn Cataldi, Dave Brubeck, and Tom Rush have joined the 
ranks of people like Little Anthony and the Lovin' Spoonful as favorites of 
the student body. 

If diversity has characterized social development on campus, greater 
maturity has marked the advance in cultural activities. In every conceiva- 
ble field, new heights have been attained by people trying to acquaint 
themselves with "the best that has been said and known in the world". 







35 



Music, theater, art, the humanities — all fields have been expanded in what 
has sometimes been called Boston College's "cultural revolution." And 
more than anyone else, the student has symbolized this change in B.C.'s 
cultural atmosphere. 

Theater, for one, has reached new levels of proficiency. Drama, comedy 
or musical, one-act play or five-act, the Dramatics Society has been equal 
to every challenge. With its recent production of Little Mary Sunshine, the 
D.S. achieved a peak of perfection rarely encountered at Boston College 
previously. Much the same can be said of Camelot, the Junior Class play 







36 



of 1967. Independent productions like The Fantasticks and Stop the 
World-I Want to Get Off further contributed to the development of pro- 
fessionalism in the theater arts on campus. 

Musically, the situation is very similar as many noted performers have 
visited the Heights for the first time. Such people as classical guitarist 
Alirio Diaz, harpist Grainne Yeats, and the New England and low/a String 
Quartets thrilled audiences with their skills just as Jesus Maria Sanroma 
and the Boston Pops have done so often m the past. As always, the Hu- 
manities Series sponsored many of these attractions; but other groups 






i 



37 



like the Arts and Sciences' Student Senate, its Honors Progrann, and the 
English Department have contributed ever more frequently in an attempt 
to bring great music to the University. 

Paralleling this development were the achievements of the University 
Chorale as a significant artistic group. Undaunted by any type of music, 
the students in the Chorale performed works by Berlioz, Weill, Mendels- 
sohn, MousSorgsky, Bernstein, and our own C. Alexander Peloquin to 
name just a few, with a competence remarkable for a college group. The 
appearance of many renowned soloists, particularly Eileen Farrell and 
Jean Maderia, and their accompaniment by entire festival orchestras fur- 




38 



ther enhanced the Chorale's artistic status. 

As for art and the humanities, the change has been less dramatic; both 
continued the excellent traditions established over many past years. The 
one notable difference was the greater emphasis on individual creativity 
spurred by the presence of two distinguished gentlemen, Mr. Allison 
Macomber, the artist-in-residence, and Mr. Sean O'Faolain, the writer-in- 
residence. The annual spring exhibition of the works of Mr. Macomber's 
students probably epitomizes this general shift in attitude better than any- 
thing else. In these two fields as in every other, there have been develop- 
ment and growth. 




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39 





40 



The Council of Resident Men has also made significant innovations. 
Mixers have been conducted in the Eagles Nest Snack Bar, lounge parties 
have been arranged in the dorms and the weekend movie schedule has 
been expanded — all under CORM's steadily increasing influence. Its most 
successful achievement though, was the establishment of Middle Earth, 
the Boston College coffeehouse. Owned by the Council and operated 
under a work-study grant from the Federal Government, Middle Earth 
offers a wide variety of programs from rock and roll to poetry readings 
and has become immensely popular with the University at large. 





41 



Socially and culturally then, Boston College has witnessed great 
change — change for the better both in scope and in attitudes. Hopefully, 
the realization of the proposed Social Commission which would co-ordi- 
nate all campus social activities and provide those organizations spon- 
soring events with cheaper and more effective means of securing talent, 
as well as the recommendations of the sub-committees on Student Well- 
Being, Student Government, Student Activities of the Committee on 
Student Life and Super Committee, will result in further improvement. 






42 



The student on the Boston College campus also turns 
to God. Reflecting Vatican Ms stress upon the individual 
in contrast to the institutionalization of the Church, re- 
ligious practices both on campus and off have adapted 
themselves to the many faces of the student. Hence, the 
decision to make a retreat is a completely personal and 
voluntary one now. Plans for a central University chapel 
have been abandoned in favor of small oratories where 
the Mass comes to the student in a more meaningful 
manner. The music of today's generation is heard at these 
student Masses. Guitars are the acceptable mode of ac- 



companiment and several varieties of folk Masses are 
now concelebrated at various sites on campus as well as 
in the girls' dormitories. Midnight Masses are also of- 
fered for the convenience of the student body. 

With this new emphasis upon the individual within the 
Christian community has evolved a student who more 
freely discusses his faith with regard to both its theoreti- 
cal aspects and its practical application — a student who 
seeks to rethink in a new light those tenets which he only 
mechanically accepted until this time in his life. For him, 
religion does not end on Sunday or with the closing bell 




43 



of theology class — it only begins there. Thus, it is no 
longer unusual to encounter discussions of various 
aspects of faith in McElroy among students or between 
students and a faculty member. Through the office of 
Reverend John Gallagher S.J., Spiritual Director for the 
University, the student has been given the opportunity 
to participate in formal discussions of this nature and 
to seek individual counsel. 

The woman student has also become an integral part 
of this program. On several weeknights, she is able to 
contribute to discussions on topics which range from 



a philosophical approach to love, death, and Christian 
commitment, to more concrete issues such as ecumen- 
ism, the changing forces in the Church, marriage, divorce, 
and birth control, with such young Jesuits as Father Bill 
Callahan, Father Ed O'Flaherty, Father Frank Doyle, and 
Father Pat Cahalan. Toward the end of this year she was 
introduced to the singing, guitar-playing duo from Wes- 
ton, Dick Eisemman and Don Monerieff, who devoted 
themselves to making the Mass come to life as well as 
to stimulating discussion of a dialectic nature. 






44 



The spirit of ecumenism on campus has been evi- 
denced by participation in interfaith conferences. IViany 
of these have been sponsored by the Men's Sodality. To- 
ward the end of the 1967 Lenten season, another group 
of students commemorated our Jewish heritage with a 
Paschal Supper. 

And many a B.C. student is now serving Christ and 
mankind in various forms of apostolic work — from teach- 
ing C.C.D. classes to spending a summer or number of 
years in home or foreign missions. 





45 



The religious aspect of the student's life was also 
deemed an innportant part of the University self-study 
program which occurred during the second semester of 
this year. Here, the student banded together with his 
faculty and administration to seek improvement in his re- 
ligious development in addition to his social, intellectual, 
and cultural advancement. He saw a definite need for a 
Christian renewal to begin here and through his influence, 
spread to his own generation. He sought a permanent 
Religious Activities Program to help him achieve this 
aim. His interest has been then in the spiritual as it will 
effect his life and that of his children some day. 




46 



academics 



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Very Reverend Michael P. Walsh. S.J- 
President 



48 



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Rev. Lawrence A. Dorr, S.J. 
Executive Assistant to the President 



university administration 




Rev. W. Seavey Joyce, S.J. 
Vice President of tlie University 




49 



Rev. Charles F Donovan, S.J. 
Academic Vice President 




Rev. Francis B. McWlanus, S.J. 
Secretary of the University 




50 



Rev. Thomas Fleming, SJ. 
Financial Vice President and Treasurer 




Rev. Edmond D.Walsh, S.J. 
Director of Admissions 




51 



Rev. John F. Fitzgerald. S.J. 
Registrar of the University 




Rev.JohnE. Murphy, S.J. 
Business IVIanager 




52 



Rev. Brendan C. Connolly, S.J. 
Director of Libraries 




Rev. Edward J. Hanrahan. S,J. 
Director of Resident Students 



Rev. George L. Drury, S.J. 
Director of Student Personnel Service 





53 



college of arts and sciences 



RevJohnR, Willis, S.J. 
Dean 




HenryJ.McMahon 
Assistant Dean 




54 



college of business administration 



Christopher J. Flynn, Jr. 
Assistant Dean 



Rev. Alfred J. Jolson.SJ, 
Acting Dean 





55 



school of education 





JohnF.Travers 
Acting Associate Dean 




56 



school of nursing 



RitaP. Kelleher, R.N.M.Ed, 
Dean 




Pauline R. Sampson, RN, M.Ed. 
Administrative Assistant to the Dean 



evening college 




Rev. Charles M. Crowley, S.J. 
Dean 




57 




"The experience of others is a safe light to 
walk by, and he is not rash who expects success 
in the future by the same means which secured it 
in the past. " 

The application of such a maxim to education 
requires that a teacher not only provide the light 
— that is, to instruct, but to be the light — that is, 
to make his own life the best example of what he 
is trying to teach his students. For this reason, the 
value of teachers such as Mr. Ermenegildo 
Alfano of the College of Business Administration 
is immeasurable. 

Mr. Alfano is an alumnus of Boston Latin 
School and one of the youngest graduates of 
Harvard University. Majoring in French and 
Italian, he completed his program of studies at 
twenty years of age, intending to enter the teach- 
ing profession. However, during the Depression 
he had spent four years working to defray college 
expenses and felt he should begin his career in a 
more financially profitable area of endeavor. He 
became interested in business and eventually 
graduated with a Master's Degree from Harvard 
Graduate School of Business Administration. He 
then embarked upon a career in the business 
world, spending eighteen years with a Boston de- 
partment store and gaining experience in every 
aspect of the retail business — from a general 
apprenticeship position to divisional merchandise 
manager of foods and home furnishings. 

This direct contact with the consumer ceased 
when Mr. Alfano purchased a pet food canning 
corporation which he continued to operate until 
the land was taken by the state under the Law of 
Eminent Domain. He then sold the physical 
assets of the company and retained only the 
marketing activities. After five years, he sold the 
marketing activities to concentrate on the finan- 
cial control of the business. 

Mr. Alfano then discovered that he had a great 
deal of extra time on his hands. Disliking this in- 
activity, he entered the banking business. He and 
seventeen others opened the Milton Bank and 
Trust Company of which he is presently Vice- 
president. 



Throughout the years he spent in business 
however, Mr. Alfano never completely lost sight 
of his pre-graduate school teaching ambitions. 
Yet, after so many years in a seemingly unrelated 
field, he was unsure of two things — whether he 
was capable of teaching and whether he would 
enjoy teaching. "I had to enjoy it," says Mr. 
Alfano, "for after a business career, I certainly 
was not thinking of teaching for its financial 
benefits." Thus, he accepted a part-time position 
at Regis College teaching courses in retailing and 
management. He received affirmative answers to 
the questions concerning capability and enjoy- 
ment and thus continued for two years at Regis 
before becoming a member of the Boston College 
faculty. 

His first few years at Boston College were 
spent teaching the principles of marketing and 
the business policy course of which he is now 
director. According to Mr. Alfano's students, 
colleagues, and superiors, his business policy 
course is probably one of the most beneficial 
courses to be had at the College of Business Ad- 
ministration. Based upon the case method, each 
class a panel of three students directs the class 
in complete student participation. These sessions 
are conducted in a manner similar to professional 
business conferences. This is a required course 




for seniors in all of the five majors. Its aim is to 
integrate at a practical level all the areas of busi- 
ness taught at the school. 

Mr. Alfano was recently given permission to 
conduct an experimental business policy course 
next year. For this course twenty seniors, repre- 
senting an even distribution of the five majors, 
will meet in one three hour session per week to 
discuss in conference the cases similar to those 
used by the Harvard School of Business. They are 
more detailed than those currently in use at 



58 




Boston College and Professor Alfano intends to 
give them intensified coverage. He feels that this 
is valuable training for any future businessman. 
"Thinking and making decisions is the function 
of the man in business, " claims Mr. Alfano. "To- 
day, computers take care of the bulk of the factual 
information. We mustteach our students primarily 
how to handle this information — to think and 
make decisions and this is what the present and 
also next year's experimental policy courses are 
designed to do." 

Undoubtedly, the same qualities that con- 
tributed to Mr. Alfano's success in the business 
world were also largely responsible for his similar 
success in the teaching profession — namely 
his ability to understand other people well and to 
instill in them optimism and self-confidence. Al- 
though he does not occupy an official advisory 
position, these qualifications have frequently en- 
couraged students to seek his counsel. This is not 
a new role for him, however. Besides being a 
father and grandfather for twelve years, he and 
his wife were active in the Milton Youth Club, a 
recreational organization for young people be- 
tween fifteen and nineteen years of age. 

In his leisure time, Mr. Alfano enthusiastically 
pursues an avid interest in golf, finding it not only 
relaxing, but definitely beneficial to the establish- 



ment and maintenance of good business rela- 
tions. He and his wife have traveled extensively 
throughout the country visiting nearly all of the 
states. They are planning a long awaited trip to 
Europe this June. 

Mr. Alfano is generally in favor of most of the 
changes that have occurred at Boston College in 
the past few years. He approves of the reduction 
in philosophy and theology requirements, since it 
creates a better balance in the curriculum. He 
feels that girls have a right to be in schools other 
than Nursing and Education and that they have 
the ability to contribute something beneficial to 
nearly any type of class. Concerning the recently 
introduced "cut" system, Mr. Alfano possesses 
mixed feelings. He favors the system as a long- 
term experiment, but believes that the numerous 
aspects of the situation should be considered. 
Thorough consideration should be given to such 
matters as parental transfer of responsibility and 
admission standards. He also noted the necessity 
for consistency in faculty reaction to the system. 
There should either be no penalty or a standard 
penalty for cutting classes. Such a policy should 
be agreed upon and enforced by all teachers in 
order to properly evaluate the success or failure 
of a "cut" system. 

Mr. Alfano is a perceptive, understanding, and 
stimulating member of the Boston College fac- 
ulty. From a full, active, and successful business 
career he turned to that which he felt would be a 
greater means of fulfillment: and as a result, he 
has increased his value to both the business 
world and the teaching profession. 








It is exactly eleven o'clock on a wintry Tues- 
day nnorning in a classroom in Carney — a class 
in Mt. 023A, Intermediate Calculus. Professor 
Augustus Fabens rushes into the room, immedi- 
ately removes his sport coat and places it on top 
of the hot-air ventilator, and opens his class 
with, "Are there any questions?" It reminds one 
of the old show business cliche: "The band has 
arrived — let the show begin " Everyone is there; 
one hundred per cent attendance is normal. His 
students feel that they really cannot afford to 
cut. Besides, who would want to miss the per- 
formance of B.C.'s most energetic lecturer? He 
assumes any position while speaking; he literally 
attacks the blackboard; sometimes he stares at 
the ceiling while groping for an answer. He will 
talk about anything. He is dramatic. 

Professor Fabens has an educational back- 
ground almost as varied as his teaching methods. 
A physics major as an undergraduate at Harvard, 
he went on to Stanford to study statistics, but 
completed his stay with a Ph.D. in the field of 
mathematics. He has since published at least a 
half-dozen significant papers on Probability (with 
such titles as "The Maximum-Sojourn Distribu- 
tion for a Semi-Markov Process"), and is cur- 
rently considered to be the only "professional 
probabilist" on the B.C. faculty. 



His teaching, prior to his arrival at B.C. three 
short years ago, took him to such "far out" places 
as Dartmouth and the Australian National Uni- 
versity. Dr. Fabens' description of the Australian 
collegiate system, most important for its British 
philosophy of education, reveals his own concept 
of the nature of education. He makes two major 
points in analyzing the system. First, "Once you 
have chosen your major, you have absolutely no 
choice of courses. You are told what to take the 
rest of the way " And second, "Once you have 
chosen to study one thing, you take nothing 
else." 

The general assumption underlying this system 
is that the college student actually needs no 
"broadening." He has been well exposed to 
academic pursuits unrelated to his major while 
he was in high school. The professor comments; 
"Their high schools are no better than ours. It's 
all a lie — just not true." What is expected of 
the college student in Australia is that he learn a 
specific number of concepts and facts; if you 
know the degree a man holds, you should be able 
to estimate almost exactly what facts he has 
acquired. Dr. Fabens considers this philosophy 
too narrow in terms of today's cultural demands. 

He does not "believe in" memorizing theorems 
or simply learning how to apply previously 
acquired formulas. This is not what mathematics 
is, nor what anyone should try to make it. The 
British-Australian system is too limited. Every 
man who is well educated should be acquainted 
with movements in fields other than his own. The 
mathematician must read more than papers on 
probability theory; he should also read social 
science journals, physics papers, newsmagazines, 
and the best recent novels. His students often 
comment that Dr. Fabens has a remarkable 
ability to digress from mathematical topics into 
seemingly unrelated fields, and yet keep the dis- 
cussion in proper perspective at all times. He 
manipulates ideas as quickly and as fascinatingly 
as he moves himself from door to window to 
desk to blackboard. He modestly admits that he 
tries to keep abreast of the current events in all 
the intellectual disciplines. 



60 





Mathematics itself is, "in essence, a way of 
thinking. All the different subjects are primarily 
just examples of that, though the specific facts, 
theorems, and concepts in each are valuable in 
themselves. But the way they tie together, the 
common thread, that is the thing we call mathe- 
matics." 

The courses in the Mathematics Department 
reinforce each other. Most are introductory 
courses; for instance, the whole of the Calculus 
series could probably be considered one quite 
elegant introduction. The specific course is not 
the important thing. One of Dr. Fabens' students 
has speculated that he tries to inculcate a "math- 
ematician's intuition" in every member of the 
class. Proving theorems is more important than 
using them. The objective is the liberation of the 
student from the limits imposed by practical ap- 
plication and attempts to visualize dimensions. 
Dr. Fabens forces every class member to think; i1 
is a demanding experience. After all, mathe- 
matics is in essence, "a way of thinking." 

This year the professor has taught only under- 
graduate courses; Intermediate and Advanced 
Calculus, and a course in Probability. He enjoys 
switching courses and teaching different types of 
students. They all interest him a great deal — 
even the non-math majors. "Teaching, in general, 
is often a hard and discouraging thing. Only oc- 
casionally are there rewards, like working with 
some bright people in the classroom, and know- 
ing that you can be satisfied with how you have 
taught someone. There are bright people in the 
humanities as well as in mathematics. ' 

"Gus " Fabens is as interesting to his students 
as they are to him. He skips from place to place 
in the textbook, spending two weeks on two 
pages and then two days on twenty. He insists on 
referring to theory — an unnerving experience for 
many. He presents all the "trivial" and the "ob- 
vious" proofs, which are often obvious only to 
him; it demands concentration. His testing meth- 
ods are somewhat peculiar. The students never 
see anything on an exam which they have seen 
before; there are no questions where all that is 
necessary for the correct answer is plugging 



numbers into a formula. His method of grading is 
also disturbing to many. "Gus" has a frustrating 
passion for deducting a considerable number of 
points for little, seemingly unimportant mistakes. 
Typical class averages might range in the forties 
or fifties through most of the semester; thus, 
each member is encouraged to work harder for 
that final grade. However, many will admit that 
despite the time and effort spent, the possibility 
of a low grade does not lessen their enjoyment 
of his classes, simply because they are such a 
challenge. 

Professor Fabens offers some interesting views 
concerning the betterment of Boston College. He 
feels that the university has witnessed a vast im- 
provement already. "Each class of students that 
comes in is better than the last. B.C. is definitely 
better each academic year. The real reason is that 
they are consciously trying to be better. You have 
to try hard these days to keep from improving, as 
more and better students apply for entrance, and 
more top teachers become available. But in addi- 
tion, B.C. is trying even harder." He finds that the 
administration has worked especially hard for the 
students, seeking outstanding professors who 
will not sacrifice the welfare of the students for 
their own research pursuits. Certainly, Dr. Fabens 
is in this category. 




61 



Enter the lounge in Cheverus Hall at eleven 
thirty any Saturday night and you are struck by 
the abnormally large number of people gathered 
together there. Forty or fifty students in that par- 
ticular place, at that particular time is certainly 
an unexpected sight. Yet, by midnight, four or 
five hundred more will have somehow or other 
squeezed their way into that excessively crowded 
room. No famous lecturer is speaking, no enter- 
tainment is being staged. These people are here 
for one reason and one reason alone, to assist at 
Mass. 

Since the beginning of the Second Vatican 
Council, the Catholic Church has been experi- 
encing an "aggiornamento", an updating of past 
practices and traditions. As a Catholic institution 
of higher learning, Boston College has been un- 
dergoing a similar evolution in every phase. The 
midnight Masses now celebrated every Saturday 
night and on the eves of holy days is just one 
manifestation of this process of change here on 
the Heights; but it is a dramatic and welcome 
one. The man solely responsible for its inception, 
one of the leaders of both the religious and aca- 
demic "aggiornamento" at Boston College, is the 
popular Assistant Professor of Theology in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, the Reverend 
Robert T. Ferrick, S.J. 

A native of Rhode Island and a graduate of 
LaSalle Academy in Providence, Father received 
both his Bachelor and Master of Arts Degrees in 
Theology at Boston College. His other degrees, 
the Licentiate of Philosophy and the Licentiate 
of Sacred Theology, were earned at Weston Col- 
lege. Education has been Father's whole life, tak- 



62 





ing him to all parts of the globe as both teacher 
and student. His regency saw him in Iraq, teach- 
ing English at Baghdad College; subsequent 
studies brought him to the Gregorian Institute in 
Rome and the Franciscan School of Biblical 
Theology in Jerusalem. Father Ferrick is currently 
in his sixth year as a theology professor at Bos- 
ton College, although these years have not been 
consecutive. Just one year ago. Father was 
awarded a scholarship by the Brown University 
Department of Religious Studies for further the- 
ological study under the renowned Father Mc- 
Nally, S.J. of Fordham University and the Union 
Theological School in New York, 

Father Ferrick has many interests aside from 
the subject he teaches. For relaxation, he enjoys 
listening to music, especially the works of such 
great composers as Beethoven. But he is also an 
addict of the Broadway musical. Rodgers and 
Hammerstein are especially appealing to Father 
— he often quotes them in his sermons, and a 
statue of the "Man of La Mancha ' currently 
stands on his desk. Then too, when the oppor- 
tunity presents itself, this engaging priest enjoys 
"just plain walking." According to Father, nothing 
is quite so refreshing as a peaceful stroll by the 
seashore, although he has been known to settle 
for a circuit of the reservoir every now and then. 

But the main interest in Father's life is still his 
freshman theology course. This past year he 
taught four sections of the standard "Promise 
and Fulfillment ", but with some innovations. With 
the assistance of Scholastics from Weston, each 
class was occasionally divided into small discus- 
sion groups to encourage more interest and par- 
ticipation by the individual student. The principal 
text was, of course, the Bible, but the edition was 
an ecumenical one according to the belief that 
Scripture "will make us one some day." Further 
readings included recent works of special rele- 
vance to the topics under consideration. The in- 
structor and material combined to make this 
course one that most freshmen found both chal- 
lenging and arresting. 

In addition to his duties as a member of the 
faculty, Father Ferrick is involved in numerous 
extracurricular activities both here at Boston Col- 
lege as well as off-campus. Foremost among 
these is his position as a Senior Counselor in 
Roncalli Hall. Whenever Father is in his room, his 
door is always open to those in his charge. In 



order to become better acquainted with these 
students. Father has instituted the practice of 
having ten fellows into his roonn once a week for 
informal discussions on whatever topics interest 
them. The results, in terms of corridor rapport, 
have been astonishing — a fact made obvious 
merely by a visit to Roncalli. 

Father is also moderator of the Gold Key So- 
ciety, the university-wide service organization. 
Under his leadership, this body has increased in 
membership to well over four hundred students, 
and is one of the three largest organizations on 
campus. More activities than ever before now 
come under its aegis. As moderator. Father Fer- 
rick has advocated two major revisions in the so- 
ciety — increased senior participation and in- 
creased off-campus activity. In regard to the 




former. Father has encouraged a more dynamic 
Senior Senate working through increased com- 
mittee activity: as for the latter, he has encour- 
aged programs like the Gold Key's current policy 
of inviting children from the Perkins School for 
the Blind to one home football game each fall. 
Future plans call for the annual presentation of 
an outstanding achievement award to some 
citizen of the Boston area in order to further 
improve Boston College's town and gown rela- 
tionship. This idea is just one more indication 
of the growth the Gold Key Society has experi- 
enced under the leadership of Father Robert T. 
Ferrick. 

The new Executive Committee for Student 
Affairs and the Spiritual Life Committee both 
afford Father still other opportunities to demon- 
strate his lively concern for the student's religious 
life. But more than any other single event, the 
midnight Mass Father Ferrick initiated has 
demonstrated the thoughtful understanding this 
priest has of the spiritual needs of his flock. Stu- 
dent response to the Mass has been so over- 



whelming that one local radio station has even 
expressed interest in the possibility of broad- 
casting from Cheverus Lounge. The friendly, in- 
formal atmosphere, the folk hymns sung, and the 
active participation of all those assisting com- 
bine to make this weekly occurrence a unique 
religious experience for all. 

Questioned as to the recent history of the The- 
ology Department, Father speaks of the many 
favorable changes he has witnessed. Of these, 
the most significant have been those affecting 
the department's staff and those related to the 
courses offered. Once composed solely of Jesuits, 
the Theology Department now includes many 
laymen, both Catholic and non-Catholic, and 
even one female professor. As for the policy of 
allowing seniors a choice of courses. Father has 
nothing but praise. He regards the addition of 
electives such as Professor Neiman's "Jewish 
History " as one of very definite benefit, and looks 
forward to the day when all of the university's 
students will be able to choose the theology 
courses they desire. 

As for the future. Father Ferrick envisions still 
greater change. One he himself would like to see 
is the institution of an advanced placement test 
in theology for incoming freshmen. Since many 
high school students take courses roughly similar 
to those now offered in the first year, unnecessary 
duplication would be avoided. Another of Father's 
ambitious projects calls for a three day study 
period, rather like a retreat, in which all facets 
of university life would be discussed. Similar in 
purpose to the meeting held at Round Hill last 
year, this new forum would be run solely by lay- 
men — perhaps the Gold Key Society — in an at- 
tempt to facilitate communication among all the 
university's groups. 

Father Robert T. Ferrick is thus a vibrant man 
vitally interested in everything around him. Eager 
to give retreats or address an interfaith gathering, 
he is equally at home in the classroom or the pul- 
pit, a student's room or a faculty lounge. An in- 
tegral part of the "aggiornamento" the university 
is now undergoing, the talents of this remarkable 
priest extend to every aspect of life at Boston 
College. 



''?T2r^, 




Three years ago the Philosophy Department of 
Boston College had no doctoral program; today 
there is one. Three years ago most students took 
required courses in that department and very few, 
if any, electives; today they choose from a wide 
variety of electives covering many different fields. 
One man was responsible for both these changes, 
the man to whom the Heights gave its "Man of 
the Year" award one year ago in recognition of 




his outstanding achievements. This man is, of 
course, the ebullient and progressive Chairman 
of the Philosophy Department, the Reverend 
Joseph F. X. Flanagan, S. J. 

A visit to Father Flanagan's office provides a 
good indication of what the man himself is like. 
The walls are decorated with modernistic paint- 
ings, many religious in tone; the desk is clear ex- 
cept for a pile of letters lying neatly in the lower 
right hand corner and a stack of uncorrected 
theses diametrically opposite. Were it not for the 
hockey equipment placed discreetly behind the 
file cabinet, the overall effect would be one of 
quiet efficiency. As it is, there is something both 
refreshing and dynamic about this equipment's 
peculiar presence. Unique is probably the best 
word to describe the room's atmosphere and it is 
probably the best word to describe its occupant. 
For Father Flanagan is one of those uniquely 
well-rounded individuals one hears so much 
about but meets so very infrequently. 

The war interrupted many young men's educa- 
tion, and Father's was no exception. He studied 




one year at Boston College, two and a half years 
at Brown University, and was finally awarded his 
Bachelor of Arts Degree from Boston College 
while studying at the Jesuit seminary in Weston. 
Father's Master of Arts was also earned at Bos- 
ton College and his Doctor of Dental Surgery 
from Washington University in St. Louis. His final 
degree is, of course, the Licentiate of Sacred The- 
ology, obtained from Weston College. 

Since assuming the chairmanship of the Phi- 
losophy Department, Father Flanagan haseffected 
numerous changes. In the first place, the number 
of required courses has been drastically reduced 
and the number of available electives consider- 
ably increased. This increase has made it possible 
for both the students and the teachers to empha- 
size those fields which most interest them, and 
student response has been very enthusiastic. The 
fact that more than five hundred undergraduates 
chose at least one course in the department this 
past year is ample evidence of this fact. But even 
more important has been the institution of the 
department's doctoral program. Excellent stu- 
dents of philosophy can now be recruited on both 
the graduate and undergraduate levels. In two 
short years, the number of philosophy majors in 
the College of Arts and Sciences has soared from 
twenty to sixty-six. 

At the present time. Father Flanagan teaches 
two sections of the Philosophical Anthropology 
course with which he had had so much success 
in the past. This course, a study of the evolution 
and processes of human consciousness, empha- 
sizes Father Bernard Lonergan's highly regarded 
Insight but also relies on extensive outside read- 
ing. Last semester Father also offered a new 
elective entitled the "Philosophy of History", de- 
scribed by the Boston College Bulletin as the 
examination of the "(m)ethod and purpose of 
man's knowledge of the past, patterns of ex- 
planation used by historians and the aims of his- 
torical inquiry." Its principal texts were Insight. 



64 



Collingwood's The Idea of History, the philosophy 
of history of Arnold Toynbee, and the Study of 
Man of Michael Polanyi. Both courses incorporate 
stimulating subject matter with interesting read- 
ing material. 

But, as is the case with most excellent courses, 
it is the professor who makes these classes the 
worthwhile experiences they are. Father Flana- 
gan's teaching method is different from what one 




usually encounters at Boston College. As he him- 
self said, "My main interest in the classroom is 
to get people to think for themselves." It is a 
process of "self-appropriation, a development of 
'critical power', a reaching out for more than the 
student now understands," an arrival at insight, if 
you will. In order to accomplish this objective, the 
affable priest poses a series of questions through 
which the student gradually attains knowledge. 
It is not an easy process of learning, but is cer- 
tainly a thought provoking and an illuminating 
one. The picture of this tall, determined priest — 
his long fingers outstretched as if to mold stu- 
dents' minds as a sculptor would a statue; his 
visage intense until, with some great insight on a 
young philosopher's part, it breaks into a charm- 
ing, boyish grin — this is a picture that few of 
Father's students are ever likely to forget. 

When asked about the university. Father Flana- 
gan invariably discusses its maturation. "The big 
change has been in the society of the students: 
three years ago they were more homogeneous . . . 
now they're more diversified." The word that ap- 
parently characterizes them more than any other 
is "idealistic." Students have become more criti- 
cal, not only of the administration (through such 
organs as the student newspaper), but also of 
themselves and each other. Political and intellec- 
tual indifference on this campus has been sup- 
planted by an "aggressive and critical quality of 
the students' minds " This freshness and vitality, 
this eagerness for change, this "critical power" 
that Father attempts to elicit in his own course 
he attributes to an earlier adolescence in the 
American society, an earlier awareness of the 
"social surd, the composite of failure which needs 
to be corrected." 



As for the university in general, it too is under- 
going a process of growth, of intellectual mat- 
uration. There is a new sophistication here at 
Boston College, even to the point where there is 
a growing problem of overspecialization. Father 
sees the "Modern Man" series as one attempt to 
solve this particular difficulty, the policy of allow- 
ing more students a double major as another. 

In regard to the future. Father Flanagan says: 
"What will change the university most is the in- 
crease in the senior professors coming in as 
Boston College expands and puts more effort 
into graduate programs rather than the already 
excellent undergraduate studies." In his own de- 
partment, the institution of the aforementioned 
doctoral program and its subsequent approval by 
the National Defense Educational Association has 
meant increased financial aid and the ability to 
attract more top students. This expansion of the 
graduate programs will make possible many ex- 
cellent courses previously unavailable to under- 
graduates, and will provide them with the oppor- 
tunity to obtain first hand advice from some of 
the best students in their fields. 

No description of Father Flanagan would be 
complete without some mention of his many and 
diverse interests. A lover of music and art. Father 
prefers modern composers like Bartok to the 
more traditional ones and enjoys visiting art gal- 
leries whenever the opportunity arises — espe- 
cially those in New York. A devotee of foreign 
films, his favorite directors are Antonioni, Fellini, 
and Ingmar Bergman, as anyone who has ever 
been in one of his classes can testify. Also a 
sports enthusiast. Father plays wing on the fac- 
ulty hockey team and can usually be seen at any 
home hockey or basketball game rooting the 
Eagles on to victory. 

This then, is the Reverend Joseph F. X. Flan- 
agan, S.J., one of those uniquely well-rounded 
individuals one hears so much about but meets 
so very infrequently. 





65 



One of the most disheartening experiences for 
a Boston College English major is to be waiting 
near the head of the English Department pre- 
registration line when the Chairman announces, 
"English 133 and 134 are filled." Every spring 
these courses are among the first to be closed. 
They are both taught by Dr. Richard E. Hughes. 




Perhaps this fact, more than any other, best in- 
dicates the populanty and esteem that Dr. Hughes 
enjoys among students. His classes are acclaimed 
as "a real experience" and "the kind of thinking 
I came to college for." He quietly enters the room, 
head downcast, not a note in his hand, and pro- 
ceeds to a free-wheeling lecture — explication- 
discussion that is inevitably coherent, usually ex- 
citingly creative, and always interesting. 

It is a refreshing change from the normal dead, 
dry note-taking experiences that students have 
seen far too much of — , and they love it. Dr. 
Hughes's fascinating classroom technique grows 
out of his concept of "the classroom as the major 
laboratory of scholarship, the place where you 
actually explore the validity of new ideas." And to 
the amazement of those who thought it must take 
great planning. Dr. Hughes continues, "Really 
when I walk into class I haven't the foggiest idea 
what I'm going to do. Unless something spon- 



taneous happens, unless something honest-to- 
God gets born, then we're back to exchanging 
facts and we might as well quit." 

After graduating from Siena College in 1949, 
Dr. Hughes first came to Boston College. He was 
not Dr. Hughes at all then, just a young college 
graduate who had decided, for lack of any cer- 
tainty in career plans, to take a year of graduate 
English. But the young man fell into the hands of 
Professors Duhamel and Hirsh who beckoned him 
on to Academia. By September of 1950, he had 
pocketed his master's from BC and was working 
on a doctorate at the University of Wisconsin, 
concentrating on the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries. 

The fall semester of 1953 found Mr. (still) 
Hughes teaching at Ohio State University, while 
he completed his dissertation on Dryden and 
Pope and the sense of the ridiculous. In 1954 
Wisconsin conferred the Ph.D. It was now Dr. 
Hughes. 

Dr. Duhamel helped bring his former student 
back to Boston College in 1956. In 1958. he 
"divided up the Renaissance" with Dr. Duhamel 
and began teaching the material with which stu- 
dents now associate him — the metaphysicals 
and particularly John Donne. 

The following year. Dr. Hughes began a three- 
year tour as Chairman of the English Department. 
During this period. Dr. Hughes teamed with Dr. 
Duhamel to work on a series of books designed 



66 





to "demonstrate that classical rhetoric is a viable 
study in the contemporary world." In 1962 they 
published Rhetoric, in '63 Persuasive Prose, in 
'64 Literature: Form and Function, in '65 Princi- 
ples of Rhetoric, and this year a wholly new edi- 
tion of Rhetoric. This will probably be the end of 
the series. Dr. Hughes feels that the glamour of it 
has worn off: "Well, we've done that bit, and now 
we're each moving on to something else " 

In Dr. Hughes's case, the something else is his 
book on Donne. It has been long expected by his 
students. Unlike any of the present critical treat- 
ments of Donne, Dr. Hughes's book will be an at- 
tempt to look at the entire canon, and through 
this explore the mind of Donne. 

There is something about Donne, or at least 
the way Dr. Hughes talks about Donne, that has 
fascinated nearly all of the students who have 
ever heard him speak of that poet-satirist-ser- 
monist-and-whatever. Sometimes in a particu- 
larly well-donne-class, one can't be sure if it is 
Hughes or Donne talking and if you are sure, you 
are not really sure that it makes a difference. 
There is something about the two men, but Dr. 
Hughes says that his approach is "not to infuse 
Donne into the experience of students, but rather 
to get the students to enter into the personality 
and world of John Donne. And if the excitement 
develops, it works because Donne is a very com- 
pelling figure, a fascinating mind " Students 
come to realize that the seventeenth century, as 
expenenced by a sensitive and intelligent mind, 
is not at all alien. 

Another side of the friendly, yet unassuming 
scholar is the social and family side. This is an 
aspect of Dr. Hughes that students seldom have 
an opportunity to see, which is a matter of real 
regret to him. Dr. Hughes and his wife. Gay, (and 
five young children) live in a large old Greek Re- 
vival home in Sherbourne. They enjoy tennis. 
Baroque music, and "any and all theater. " Dr. and 
Mrs. Hughes have made it a tradition to have a 



group of seniors out to their home in May for an 
evening of plain and simple good fun. "But it's 
unfortunate," Dr. Hughes says, "that young 
scholars and their professors haven"t worked out 
some way of getting the community together on 
a regular basis."' 

On the subject of students and the great 
changes that have occurred at BC since his ar- 
rival, Dr. Hughes is very pleased. "When I came 
here B.C. was a self-satisfied, insular four-year 
community college existing around strap-hangers 
and bologna sandwiches. We've always had a 
wide spectrum of professorial talents, but the 
most exciting change has been in the student 
body. Everything else, building programs and the 
rest, are secondary and unimportant. These stu- 
dents are — pardon a cliche or two — impatient 
with mediocrity, more absorbent of diverse ex- 
periences, more conscious of themselves as 
carnal intellect, (more aware of the excitement of 
being young and healthy and at the same time, 
more excited with ideas), and are convinced that 
all the pat formulas of yesterday are gone. We 
professors have to learn to recognize their points 
of view or were dead." 

By his students he is most admired as the 
perfect scholar, professor, and friend. 




67 




Excellence in the field of education, as in any 
other field of endeavor, demands that the indi- 
vidual strive to improve, by continually reevaluat- 
ing himself and his work. In this respect, the 
School of Education at Boston College is indeed 
fortunate to have as a member of its faculty 
Sister Josephina, of the Sisters of St. Joseph, 
who has for years dedicated herself to this pursuit 
of excellence in the teaching profession. 

Sister's preparation for her role as a teacher 
began at Mount Saint Joseph Teachers College 
in Buffalo, New York. While there. Sister became 
involved not only in her studies as a social science 
major but in various extracurricular activities such 
as glee club and dramatics. "I do have a little bit 
of the ham in me, " Sister quips. At Boston 
College, she received a Master's Degree in ad- 
ministration and supervision and a Doctorate in 
psychology and measurement, writing her dis- 
sertation on the gifted child. 

Sister utilized her strong educational back- 
ground by becoming a classroom teacher, then 
supervisor of all schools in the Boston arch- 
diocese (over one hundred in all), and finally, 
teacher and counselor at B.C.'s School of Educa- 
tion. She has been on the Boston College faculty 
since 1948, teaching a multitude of courses at 
both the graduate and undergraduate levels. This 
past year she conducted courses in Methods and 
Materials of Teaching in the Elementary School, 
Psychometrics, and also an elementary reading 
seminar. 

The fact that Sister Josephina has never been 
content with being only a good classroom teacher 



has long been realized by her peers and superiors. 
Recognizing her superior intellect and her deep 
concern for the philosophical and psychological 
aspects of her profession, they have awarded her 
various grants and research positions, confident 
that she would very capably further the aims of 
the profession. 

In 1961, Sister received Boston College's 
faculty fellowship. On this grant, she toured Eu- 
rope for the purpose of studying the Montessori 
method of education. After extensive research in 
ten different countries. Sister returned to estab- 
lish a modified Montessori classroom at Boston 
College which was in operation until 1964. As a 
result. Sister Josephina is now considered to be 
one of the foremost authorities on this method of 
learning. 

She was also the first member of the Boston 
College faculty to receive a Cooperative Research 
Grant from the Department of Health, Education, 
and Welfare. Through this, she performed an ex- 
perimental study of the "Influence of the In- 
dividual Versus Group Instruction on Spatial 
Abilities in the Pre-school Child." In 1963, the 
Cambridge School of Business awarded her a 
citation for the preparation of teachers for public 
schools. That same year, she was also inducted 
as an honorary member of the Alpha and Omega 
Honor Society of Boston College. In 1965, she 
received an honorary L.L.D. Degree from Regis 
College. 

In recent years. Sister's knowledge and experi- 
ence in the field of Education has become in- 
creasingly more renowned. Last year, she was 
elected to serve for three years on the executive 
board of the National Council of Teachers of Eng- 
lish. She performed her first official task last fall 
by attending their conference in Houston, Texas. 

Sister's extensive knowledge of the many and 
varied aspects of teaching has prompted her to 
write more than eighty articles for numerous pro- 
fessional publications. After much research on 
the teaching of spelling. Sister had published two 
spellers for grades two through eight — Word 
Power Through Spelling, and Spell Correctly. 

Although a teacher's record of professional 
achievements is of a great importance in evalua- 
ting her mark in the educational world, the per- 
sonal characteristics of the individual, her tastes, 
her outside interests, and the degree to which she 
pursues these, contribute in a very great degree 
to her success as a teacher. 

Sister Josephina scores high in this respect. It 
is difficult to understand exactly how she man- 
ages to participate in so many professional activi- 
ties so well, and still maintain an enthusiastic 



68 



interest in so many nonprofessional areas. One 
look into her office on the third floor of Campion 
Hall is enough to reveal Sister as a uniquely fasci- 
nating person as well as educator. From the cold 
businesslike office space allotted her, she has 
created a warm, friendly atmosphere with softly 
colored curtains, carpets. Hummel knick knacks, 
and pictures — all with a very feminine touch. 
"My office is really my home," she says, "so why 
not make it look like one!" On the bulletin board 
outside the office, she has a display of Madonna 
paintings which have been famous for centuries. 
Sister possesses a deep appreciation for these 
artistic masterpieces and declares that she never 
misses an opportunity to visit the various mu- 
seums in her travels throughout the world. 





Sister feels that the "cut" system provides the 
students with a freedom they deserve. However, 
she does not consider this too great an issue in a 
student's education. A student will not usually 
cut unless there is a good reason. She believes 
that, in many instances, it is the professor's re- 
sponsibility to eliminate these reasons by con- 
ducting classes which the students find educa- 
tionally profitable. This new policy has created no 
problem in any of Sister's classes; she finds the 
incidents of cuts very low. 

Such liberal policies, including the permission 
of alcoholic beverages in the dormitories, are 
necessary freedoms, she claims. "Within bounds, 
the individual must be given certain responsibil- 
ities and rights to exercise his free will " 

Regarding the question of the admittance of 
women students to the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, Sister was hesitant to answer. If a girl 
wishes to become a teacher. Sister maintains 
that her place is in the School of Education where 
specialized courses, direction, and philosophies 
are provided for her. Yet if a young woman wishes 
to enter a non-teaching field, she should have the 
right to become a candidate for a liberal arts de- 
gree. 

For any student, male or female, interested in 
the teaching profession, probably one of the most 
informative, enriching, and rewarding experi- 
ences is an association with Sister Josephina, a 
person who has truly achieved excellence as a 
student of education, as a teacher of education, 
and as a human being. 



When asked her opinion of the current changes 
being enacted at Boston College, Sister's answer 
reflected a great respect for today's students as 
conscientious, responsible individuals deserving 
of the best a college has to offer. The presence 
of this type of student, she believes entails a de- 
gree of change in administrative policy if Boston 
College is to make progress as an institution of 
higher learning claiming to prepare young men 
and women to become intelligent members of 
society. 

She considers the recently reduced number of 
required philosophy and theology courses bene- 
ficial to the student only if it provides a more 
"well-rounded curriculum ". Such modifications in 
the curriculum are necessary for the demands of 
today's world. However, she believes that these 
courses do have a definite place in one's educa- 
tional preparation, and that they should be in- 
tegrated into and applied to other courses and to 
life in general. 




69 




\ 







Miss Eileen Ryan Is a teacher in the School 
of Nursing; but unlike most teachers, she spends 
comparatively little time in the classroom. Lectur- 
ing is only a small — a very small — part of her 
job. Most of her time is spent in the clinic, the 
hospital, or — while here at the Heights — in re- 
search conferences. 

The one course with which Miss Ryan is asso- 
ciated is medical-surgical nursing, an intensive 
program for sophomore nursing students. It is de- 
signed to prepare them for comprehensive care 
of the adult patient. There are fourteen faculty 
members who rotate classroom instruction, at- 
tempting to integrate concepts like nutrition, in- 
terpersonal relations, use of drugs, and pathology. 
Miss Ryan's two blocks of classroom instruction 
are concerned with respiratory diseases and the 
care of the neurological patient; in addition to 
these lecture blocks, she can be called on through- 
out the year for spot lectures on related topics. 
The whole system is remarkably flexible since the 
blocks can be arranged in many orders. Because 
of this flexibility. Miss Ryan taught approximately 
only six class hours during the entire first semester. 

The medical-surgical experience is a powerful 
tool for combining the theoretical with the prac- 
tical aspects of nursing. Just as important as the 
classroom instruction is the two and one half 
days per week which the sophomores spend in 
actual clinical work over a period of thirty weeks. 
The hospital is the course's "laboratory" in which 
"we manage experience through assignments to 
patients with specific nursing problems." Be- 
cause of the very low eight to one student-teacher 
ratio for this course, each student receives a great 
deal of personal attention. 



Miss Ryan describes the learning process of 
B.C. nurses this way: "First, the students have 
worked at acquiring the fundamental nursing 
arts; for example, handling sterile equipment. 
During their first academic year, they have no 
association with actual patients. Medical-surgical 
nursing is their first chance for patient contact." 

There are approximately one hundred students 
who have completed her course this year. Miss 
Ryan comments on them: "Some come here with 
very little idea what nursing really is, some with 
a vague idea. Almost all are beginners, with no 
previous hospital experience, although there are 
exceptions." These are the young women who 
must be introduced to the hard facts of nursing 
practice, and Miss Ryan helps make the introduc- 
tion a success. 

She believes that if there has been any definite 
change in the type of girls entering the School of 
Nursing during her five years at B.C., it is very 
difficult to pinpoint. "Possibly they question more, 
are not so satisfied with accepting just what is 
given as being good. There is a growing trend to- 




wards intellectual curiosity." In particular, "the 
liberal arts is an area which the students them- 
selves would like very much to see strengthened, 
and so would we." But she points out that a great 
amount of practical nursing work is always neces- 
sary, and with the lack of sufficient time, some- 
thing must be sacrificed. Still, the curricula com- 
mittee "is continually examining the course 
curricula carefully." There is a great deal of 
change, especially when new clinical areas be- 
come available. 



70 



Such a change took place last year, when the 
School of Nursing made arrangements with St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital for some of the medical- 
surgical nursing students to do practical training 
there. Of each student's thirty weeks hospital 
work, twenty are spent at Boston City Hospital 
and the other ten at St. Elizabeths. The addition 
of "St. E's" makes possible a much wider scope 
of practical experience. For instance, there is 
much more ward service at Boston City than at 
St. Elizabeth's. Boston City has more accident 
cases and more cases with complications caused 
by alcohol. St. Elizabeth's is much smaller and 
handles more special cases. In short, the addition 
of another hospital allows the students to meet 
many more different problems and situations than 
before. 

Miss Ryan was in virtual retirement from the 
classroom for a large part of this past teaching 
year. In addition to her clinical work, she was de- 
voting a large amount of time to a nursing-faculty 
research project. The project, jointly conducted 
by the School of Nursing and the Sociology De- 
partment, is just completing the second of a pro- 
jected five year study. There have been nine 
members of the nursing school faculty meeting 
with Dr. Powell, a professor in the Sociology De- 
partment, for one full day every week. The proj- 
ect is examining the skills needed in nursing re- 
search; there are vast amounts of written material 
and data to which the ten researchers can refer, 
since sociologists have been carefully studying 
nurses for years. 

The aim of the project is to discover the "theory 
or base of nursing, what goes into the nursing act 
which distinguishes it from what the other health 
professions do. " Under very close analysis are 
the various approaches to the teaching of nursing 
which have been used in the past; for example, 
the "care-cure-coordination" schema presently 
"defining" what nursing is for instructional pur- 
poses. All the present definitions and concepts 
are being studied. 

Miss Ryan explains: "This is a question that 
the profession itself is struggling with — How can 
we best educate nurses for our changing so- 
ciety?" The results of the study may point the 
way to a changed system. Always, as also with 
the work of the School of Nursing Curricula Com- 
mittee, the question of most concern must be, "Is 
there another way of teaching this?" 

There is a related question; "What differenti- 
ates the levels of nursing?" All nurses take the 
same state board examination for their R.N. But 
not all of them have the same nursing education; 




their preparatory programs might be very different 
in length. For instance, Boston College provides 
four years of collegiate nursing education; St. 
Elizabeth's, from whose nursing school Miss 
Ryan herself graduated, has its own instruction, 
spread over a period of three years. The state 
boards make all nurses legally the same, but be- 
cause of the varying programs of nursing educa- 
tion, the question naturally arises, "Should there 
be any difference in the hospital as to the func- 
tion of those with different training?" This is a 
well-disputed question in the nursing profession 
at the present time; one which Miss Ryan and 
many other teachers and administrators are try- 
ing to answer. It is a knotty problem. 

With problems like these on her mind, in addi- 
tion to the daily cares of the teacher and the 
problems always besetting the nurse, it is some- 
thing of a slight miracle that Miss Ryan finds any 
extra time for trips to McHugh Forum: she is an 
enthusiastic Eagle hockey fan, with season's tick- 
ets for all the home games. But there are only 
twenty-four hours in each day, so she must miss 
many of those pre-Broadway theater openings 
she enjoys. 

Besides being a nurse and an instructor. Miss 
Ryan is a speculator as to the role of the School 
of Nursing. This is, after all, what that research 
project is all about. "There are a lot of changes 
going on now. Students are asking themselves. 
Am I in the best program?' We are asking our- 
selves. Are we offering the best program?' There 
is great flexibility here and the Curricula Commit- 
tee is constantly re-examining the courses we 
offer. But we are constantly being pressured by 
society: more nurses are always needed. Still, we 
are concerned with quality, despite the pressure 
for quantity." 



71 




The office number is 33 1 . It's just a little place, 
like all the Carney faculty cubicles. They are all 
simple places for complex, busy people. But 
maybe number 331 is different. 

Thefading sun pushes through the half-opened 
windows and dully lights the bookcases care- 
lessly stacked with tomes of many tongues. 
Wooden shelves beneath the windows grudg- 
ingly reveal their unbound papers: a neat pile of 
mimeographed sheets bearing a Moscow date- 
line — not in Russian script, but in some Romance 
language; a manuscript, now showing signs of 
wear: and several issues of a Madrid literary 
magazine, a sort of Spanish Figaro. 

Strange things hang upon the dull walls — not 
blazing modern art, not the sedate visage of 
some long-forgotten Church Father. Enframed 
papers, not enframed pictures, dot the walls — 
here, a Peace Corps Training Program diploma; 
there a "thank you" letter from some Italian cardi- 
nal-archbishop and a Harvard scholarship award. 

The blue name plate on the door tells you that 
this is the office of Professor Ernest Siciliano. 
Dr. Siciliano has been here much longer than his 
cosy room m Carney, much longer. Since 1939 
he has been a full-time teacher; from 1937 
through 1939, he was a teaching fellow while 
pursuing M.A. and Ph.D. studies at Harvard. That 
was after an A.B.-M.A. student career at B.C. 
The extra Master's Degree from Harvard provided 
him with the opportunity to win a traveling 
scholarship for study in Spain. He won the prize 
all right, but Generalissimo Franco was busy 
winning a bigger prize. So, the traveling schol- 
arship led to no travel. 

Professor Siciliano teaches Spanish. He also 
teaches about Spanish life, literature, and his- 
tory. There is the elementary course, in the basic 
31-32 class. But not just anyone takes Sp. 31- 



72 




32. It is elementary, but exclusive — designed es- 
pecially for modern-language majors who want a 
Spanish background in two not so easy lessons. 
At present, in a rather informal approach to 
grammar, fifteen dedicated beginners are learn- 
ing the 700 "active" vocabulary words, and even 
conversing a little in Spanish. This course, after 
all, is conversation-oriented, audio-lingually ap- 
proached, and . . . intensive. The students use an 
introductory text, just recently published, by one 
Ernest Siciliano. Maybe soon they will start read- 
ing and discussing in Spanish those mimeo- 
graphed newspaper and magazine articles of cur- 
rent interest. 

There is also the advanced undergraduate 
course entitled "Literature of the Golden Age." 
It is a survey of sixteenth and seventeenth cen- 
tury Spanish literature conducted in Spanish. Its 
topic is the historical and cultural Golden Age, 
seen through the lives and writings of her most 
precocious children, Cervantes and Calderon. 

The Doctor does not like to take himself or his 
material too seriously. Merely to provide infor- 
mation is something less than intellectually in- 
spiring; it must be palatable. Informal discussions 
"let us have a little fun in the classroom." Humor 
does have a place. 

In his two graduate school courses. Dr. Sicili- 
ano tries to give his students a deeper insight 
into Spanish literature through a most detailed 
study. His Cervantes course examines Cervantes 
the man, hisworkin general, and his great master- 
piece in particular. Classroom discussions are 
centered about the various interpretations of Don 
Quixote. The course on Calderon and the "Auto 
Sacramental" is very much like the Cervantes 
study, with "give and take" discussions on the 
works themselves and the various interpreta- 
tions, followed by analysis of the literary tech- 
nique of the dramatist. 

Professor Siciliano's introductory course is 
only in its second year as an intensive study for 
language majors. Except for the stronger motiva- 
tion of these students he has seen very few dif- 
ferences among Spanish students through the 
years. "The students are slightly better prepared 
in oral facility when they come to us from high 
school, but over all, no better. Something has to 
be sacrificed if the strictly oral approach is used, 
and that something is verb forms, grammar and 



so forth." Perhaps the classes "are starting to be 
better controlled," but this could easily be the re- 
sult of having only the better prepared and per- 
haps more ambitious language majors. As for his 
advanced and graduate students, the Professor 
sees no difference at all. The students come and 
go, only the teachers and the language remain 
much the same. Sometimes there is a shift in the 




teaching method; there might be more language 
labs, or mimeographed hand-outs, but the aim of 
the teaching game is ever the same, proficiency 
and literacy. 

There are always a few extra chores waiting 
for the industrious faculty member. In 1964 Dr. 
Siciliano directed the Spanish language training 
for fifty-two Peace Corps students here at B.C. 
He conducted intensive — three hours per day 
through four months — instruction and drill les- 
sons, as the volunteers prepared themselves for 
a community development project in Peru. There 
was one surprising result of the program. When it 
was all over the graduating students voted to 
give not just fifty-two but fifty-three training di- 
plomas. The fifty-third went to their language 
instructor. 

Then there was the little chore way back in 



1960. The Archbishop of Milan wanted to learn 
to speak some English. He learned quite a bit 
from an introductory course which included tapes 
planned and recorded by Siciliano. Back and 
forth, English dialogue and Italian instruction and 
finally, the then Cardinal Montini — now Pope 
Paul VI — acquired a basic speaking facility. For 
which effort, he wrote the letter expressing his 
gratitude that now hangs in Carney. 

In his spare time, there are always Spanish 
short stories to write. Earlier this year the pro- 
fessor had his first submission to a leading Ma- 
drid literary magazine published. He plans to sub- 
mit more of his work; until then, he is scouring 
the latest Spanish writing for ideas which could 
be developed. 




Carney 331 tells you a lot about its occupant 
— an easy resting place with room to chat at lei- 
sure with a man who tries not to take himself or 
his work "too seriously." That is his style — the 
quiet, mellow attitude he exhibits, which never 
completely conceals his scholarship. Only close 
observation reveals signs of the little extras upon 
which he works — signs like the Peace Corps di- 
ploma, or the Spanish literary magazines. You 
might have a talk with the graying little man, or 
even take a quick peek inside his green bookbag, 
if you can get it off his shoulder. 



73 




"The college student of today is continually ex- 
hibiting initiative, interest, and self-direction. The 
most beneficial classroom procedure for this type 
of person is one providing a high level of group 
participation and discussion with the teacher el- 
evated from the role of lecturer to that of guide 
and stimulator," claims Dr. John F. Travers Jr., 
the Boston College School of Education's new 
Acting Associate Dean 

This philosophy of the learning process is by 
no means new Yet until recently, it was rarely 
seen in American colleges and universities. The 
lecture method is an institution in the field of ed- 
ucation and by merit of that fact, it is difficult to 
modify or replace. Withthe repeated studies and 
reports of men such as Dr. Travers however, edu- 
cational leaders are realizing the need for new 
classroom methods that will effectively bring out 
the best in each student. For the most part, they 
are impressed by the success of seminar-type 
classes. 

Dr. Travers states that he tries never to lecture, 
but rather to lead and guide his class in discus- 
sions. His approach to teaching is through, not at 
the student. This is a fact that any of his students 
will readily verify. Those in his geography and 
psychology classes were pleased with the nu- 
merous opportunities he offered for self-expres- 
sion. Regardless of whether or not his own 
opinions coincided with theirs, he listened, gave 



thought to, and respected their points of view At 
the start of each period, they immediately real- 
ized that the success of the class depended upon 
them. "His classes," they claim, "are immensely 
stimulating". One senior elementary major who 
was in Dr. Travers' class two years ago com- 
mented, "His classes were real. Everything he 
said he backed up with his own fascinating ex- 
periences." "He's dynamic and personal," ex- 
claimed a junior girl. "He never forgets anyone's 
name." Most students agreed that his tests were 
difficult but very fair "The tests were obviously 
not designed to catch you but to gain an accurate 
estimation of how well you had learned to think 
about the subjects covered in class," one girl 
declared. 

Throughout his career. Dr. Travers has been 
extremely interested in the philosophy and psy- 
chology of the learning process, and has devoted 
a large part of his time to research in these fields. 
His first book. Learning: Analysis and Application 
was concerned chiefly with this subject. Funda- 
mentals in Educational Psychology, Dr. Travers' 
latest and as yet unpublished work, pursues the 
subject further, exploring its more practical appli- 
cations 

Dr. Travers, a lifetime resident of Arlington, 
Massachusetts, is a graduate of Boston College 
High School and Boston College where he earned 
a Bachelor's Degree in biology, a Master's De- 
gree in education and a Doctoral Degree in edu- 
cational psychology His doctoral thesis dealt 
with a study of juvenile delinquency. 

Before coming to Boston College, Dr. Travers 
taught for a few years in the Jamaica Plain-Rox- 
bury area. During his first years at Boston Col- 
lege, he taught primarily geography, educational 




psychology, and methods courses. His present 
position as Acting Associate Dean of Education 
encompasses a variety of duties ranging from ad- 
ministrative work to the more unofficial confer- 
ences with students. He does not like to consider 
himself an advisor, since he feels that he unfortu- 



nately does not have the time to devote to so de- 
manding an area: but many students after a fif- 
teen minute talk, leave his office encouraged by a 
greater confidence in their own abilities. 

During the first semester, Dr. Travers was on 
sabbatical. Under this program he spent a semes- 
ter off campus dedicated to research and publica- 
tion. He did most of his work at his home in Ar- 
lington. He, his wife, and their four children enjoyed 
this added time together, but his children, all un- 
der ten years of age, found it difficult to under- 
stand why their father was always at home 
studying. 

This is not the whole story, however. A man 
with Dr Travers' great interest in psychology and 
concern with practicality would find it impossible 
to divorce himself completely from the concrete 
situation Dr. Travers was on campus at least two 
days every week attending conferences, speaking 
at assemblies, and trying to create as close a re- 
lationship as possible with the students, who are 
his ultimate concern. He will frequently greet for- 
mer students who pass by his office by name and 
invite them in for a chat. They, in turn, are often 
amazed at the details he remembers about them 
and his interest in their current activities 

The atmosphere of Dr. Travers' office reflects 
well his strong family ties and his concern for 
close, personal contacts. On the left wall he has 
on display his children's school drawings. Pic- 
tures of his family are arrayed on his desk. He is 
very proud of the accomplishments of his chil- 
dren. His daughter, he claims, at ten years of age, 
is a poet It seems to be this encouraging, fatherly 
attitude combined with his willingness to be a 
classroom discussion leader rather than lecturer, 
that makes Dr Travers one of the most apprecia- 
ted and best loved teachers m the School of Ed- 
ucation 

During the summer, Dr. Travers participates m 
a Boston College graduate program at Wellesley 
High School. This is essentially an internship pro- 
gram which selects qualified graduates of four 
year colleges and universities who are interested 
in teaching yet possess no background in student 
teaching or specialized education courses. At 
Wellesley High School, they receive instruction 
and teaching experience under the direction of 
Dr Travers and the rest of the staff. 

Due to the great intellectual change he has 
witnessed in students since his undergraduate 
days, Dr Travers is in favor of corresponding 
changes taking place in the university's educa- 
tional policy. The reduction in philosophy and 
theology requirements he believes was neces- 
sary With the increased demand for specializa- 



tion and subsequent requirements for degrees 
beyond the Bachelor's level, a student needs a 
broad background in all subjects to qualify for 
graaudte school 

Dr. Travers' great confidence in the students of 
today and his respect for their earnestness in 
academic affairs leads him to believe the new 
class cutting policy significantly beneficial He 
maintains that the student should be allowed to 
accept responsibility; he need not be accountable 
to a professor for his absence from classes. He 
states, "I have noted littte difference in class at- 
tendance, anyhow. If there had been a significant 
drop in some classes, I believe it's most likely the 
fault of the teacher. I like the idea It keeps us on 
our toes." 

The question of more liberal policies in the 
dormitory situation he feels is dependent upon 
individual student reactions to the restriction lift- 
ing If the privileges are not flagrantly abused, 
and a certain amount of order is maintained, this 
new freedom is a good idea. 

It had been said that "Greatness is not in being 
strong, but in the right use of strength; and 
strength is not used rightly when it serves only to 
carry a man above his fellows for his own solitary 
glory. He is the greatest whose strength carries 
up the most hearts by the attraction of his own" 
Intellect alone will never define the great teacher 
A love of learning combined with a love and un- 
derstanding of mankind are together the deter- 
mining factors According to this definition. Dr. 
John Travers is truly on the road to greatness. 




75 



Physics is "a science that deals with matter 
and energy and their interactions in the fields of 
mechanics, acoustics, optics, heat, electricity, 
magnetism, radiation, atomic structure, and nu- 
clear phenomena." At Boston College, "the De- 
partment of Physics offers a major with a bal- 
anced program of classical and modern Physics. 
The sequence of courses, integrated with the ac- 
companying courses in mathematics, aims pri- 
marily at preparing the gifted student for gradu- 
ate study in Physics. At the same time, it endeavors 
to communicate to the student the basic theoret- 
ical and experimental techniques requisite for 
employment and advancement as a professional 
physicist." Currently in charge of the department 
is the man who has been Acting Chairman for the 
last several years, the very congenial and popu- 
lar Professor Frederick E. White. 

A native of Peabody, Massachusetts, Doctor 
White received his basic education in the Beverly 
School System. After earning his Bachelor of 
Arts Degree in mathematics at Boston University, 
he attended Brown University in Providence, 
Rhode Island, from which he was awarded his 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy De- 
grees in physics. Professor White joined the Bos- 
ton College faculty in 1936, and he and his wife 
presently reside in Beverly. 

This past year. Doctor White taught two courses 
to sophomore physics majors in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. These were "Mechanics II," a 
course which summarized the mechanics of par- 



76 





tides, systems, and rigid bodies while discussing 
moving coordinate systems and the equations of 
Lagrange and Hamilton: and "Electricity and 
Magnetism 11" which was described in the col- 
lege bulletin as a "thorough discussion of electric 
and magnetic fields in empty space and in ma- 
terial media, culminating in Maxwell's equations 
and the propagation of electromagnetic radia- 
tion." Required of all majors in their second year, 
both courses were designed to provide the nec- 
essary background for a more detailed study of 
the science. 

Under the leadership of this disarming gentle- 
man, the Physics Department at Boston College 
had been characterized by sweeping change. The 
most obvious indication of this fact was the com- 
pletion of Higgins Hall last year; but probably 
even more important to the student, was the total 
reorganization of the physics program. As a result 
of the recent self-study conducted by the College 
of Arts and Sciences, and in recognition of the 
better preparation of the incoming freshmen, it 
was decided to teach the general physics course 
in the first year and Doctor White's two compul- 
sory courses, in addition to two semesters of 
chemistry, in the second. In effect, this earlier 
completion of the basic courses means that it is 
now possible for the juniors and seniors to fulfill 
their yearly twelve credit requirement by electing 
more courses than was previously possible. 

Paralleling the revisions within the department 
have been changes in the structure of the courses 
themselves Almost universally, the topics dis- 
cussed are more advanced than was formerly the 
case, and some courses actually deal with totally 
different subject matter. As a result, the eighteen 
senior physics majors and the eighty to one hun- 
dred undergraduate majors have better, more 
comprehensive electives from which to choose. 

Returning to the subject of Higgins Hall, Doc- 
tor White naturally regards its completion as a 
milestone in the development of the sciences at 
Boston College — indeed, as the beginning of a 
new era. The fact that the Physics Department 
now has more than twice as much space as be- 
fore, more than sixty thousand square feet as op- 




posed to the twenty-five thousand it occupied in 
Devlin, means that intellectual as well as phys- 
ical expansion should become increasingly more 
evident within the next few years. Professor 
White looks forward to the aadition of many fine 
professors to complement the department's al- 
ready excellent faculty. This strengthening of the 
teaching staff, together with the greater auton- 
omy the department had enjoyed since the com- 
pletion of the Arts and Sciences self-study, should 
consequently produce an influx of topnotch 
physics students. Thus, at the graduate as well as 
the undergraduate levels, the presence of Higgins 
Hall will do much to enhance the future of the 
department. 

If there is one asset which Professor White 
possesses, both as an instructor and as an admin- 
istrator, it is orderliness. This phenomenal ability 
to have absolutely everything under control is 
clearly evident in everything the Professor does. 
Within memory. Doctor White has never been 
late for class. Then too, he is always extremely 
well prepared, both in delivering his daily lectures 
and in answering any questions his students may 
have. For their benefit, he always informs them of 
the class average, its mean, and their percentile 
rankings on any test, and is so thorough as to 
bring a wire basket to class with him whenever 
there are numerous homework assignments to 
collect. Most amazing of all though, is Doctor 
White's treatment of the seniors' graduate school 
applications. At times burdened with seven or 
eight of these lengthy forms from a single individ- 
ual, he nevertheless manages to complete and 
forward every one of them within two or three 
days of their reception. Matter, energy, and or- 
derliness are therefore some of the ingredients 
that make up the life of Professor Frederick E. 
White. 

Once off campus. Doctor White has numerous 
scholarly interests and activities with which to 
occupy his time. He is a member of a large num- 
ber of honorary and scientific societies including 
Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Pi Sigma, the national 
physics honor society. In addition, his work has 
been published in the American Journal of Physics, 



and he is currently an assistant editor of the Jour- 
nal of the Acoustical Society of America in which 
capacity he reviews the latest books published in 
this field. 

Acoustics has always been one of Doctor 
White's primary interests; it might even be called 
his hobby. Because of his knowledge in this area, 
he was stationed at Duke University for three 
years during World War II. Working with a num- 
ber of other scientists, he conducted research un- 
der the direction of the National Defense Re- 
search Committee in affiliation with the Army's 
base at Fort Bragg. The objective of the program 
was to devise new methods for detecting and 
pinpointing enemy artillery by means of acousti- 
cal devices. Today he is still interested in the 
field, which is evidenced by his willingness to 
discuss the acoustical problems encountered in 
any building, even Philharmonic Hall at the Lin- 
coln Center. 

One other notable achievement of Professor 
White was the television program recently con- 
ducted over WGBH-TV, Boston's educational 
station. Taped two years ago in conjunction with 
Harvard University, the program consisted of a 
series of lectures entitled, "Physics III" which 
was primarily devoted to the Polaris missile pro- 
gram and the physical principles involved. Har- 
vard students could receive credit for this course 
by watching Doctor White on Tuesday nights and 
subsequently doing related work in the classroom. 

As an administrator. Professor White has done 
much to strengthen both the fine undergraduate 
and the relatively new doctoral programs; as a 
teacher, he is remarkably lucid and informative; 
and as an advisor, he is always willing to take 
time from his very demanding schedule to offer 
help and advice to his students in the form of 
constructive criticism. For all these reasons then, 
Boston College is indeed fortunate to have on its 
faculty a man of the caliber of Doctor Frederick 
E.White 




"He who knows nothing, loves nothing. 
He who can do nothing understands nothing. 
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Paracelsus 



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activities 




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class officers 



A & S L to R. George Didden, Sec; William Durkin, Jr., Pies.; 
David T. Gay, V. Pres.; missing: Paul J. L. Hughes, Treas. 




C.B.A. L. to R. Dennis J. Reardon, Treas.; William E. Bates, Sec; 
William J. Zak, Pres.; Robert K. Doherty, V. Pres. 





12-4 



Education L. to R. Thomas Dillon, Pros.; Sal Mucci, Treas.; Sandi 
Polman. Sec; Bill Gilmore, V. Pres. 




Nursing L to R. Carol Diana, Sec: Pat Anton, Treas.: Joanne 
Folts, V. Pres.: Kathryn Gallagher, Pres. 




125 



Student government on the Boston College campus is 
no simple affair. The task of heading the highly complex 
organ belongs to the Campus Council which coordinates 
the activities of the four Student Senates and the four 
Interclass Councils, not to mention the Evening School 
Senate, the resident councils, and the newly established 
Commuters' Council. 

The Campus Council, now in its eighth year, controls 
many phases of University life. To it is relegated the re- 
sponsibility of evaluating and approving campus events 
and campus organizations — both old and new. This year's 



Council continued in the traditional position as chief gov- 
erning body, but relegated sponsorship of some social 
events to other campus organizations. 

As the University has grown, so have the Council's 
problems. In the course of many late meetings, it con- 
ducted a self-study to work out changes in its constitu- 
tion, election procedures, and structure. This year it found 
it necessary to appoint various committees and sub-com- 
mittees to investigate the areas which come under its 
sway. 

It also helped to organize the "Super Committee", the 







126 



campus-wide self-study program which probed all areas 
of the student's relation to the University, by working in 
conjunction with the Student Personnel Office. It also 
worked very closely with its advisor, Mr. J. Mclntyre, con- 
cerning such problems as the tuition increase, budgeting, 
and proposed changes in the academic calendar. 

Direct contact with the student body is maintained by 
the Student Senates in the individual schools. 

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the Senate con- 
cerns itself primarily with the academic phase of the stu- 
dent's collegiate career: so important is this role, that a 



totally distinct slate of officers deals with the school's 
social functions. Its Freshman Assistance Program has 
provided the opportunity for closer contact between new 
students and their junior and senior advisors: its tutorial 
service has functioned as an aid to the entire student 
population. The first A&S Course Evaluation and Critique 
was published in the spring to aid students in the election 
of courses for the next academic year. This year, the Sen- 
ate also concerned itself with such matters as the pro- 
posed change in the academic calendar and the admis- 
sion of women to the A&S student body. 







127 



The College of Business Administration endeavors 
through its Senate to honor professional businessmen 
and the ideals which they personify. Having published 
their own Course Critique this year, they also began a 
self-study program with the intention of achieving greater 
unity of action and purpose. Communication between the 
students and their representatives was aided by the in- 
creased role of the section representatives. The school's 
business-oriented clubs were also re-evaluated in the in- 
terest of student welfare. A movement was also initiated 
which, if effected, would place more power in the hands 



of the student body. And for the first time, the annual 
awards programs of the Senate and the business fraterni- 
ties were combined into a school-wide Senior Awards 
Banquet which honored the outstanding members of the 
graduating class. 

This year, the School of Education Senate made sev- 
eral advances. Also emphasizing greater communication 
between the student and the governing body, the Senate 
clarified the role of the section representatives and pro- 
vided for direct election by the student body of next 
years Interclass Council representatives. It also reorgan- 







128 



ized its tutoring program. Two major advances were 
made with the initiation of a lecture series and the selec- 
tion of two students to represent the voice of the stu- 
dents in the school's Educational Policies Commission. 

The Women's Council represents the School of Educa- 
tion's women. Serving as an advisory board to Dean of 
Women, Dr. Mary Kinnane, this year it again sponsored 
a lecture series which focused on the role of the woman. 
The group also held its annual Mother and Daughter 
Fashion Show. 

The Senate in the School of Nursing serves as a unify- 



ing force in the face of the nurses somewhat abnormal 
hospital schedules. The Senate is concerned with the 
social and spiritual aspects of the nurses' lives as well as 
the intellectual, and provides an effective Mason between 
the students and the administration. 

This year the graduate nurses and the basic nursing 
students worked as a group to make the graduate nurses 
an integral part of the University community. Thus, an 
R.N. Club was formed. Geared to the graduate nurses' 
special professional interests, it helps to bind the group 
together. 







129 



The School of Nursing Dormitory Council followed 
much the same program and co-sponsored several events 
with the other two resident councils. Their major concern 
this year was the perfection of the senior-prefect system 
and the establishment of Masses at Greycliff for the 
student nurses. 

The Commuters' Council is an organization which fills 
a long existing gap on the B.C. campus. Through its ef- 
forts, the commuting student has been able to participate 
more in University life. The problems of the day student 
have been studied and presented to the administration; 
social and educational activities have been sponsored 



The Senate's major activities for the year were the an- 
nual Winter Whirl and the Intercollegiate Council of Nurs- 
ing Day when students discussed the problems and prac- 
tices of today's nurses. The year's climax was a testimo- 
nial dinner held in March for their advisor. Reverend 
Edward J. Gorman, S.J. 

The fact that it is separated from the rest of the under- 
graduate community has not hindered the activity of the 
Evening College Senate. This year it continued the tradi- 
tional Halloween and Christmas parties. Once again, food 
baskets were distributed in order to enliven the holiday 
season for needy area families. Its activities were brought 






130 



to a close by the Senior Dinner Dance and the production 
of Fiorello which was staged in the early spring. 

The Interclass Councils are ordinarily composed of the 
elected officers of the four schools. This year, however, 
the A&S and Education Senates chose to delegate these 
p^osltions to the section representatives. The Councils 
interest themselves mainly with the social life of Boston 
College. 

The Senior Interclass Council worked throughout the 
year to organize Senior Week activities. This event, as 
well as the planning of Homecoming 66, formed the bulk 
of its activities. 



The resident councils worked closer together this year 
than ever before. 

The Council of Resident Men continued to sponsor its 
Orientation Week activities and mixers. They were also 
responsible for Winter Weekend, and this year also or- 
ganized a Resident Weekend. Their major claims to fame 
are the establishment of our coffeehouse. Middle Earth, 
and the granting of liquor privileges to dorm students of 
legal age. 

The School of Education Dormitory Council made re- 
markable strides by becoming a truly active organization 








131 



band 



Of all the student groups which claim to demonstrate 
true B.C. spirit, one group is heard above all the rest, and 
justly so — the Boston College Eagles Band. No matter 
what the outcome of any sporting event, the band is al- 
ways there For Boston. The precision marching of this 
fine unit at football games, its notorious impromptu 
chants and swinging solos at basketball and hockey 
events, are always a source of entertainment to both the 
athletes and the spectators. 





132 



In the past few years, the band has displayed its talents 
to even larger audiences while marching in such events 
as the local Columbus Day Parade and the St. Patrick's 
Day Parade in New York City. This year's group, in addi- 
tion to its usual duties, presented a Christmas Concert in 
the Lobby of McElroy Commons. 

The Boston College Eagles Band actually consists of 
four bands: Marching, Concert, Pep, and Dance. The lar- 



gest of these is the famous Eagles Marching Band which 
includes a drum major, a color guard, and a lovely major- 
ette. The newest member is the Eagles of Sound which 
performs at formal and semi-formal affairs throughout 
the year. 

Under the direction of Mr. Peter C. Siragusa, our versa- 
tile musicians contribute many hours to making collegiate 
life at B.C. the most high-spirited in the area. 



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133 



chorale 



One of the most vital contributors to the "cultural revo- 
lution" at Boston College is the University Chorale. Under 
the direction of Dr. C. Alexander Peloquin, a man of many 
musical dreams and deeds, the Chorale presents the Uni- 
versity with a series of annual concerts. 

Concerts of special interest from the immediate past 
include the performances of Vivaldi's Gloria. Bach's 
Magnificat in D, Benjamin Britten's Saint Nicholas can- 
tata, and Carl Orff's Carmina Burana. The highlight of 



University Chorale in concert. 





Chorale officers, 1967 



134 



the last year's concert season was a performance of Pou- 
lenc's Gloria, featuring Miss Eileen Farrell as guest solo- 
ist. Another notable occasion was the performance, by a 
group of men from the University Chorale, of the Festival 
Mass for the Quadricentennial Celebration of St. Augus- 
tine, Florida. The Mass and other works for the celebra- 
tion were composed by Dr. Peloquin. 

This year, the Christmas Concert on December 4, 
1966, included Bach's Cantata No. 140. and Part I of 



Handel's Messiah. The concert came to a close with the 
rousing Hallelujah Chorus. 

Following last year's precedent, the Chorale brought 
the grand opera to Boston College by presenting Bizet's 
Carmen in a concert performance with the renowned 
soloist. Miss Jean Madeira, and Nicholas di Virgilio of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company. 

To round out the year's performances, a program of 
American music was presented on May 6, 1967 for the 
annual Home Concert. 






135 



dramatic society 



In its 101st season, the Boston College Dramatics 
Society continued to present plays of artistic merit, 
designed to provide its members with an opportunity for 
creative expression and the development of theatrical 
skills. Under the leadership of its Executive Council and 
the direction of its faculty advisors. Dr. J. Paul Marcoux 
and Reverend Joseph Larkin, S.J., the Society began the 
year with a fine production of Christopher Fry's The 
Lady's Not For Burning. Directed by Dr. Marcoux, the 
play, situated by Fry in "the 15th century, either more 
or less exactly," treated, sometimes humorously. New 
England's attitude during its witch-trial days. 





136 



Immediately following this initial production, rehears- 
als began for the extremely successful musical comedy 
by Rick Besoyan, Little Mary Sunshine. Although Little 
Mary was the first musical attempted by the Dramatics 
Society, it was perhaps the most professional theatrical 
event ever presented on the B.C. campus. This commen- 
dation was duly justified in light of the raves it received 
from B.C. audiences and the sell-out crowds at the War 
Memorial Auditorium during the annual Boston Arts Fes- 
tival, Winterfest. 

In March the Society once again entertained audiences 



in the Campion Hall Auditorium. On this occasion, a night 
of student-directed one act plays including Jean Anouilh's 
Cecile, The Undertakers by John Hawes, and a sequence 
of scenes from the Thurber Carnival, reaffirmed the vari- 
ety of talents that exist within the Society's membership. 

As the finale of its 1 01 st season, the D.S. presented an 
evening of Eugene lonesco: The Lesson, and The Chairs. 

The quality of this year's productions are most assuredly 
an indication that an impressive year of dramatic enter- 
tainment will follow this most successful 66-67 season. 






137 



fraternities 



The Delta Eta chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, the first pro- 
fessional business fraternity in America, was established 
at B.C. in 1955. Its professional activities include tours 
of manufacturing plants and lectures on various business 
topics. For the benefit of the entire student body, it has 
sponsored surveys of major fields, electives, and graduate 
schools as well as an annual marriage lecture series. 
Upon graduation, the brothers are eligible to join alumni 
chapters which exist throughout the United States. 

Delta Kappa at B.C., a member of the International 
Fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi, is a professional commerce 






138 



and business administration fraternity dedicated to 
broadening its members' perspective of the business 
world. It augments the core curriculum of the business 
student, attempting to bring him closer to the actualiza- 
tion of his goals. 

Instituted at B.C. in 1966, Omega Alpha Psi seeks to 
enlighten its members regarding the opportunities in the 
business world that are available to the college graduate. 
Thus, it provides its members with a series of programs 



designed to offer assistance in choosing a field of con- 
centration and insights into the problems encountered by 
the novice in the business world. 

The B.C. chapter of Pi Sigma Epsilon was established 
in 1966 for those interested in the advancement of mar- 
keting, sales management, and selling as a profession. It 
attempts to stimulate in its members an interest in the 
most recent professional methods of selling and instill in 
them the highest possible ethical business standards. 






139 



bellarmine 



With the steadily increasing number of Boston College 
undergraduates contemplating political or legal careers 
in recent years, the Robert Bellarmine Law and Govern- 
ment Academy saw it necessary to improve both the 
quantity and quality of its service. In addition to their 
regular sponsorship of professional speakers, this year 
they also held a student forum. Comprised of eight stu- 
dents representing five major law schools, its purpose 
was to acquaint B.C. students with the demands of law 
school. Similar services including a newsletter and a li- 
brary of graduate school bulletins have also been insti- 
tuted by the Academy in its endeavor to serve the student. 







140 



1966-67 spelled success for the Fulton Debating So- 
ciety which is coached by Mr. James J. Linger and di- 
rected by Dr. John H . Lawton. 

First semester, the varsity earned fifth place at the 
Brandeis University Tournament, and finished ninth at 
the Georgetown Tournament. Second semester saw the 
team rise to fifth place in the Harvard University National 
Invitational Tournament, the largest meet of the year. The 
New England-New York Regional Tournament, the Na- 
tional Championships, and the Tournament of Champions, 
to which B.C. was the first invited, will finish the year. 



fulton 







4(|B,^'>- 





141 



gold key 



This year marked the thirtieth anniversary of the Gold 
Key Society, the University-wide service organization. 
Founded on October 12, 1937 under the direction of Mr. 
John Gately and formally organized the following year 
under the leadership of Reverend Joseph Maxwell, S.J. 
the Gold Key has grown from a band of ten men to its 
present enrollment of 450 members. Throughout the 
group's history, its students have exemplified the bond 
of unity which is embodied in its motto of "Service 
and Sacrifice". 

In service to the University and the community, the 







142 



Key assists in the B.C. sponsored Public Affairs Forum, 
Citizens' Seminars, Humanities Series Lectures, concerts, 
and athletic events. Its members also work with the 
underprivileged children at the Nazareth Child Center in 
Brookline, Massachusetts. 

This year's Society made tremendous strides in the 
area of the Key's government. Vast internal transition 
occurred with the strengthening of the Board of Gover- 
nors, increased legislative power for the Senior Senate, 
and the formation of a House of Representatives for 
undergraduate members. 

Senior Keyholders also assisted and supported other 



campus organizations by serving on the various com- 
mittees established for the evaluation and improvement 
of student life. 

The Society's fraternal aspect is fostered by a variety of 
intramural athletic, social, and religious events. To further 
strengthen the fraternal ties among its members, this year 
the Gold Key Senate established the Gold Key Scholar- 
ship in memory of David Spangler, whose life exemplified 
the ideals of the society. 

The best description of the Gold Key Society is — an 
organization dedicated to Alma Mater and community 
which engenders the Boston College spirit of excellence. 




Faculty Advisor, Robert T. Ferrick S.J. 





143 



honor societies 



"Ever to Excel" is the familiar Boston College motto 
and the achievement of this goal in the academic sphere 
is recognized on the Heights by the existence of several 
exclusive honor societies. Each year those students who 
have demonstrated the highest level of academic per- 
formance and service to the University are accepted into 
one of these elite groups. Though membership require- 
ments for each may differ, scholastic excellence is com- 
mon to all. 

There has been a Boston College chapter of Alpha Sig- 





ki^y .^a^ 




144 



ma Nu, the national Jesuit honor society, since 1939. 
Organized to honor those students who have distin- 
guished themselves in scholarship, loyalty, and service 
to the University, the society is composed of male under- 
graduates from the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Busi- 
ness Administration, and Education. 

In addition, five of the University's eleven colleges 
have their own special honor societies. The school of 
Education recognizes those students who have achieved 
both academic and professional distinction during their 



Scholars of the College 




Cross & Crown 




145 



first three years at Boston College by electing them to 
its Alpha and Omega Society. Similarly, seniors in the 
School of Nursing who have achieved high scholastic 
standing and have been notably active in University life 
are rewarded for their efforts by being appointed to the 
Siena Society. The Mater Spei Society is its counterpart 
in the Graduate School of Nursing. Membership in Beta 
Gamma Sigma, the only scholastic honor society recog- 
nized by the American Association of Collegiate Schools 
of Business, is the highest academic honor that can be 



attained by an undergraduate in the College of Business 
Administration. Finally, Dean's List students in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences who have distinguished them- 
selves in extracurricular activities are appointed to its 
Order of the Cross and Crown. 

Each year, the College of Arts and Sciences also hon- 
ors several students who have demonstrated the highest 
level of academic ability, intellectual maturity, and 
scholarly achievement by appointing them Scholars of 
the College. Under the guidance of specially selected tu- 





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146 



tors, these scholars attend class at their own discretion, 
determine their own programs of study, and undertake 
the writing of research theses which are presented to the 
University at graduation. 

Finally, there exists at the University Omicron Delta 
Epsilon, a chapter of the national honor society in Eco- 
nomics and Sigma Pi Sigma, its counterpart in the field 
of Physics. 

Thus, all of these societies serve as a constant reminder 
of that excellence which is the goal of the Boston College 
student. 




147 



k. of c. 



The B.C. Council of the Knights of Columbus is a Cath- 
olic fraternal organization whose prinnary aim is spiritual 
and social service to the University and the community. 

Their numerous services include co-sponsorship of the 
University blood drives, teaching C.C.D. classes, and 
serving as counselors at the Newton Boys' Club, as well 
as campus-wide lectures on topics of especial interest to 
the modern college student. 

As a fraternal society the Council holds an annual 
Communion Breakfast and is a member of the K. of C. 
College Council Coordination Committee. 






148 



The Boston College International Club, now in its fifth 
year of campus activity, is still in its embryonic stages. Its 
present membership numbers nearly one hundred Pri- 
marily a social organization, its chief purpose is the pro- 
motion of better understanding between the American 
students and the foreign students on the B.C. campus. 
In attempting to realize this objective, the club's social 
activities have included informal panel discussions, 
parties, and events such as this year's "African Night" In 
all its functions, the club's officers strive to place Ameri- 
can-foreign student relations on a more meaningful per- 
sonal basis. 



international club 



Club president outlines plans. 





International Club In session. 





149 



rod and gun club/ricci 



The aim of the Ricci Mathematics Academy is to ac- 
quaint its members with the most significant develop- 
ments in the ever expanding world of mathematics. In 
this respect, in addition to its other mathematically ori- 
ented activities, its advisor, Reverend Stanley Bezuska, 
S.J., the recipient of many substantial grants established 
for the purpose of revamping mathematical instruction in 
the secondary schools, has introduced members to new 
instructional methods in the field. The Academy also 
sponsors several bridge, whist, and chess tournaments 
during the course of the year. 




Annual Ricci Math Academy Chess Tournament. 



Check. 





150 



The Mendel Club serves to acquaint future members of 
the medical profession with various aspects of develop- 
ment in the current medical scene. Guest speakers are 
brought to campus to address the membership. This year, 
the addition of Nursing students to the organization 
added interest and spurred attendance. The social high- 
light of the year was the annual dinner dance. 

In 1967, the Mendel Club was directed by President 
Edward Cottle, Vice-President David Burns, Secretary 
Richard Skoblar, and Treasurer Richard Stanton. 



mendel club 



/lendel Club Officers. 








fyr^y 






151 



lay apostolate 



"Going Out to All Nations" has been the practical 
motto of the Boston College Lay Apostolate program 
since its inception ten years ago. Since that time, paper 
plans have become operating realities, as B.C. under- 
graduates have sponsored their classmates and alumni 
in their mission to the farthest regions of the earth. 

They represent us in Jamaica, performing teaching 
and nursing tasks throughout its villages and towns, and 
in Iraq, teaching a variety of subjects in the educational 
institutions of its ancient cities. They have tutored Eng- 
lish to foreign peoples in the South Pacific, Japan, and 






152 



the Philippines. The volunteers serve as nurses in Mexico, 
Korea, Zambia, and Alaska. 

On the home front, many of our present students have 
participated in the summer program in Kansas City, Mis- 
souri where they worked in the underdeveloped areas of 
the city, teaching both children and adults, building, and 
aiding the residents to complete projects that they had 
already begun themselves. Some students lived with the 
families and count the days spent with them as the most 
memorable of their lives — an occasion which promised 
lifelong friendships. 



In addition to the sense of accomplishment that is 
theirs, the volunteers realize that this experience has af- 
forded them the opportunity to discuss their ideas and 
way of life with people of diverse backgrounds. The re- 
sult of such associations has been a better understanding 
of themselves in relation to the world community. 

Theirs is a spreading of Christianity by living Christ — 
through word and action, a helping hand, an understand- 
ing ear. It is a Christianity that encourages others to 
share its beliefs and conduct by its concern for concrete 
human problems ratherthan abstract intellectual exercises. 







153 



political clubs 



The major purpose of all B.C. political clubs is to stimu- 
late interest in political affairs. The Young Democrats 
Club and the Young Republicans Club try to inspire party 
ideals and mold responsible future party members, while 
Y.A.F. and the A.D.A try to provide open discussion of 
conservative and liberal opinions. 



Young Democrats Officers. 




Checking the voting list. 







154 




The first semester saw much activity on the part of the 
two partisan clubs. After vigorous early membership 
drives, both sponsored speeches by state-wide candi- 
dates and provided opportunities for their members to 
participate in the actual campaigning. The Young Repub- 
licans were far more successful than the Young Demo- 
crats in both respects, their two real triumphs being a 
speech-reception visit by Governor Voipe and an elec- 
tion night party at the Hotel Somerset. During the fall 
semester, little was heard of either the ADA or the YAF, 
which underwent a constant change of command. 



During the second term, the Young Republicans 
stepped into a role not formerly associated with the po- 
litical club's activity. In addition to their efforts to stir in- 
dividual thought through the work of a special Policy 
Committee, they became strongly involved in specific 
University affairs. For example, the conducted a campus- 
wide SDS poll and laid plans for a new student magazine. 

Also during the second semester, the B.C. YAF chapter 
began to show definite signs of life as they sponsored a 
book sale and a Vietnam teach-in. The ADA, however, re- 
mained in a state of suspended inactivity. 



Senator Brooke Speaks at Young Republicans Forum. 





155 



the heights 



Since its founding in 1919. The Heights, the under- 
graduate newspaper, has served Boston College by re- 
porting and commenting upon events occurring within or 
relating to the members of a Christian intellectual com- 
munity. 

During the last four years, University life at Boston Col- 
lege has to a large degree shed much of its intellectual 
and institutional dross in the process of realizing what a 
Catholic university should and possibly can be. It is times 
like these, times of institutional awakening, that make 
working on a collegiate newspaper interesting. 






ChHJlwiWs 





"'h,. 





U.S. AGGRESSORS 
GET OUT OF SOUTH I 
: D'-^ .*T ONCE: 




.jr.^a.^^ j^***' 




156 



Throughout Boston College's awakening and struggle 
for university legitimacy. The Heights has established it- 
self as the representative of student opinion favoring the 
ideals and goals endemic to a true university. From 1 963 
to 1967, in incidents like the Michaud case (perhaps our 
first experience with real politik at Boston College), the 
fight for retreat reform, Fr. Healey's dismissal and the 
events surrounding the visit of Vice-President Humphrey, 
The Heights has shown itself a crusading protagonist not 
for what is but for what should be. 

While boasting a "liberal" ideological position during 



these four years. The Heights has progressed technically 
as well. It was ranked "All-American" for the first time in 
its history, for both spring and fall semester of 1966, the 
highest award offered by the Associated Collegiate Press. 
Aggressive news coverage and probing, pertinent edito- 
rial comment highlighted both commendations. 

As a student activity. The Heights will probably always 
exist at Boston College. However, its excellence will de- 
pend upon its success in attracting the committed, vi- 
sionary students it has been fortunate to have in the past, 
to continue its "mission" at Boston College. 







157 



humanities/ J- o. b. 



The Humanities Magazine, the undergraduate journal 
devoted to original articles of research in the liberal arts 
and social sciences, annually publishes two general is- 
sues consisting of contributions from each school of the 
University. This year, a special edition containing exclu- 
sively contemporary literature was also published. 

The Journal of Business is the research-oriented pub- 
lication of the College of Business Administration. It has 
sought to reflect those aspects of business which will be 
most stimulating to the student. 






158 



The Stylus is the oldest undergraduate literary maga- 
zine of any Catholic College in this hemisphere. Founded 
in 1882, it is today recognized as one of the better col- 
lege magazines of creative writing. In addition to original 
literary entries, it was the showcase for the talents of 
B.C.'s student artists this year. 

Cosmos is the undergraduate journal of the sciences. 
Previous to its appearance, a separate journal was pub- 
lished by each science department. But since each shared 
the goal of extending to the student body a knowledge of 
recent research in the natural sciences, it was decided 
that a unified effort would be more effective. 



cosmos/ Stylus 






159 



sub turri 



Once again the staff of the Sub Turri has emerged 
victorious. After having spent innumerable hours in our 
subterranean domicile, we have produced a volume 
worthy of its name. 

The project was initiated in May of 1966, as the Edi- 
torial Board was selected. Shortly thereafter, plans began 
to formulate. The staff was appointed early in September 
and the wheels of production slowly began to squeak. 
Those wheels, however, were lubricated at the first 
champagne party of the year, which followed the Holy 







S^, 





160 



Cross Victory Dance which we sponsored. 

The major portion of the work was underway in De- 
cember, with the advent of the first deadline in the offing. 
Roger Pelissier had begun completion of his picture as- 
signments when his extensive social commitments would 
allow. The massive amounts of copy were compiled and 
corrected by Marlene Gauthier The pages were laid out 
amidst the ever-present stench of Charlie Weschler's 
stogies. 



Morale, a most important element, was kept on a high 
plane by our in-residence funsters under the direction 
of Jay Nannicelli. Patty Lou Henna, our managing Editor 
consistently provided the staff with imaginative ideas, a 
few of which were even followed. 

March came fast upon us and the completion of this 
monumental task neared the end. In early April, "the 
book", as it is called by those in the know, was finally laid 
to rest. 



•3 







fn 











V -I 












162 



WVBC is the campus radio station manned by B.C. 
students specifically for the entertainment of the dorm 
residents. Operating from studios in Fulton Hall, the 90 
hours of broadcast time per week include everything 
from "continuous rocl<" to late evening jazz. 

New equipment has allowed a great deal of expansion. 
A UPI teletype machine has made possible up-to-the- 
minute sports and news coverage, and detailed news 
specials. A cartridge-tape system has enlivened the 
"rock" shows. Equipment donated by WEEI has made 
possible the establishment of a second broadcast studio 
and production facilities. 



w.v.b.c. 







163 



r.o.t.c. 



The Boston College Reserve Officers Training Corps 
was organized in 1947 by Colonel James M. Lewis, 
U.S.A. Its purpose then was to train artillery officers for 
the Arnny, but in the past nineteen years, the program 
has undergone tremendous modification and improve- 
ment. 

1966 found ROTC as a general military science pro- 
gram preparing basic and advanced corps cadets for all 
the branches of the Army. The Regular Army officers 




comprising the cadre of the B.C. unit represent the In- 
fantry, Artillery, and Corps of Engineers. Leadership 
training is the prinnary concern. The emphasis is no longer 
placed upon the preparation of the artillery officer, but 
the officer. 

There were several changes in the program this past 
year. A special "Black Beret" counterinsurgency training 
unit was organized; this B.C.C.U. emphasizes practical 
soldiering, training its members in such skills as map 
reading and close-combat fighting during work-outs on 



campus and on weekend training trips to Fort Devens. 

B.C. suffered an important loss this year with the re- 
tirement of Sgt. Major William L. Cote who had been sta- 
tioned at the Heights for more than six years. One of the 
finest enlisted men in the country, the Sgt. Major exem- 
plified the good soldier as well as the good instructor 
and leader. 

However much the B.C. unit might change though, 
the purpose of its program will remain the same — to 
train leaders for America's fighting forces. 







165 



sodalities 



In its attempt to "update" the Catholic Church, Vati- 
can II has provided for a much greater degree of partici- 
pation by the laity. It may truly be said that the layman 
has come of age. The Church looks to its laymen for as- 
sistance in proving that indeed, God is very much alive. 

But an active laity was in force as early as 1 563 with 
the establishment of the Sodality Movement as an as- 
sociation whose primary end is the spiritual growth of 
its members and the subsequent expression of their 
Christian commitment through various apostolic works 
which are performed within their own milieu. It is in this 
area of Christian involvement — the means by which they 







166 



fulfill their desire to make a more visible commitment to 
God's people — that the Sodality Movement is most 
widely recognized. 

On the B.C. campus, there are three Sodality groups 
active in the community and University spheres. 

Members of the Men's Sodality worked in C.C.D. pro- 
grams and an adult religious education program. They 
directed a Big Brother Program as well as recreational 
programs at the Emmanuel House in Roxbury. Tutoring 
and guidance, directed towards college admission for cul- 
turally deprived high school students, was carried on 
through Project Opportunity. On the campus, the group 



again sponsored the Fourteen Flicks film series. This year, 
it also co-sponsored a Fordham-B.C. Sodality publication 
on contemporary theology, and discussion groups on 
such topics as peace, ecumenics, and existential 
psychology. 

This year, the Women's Sodality of the School of Ed- 
ucation ioined in the various activities of the Men's So- 
dality in addition to conducting a separate tutoring pro- 
gram of its own at Dennison House in Roxbury. 

The Nursing Sodality gears its apostolic activities to 
the duties of the nursing profession as a means of ful- 
filling the Christian ideals embodied in the Sodality. 



^^1 


, *■ 1 





I ki» 






ist!^: 



t*'»rji 



SjP*"i~?*^ 



167 



w.r.a. 



The Women's Recreation Association is an athletic 
organization open to all women students of the School 
of Education and Nursing. The W.R.A.'s goal is to unite 
B.C .'s women students by means of more than twelve 
athletic events which include varsity basketball, tennis, 
fencing and cheerleading. W.R.A. also strives to encour- 
age physical fitness as well as to foster a spirit of sports- 
manship and competition among its members. Because 
it is a relatively new club, this year was devoted to en- 
hancing its athletic activities and gaining campus-wide 
recognition. 





168 




CBy-'.!)!$i)a'Jr'»^'.;?gS 



jA'ili' 



Picture the B.C. campus in the fall, with multicolored 
leaves covering Linden Lane and the warm sun sparkling 
on the Eagle by Gasson Tower. Soon the warmth and 
beauty of the campus is covered by the cool of a fall 
night and then it begins. 

"RALLY!" Throngs of students pour out of their dorms 
and the air rings with cries of "TO THE CIRCLE!" Shoul- 
der to shoulder, ten across and a hundred deep, the 
singing, chanting, dancing crowd winds its way down 
Commonwealth Avenue to Cleveland Circle. There the 
students sit and sing "For Boston." Remember those 
good old rallies? This two page introduction to sports 



will recall the great events of the past three years which 
brought glory to the Heights and pride to students. 

Sept. 19, 1964— B.C. and Syracuse in football. The 
Eagles have held Little and Nance and their number one 
ranked team to a 14-14 tie. Jeers fill the air as it ap- 
pears B.C. will settle for a tie. With 15 seconds left, 
Marzetti drops back and arches a wobbly 55 yard pass to 
end Cronin. He leaps into the air between three defend- 
ers, grabs the ball and carries it into the end zone as the 
crowd became hysterical. With two seconds left the score 
reads, B.C. -21 Syracuse-14! 

Nov. 27, 1965 — the Eagles defeat Holy Cross on a 



Unseld against Wolters. 



Cronin's historic catch 








"TO THE CIRCLE! 




IVIcCarthy heads for goal line. 




rain-soaked field. McCarthy wins the O'Melia Trophy as 
B.C. wins the game 35-0. 

Feb. 1 5, 1 965— the Eagles defeat B.U. 5-4 to win the 
Beanpot Trophy for the third straight time. Feb. 22, 1 966, 
the team defeats Dartmouth 6-2, giving "Snooks" Kelley 
his 400th win, while the fans give him a huge cake and a 
ten minute standing ovation. Mar;, 1 965 — the Eagles win 
their first EC. AC. Playoff crown beating Dartmouth 5-3, 
Clarkson 3-2 in overtime and Brown 6-2. 

Mar. 1965 — B.C. meets four goal favorite North Da- 
kota in round one of the N.C.A.A. Playoffs. The score 



reads 3-3, when York splits the defense and gets the 
winning goal with a slap shot. Michigan Tech beats the 
Eagles 8-2 in the finals and leaves them second in the 
nation. 

Mar. 12, 1966 — B.C. is playing nationally ranked 
Louisville in the N.I.T. Behind 74-72, Hockenbury puts 
in a lay-up at the buzzer to send the game into' overtime. 
B.C. misses the last shot of overtime one and the score 
is 80-80. Louisville misses a final lay-up and the second 
overtime ends 84-84. When Unseld fouls out, the Eagles 
finally win 96-90 for their greatest victory ever. 



E.C.A.C. Final: B.C.-6 Brown-2. 




Victory Cake: Kelley's 400th. 



York's winning M.C.A.A. goal. 






Bob Hyland was one of the most outstanding seniors 
on the 1966 football team Despite a losing season, he 
was named to three All-American teams and selected to 
play in the East-West Shrine Game and the Senior Bowl 
Game. Coach Duffy Daugherty of Michigan State, Hy- 
land's coach in the Senior Bowl, said Bob and All-Amer- 
ican Bubba Smith were the best linemen he had ever 
coached. 

At B.C. Bob played center and guard, as he had at 
Archbishop Stephinac High School in White Plains, New 
York. Throughout his four years Bob could be seen open- 



ing holes for halfbacks, protecting the passer, or blocking 
on a sweep. Even when injured he played to the best of 
his ability. Throughout his career, he has displayed the 
attributes of a fine scholar-athlete. Though quiet and soft- 
spoken, he was a leader and greatly inspired his team- 
mates. He continually praised the team and offensive line 
coach Emerson Dromgold. The 1964 Syracuse win and 
this year's Penn State game are the most memorable for 
Bob. A marketing major, he was the first round draft 
choice of the Green Bay Packers. 



Kavanagh is interfered with. 



Guard Lavoie finds it hard to relax. 





Delia Villa sweeps Villanova for 1 yards. 





»ti^. 



173 



"If Syracuse slips, Boston College is the team most 
likely to supplant the Orangemen as the class of the 
East." This was how one pre-season poll saw B.C.'s sea- 
son. The Eagles were also picked to make the Top Twenty 
with an 8-2 record. But the final tally read 4-6 and many 
were disappointed. A few breaks and fewer injuries could 
have made the record 7-3. 

A large crowd journeyed to Annapolis to see the first 
game of the season against Navy. B.C. received the kick- 
off and drove to the 25 of Navy only to lose the ball on 



mistakes. Later a Thomas pass was intercepted and re- 
turned for a T.D. Pass defense was the Eagles greatest 
problem. In the last period, he threw a 2 yard T.D. pass 
to make the final score 27-7 for Navy. 

The next week, Ohio University invaded the Heights 
with a twelve game losing streak! They scored 10 points 
the first two times they had the ball. In the third period, 
Thomas led the team 57 yards in ten plays and scored on 
a dive play to make the score 14-10. An Eagle field goal 
fell short and Ohio went 75 yards in one play to end 



Stetz halts V.M.I, quarterback. 



Again Hyland protects Thomas. 




Egan for the first down. 


















Bennett stopped for no gain. 




Option play— Thomas to Erwin. 



■v■:w''S^^■^•f'^^^^ 












174 



B.C.'s hope for victory. 

A weak V.M.I, came to muddy, rain-soaked Alumni 
Stadium and B.C. won a game and lost a quarterback. 
Early in the game, Thomas dislocated his shoulder and 
was out for the year. O'Neil caught five passes for 118 
yards and one T.D. while Donovan, Delia Villa, and De- 
Leonardis ran over everyone. Early in the game, the 
Eagles went to the V.M.I, six and fumbled. Later Donovan 
scored from the two. B.C.'s defense was great and the 
statistics were B.C. with 430 yards to 1 38 for V.M.I, and 



a 1 4-0 victory for the Eagles. 

B.C. was "up" for Penn State and almost pulled an 
upset. After leading 15-8 at half time, the pass defense 
failed and Penn State ended up with 221 yards and two 
T.D.'s on passes. Marzetti hit 11 of 25 passes for one 
T.D., and ran for 63 yards. On a broken play, Marzetti 
found McCarthy with a T.D. pass and later capped a 71 
yard drive with a two yard plunge as the Eagles lost 
30-21. 



It takes three to stop Number 44. 

Jaf' 4»Jia&Ja^^lJ£-^iag^Bg III 111 ■!■ ^^m^sammsss^-^ 



"G-o-o-o-o EAGLES!" 




%* 



ifj ^^H^'^M 



-<^ 




McCarthy heads for the hole. 













175 



A capacity crowd packed Alumni Stadium to see B.C. 
play Syracuse in a game that was supposed to decide the 
Lambert Trophy, according to pre-season polls. Syracuse 
rolled up a 23-0 half time lead and won 30-0 on their 
way to a bowl game and the Lambert Trophy. B.C. got 
only eight first downs, reached the Syracuse 34 only 
once, had a total offense of 73 yards, and had three 
passes intercepted. Little and Csonka ran at will for 221 
yards. 

ROTC Day saw Buffalo at the Heights. Delia Villa 
scored first; then, late in the first half, Buffalo made it 
8-7. With less than a minute to play, Bennett took the 



kickoff on the 1 5, headed up the right sideline, got two 
great blocks, broke to center field and outran the de- 
fenders 85 yards for a T.D. and a 14-8 lead. In the third 
period, the Bulls scored on a pass and made it 15-14. 
Marzetti came back with a "bomb" to Delia Villa and 
Kavanagh caught a pass for two points and a 22-15 
lead. A Buffalo drive made it 22-21 , but Borsari stopped 
the two point attempt on the one. 

Regional TV carried the B.C. -William and Mary clash. 
This weird game saw the Eagles throw away three early 
scoring chances inside the five yard line. Fumbles, inter- 
ceptions, and poor calls were the reasons. In the second 



B.C. meets H.C.-THE Game! 



Pass clicks against the Cross. 











Morale boosters never quit. 



176 




half, B.C. drove 91 yards on Marzetti's passes and on his 
31 yard run: McCarthy went the last eight yards for the 
score. He dove in from one yard out in the last period to 
make the score 1 5-6, with a two point pass play to 
Kavanagh. The first W and M touchdown came as their 
end, while falling to the ground, caught the pass. The 
point after was missed but following their next T.D., 
they got it and were behind 15-13. The defense gave up 
only 27 yards rushing but 265 passing, while McCarthy 
and Marzetti combined for 21 5 yards rushing. 

Villanova was "psyched up" for victory. For three peri- 
ods no one scored, then a 35 yard run put Villanova 



ahead 7-0. An interception made it 13-0. B.C. lost the 
ball on downs and the Wildcats, on a fourth and 17, 
scored to make the final 19-0. In the third period, the 
Eagles drove to the 25 where McCarthy missed on a 
fourth down play by inches. He gained however, 55 of 
B.C.'s 73 yards and the Eagles stood 3-5 for the season. 
Then came the game where B.C. had to defend its 
honor and pride while UMass was reaching for "big time" 
football status with a 6-2 record and another Yankee 
Conference Championship. B.C. moved at will but had 
trouble scoring, while the defense stopped UMass cold. 
A field goal and a safety made the half-time score 5-0. 



Great pass defense — Kutz. 



Bennett's second effort gains 3 yards. 




Then in the third period, B.C. put together a drive. Mar- 
zetti picked up 25 yards to the one and Delia Villa swept 
in for the T.D. and an 11-0 lead. UMass scored on a de- 
flected pass that was caught as the Redmen's end was 
on the ground in the end zone. O'Neill added his second 
field goal and B.C. won 1 4-7. 

The final game saw Holy Cross, with a 5-3-1 record, 
come to B.C. for revenge. It was the wildest, strongest 
game ever played in the Jesuit rivalry. It looked like a 
romp in the first period as Lentz ran for one T.D., passed 
for one, and Raminski kicked two fields goals for a 19-0 
lead. In the second period, the Eagles shocked everyone 
by scoring 20 points in 7 minutes and 18 seconds. A 
drive ended with a 10 yard Marzetti to Egan pass for the 
first score. Guard Dick Kroner grabbed a loose ball from 



Lentz and, while many stood around, started the slowest 
run in B.C.-H.C. history. With Lipson running interfer- 
ence. Kroner lumbered 55 yards to cut the Cross lead 
19-13. H.C. fumbled the kick-off and Kutz recovered on 
the twenty-six. B.C. fans went wild. DeVito, who came 
from nowhere to be the hero, hit Kavanagh for a T.D. and 
20-19 lead. The second half saw Lentz score to make it 
25-20, Holy Cross. But DeVito passed to Egan and Kav- 
anagh, and McCarthy ran to move B.C. again. Kavanagh 
made a one hand catch and went to the five where De- 
Vito punted; a clipping penalty hurt B.C., but they drove 
to the 27 where O'Neill tried a field goal. Everyone but 
the referee said it was good. Minutes later, Lentz scram- 
bled for his life and found Kimner open for the winning 
score 32-26. 



McCarthy drags Villanova line for 2 yards. 




Gang tackling halts Ohio U. 




Bennett rambles 85 yards for TD. 



Kane returns kickoff. 



.\ --l^^i^ii 







Delia Villa looks for running room. 





178 



INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



RUSHING: 


TC 


YG 


YL 


NY 


TD 


AVG. 




Dick DeLeonardis 


8 


39 





39 





4.87 




Dave Bennett 


33 


158 


4 


154 





4.67 




Terry Erwin 


5 


22 





22 





440 


SCORING: 


Dave Thomas 


18 


95 


17 


78 


1 


433 


Paul Delia Villa 


Brendan McCarthy 


139 


594 


9 


585 


2 


4.21 


Mike O'Neill 


Bill Donovan 


16 


67 


1 


66 


1 


4.12 


Brendan McCarthy 


Joe Marzetti 


115 


570 


189 


381 


1 


3.31 


Dave Bennett 


Mike Violante 


8 


22 





22 





2.75 


Jim Kavanagh 


Joe DIVito 


8 


34 


12 


22 





275 


Bill Donovan 


Paul Delia Villa 


81 


265 


43 


222 


4 


2.74 


John Egan 


John Kane 


9 


21 


8 


13 


1 


1.44 


John Kane 


PASSING: 


ATT 


COM 


YDS 


INT 


TD 


EXP 


Dick Kroner 


Joe Marzetti 


126 


36 


549 


10 


4 


2 




Dave Thomas 


59 


18 


252 


1 


1 





Dave Thomas 
Gordie Kutz 


Joe DiVito 


21 


11 


174 


3 


1 






TD EP(1) EP(2) 




10-11 









2-2 



FG 


2-7 























30 

22 

18 

14 

10 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

2 



Front row, left to right: Head Coach Miller, Kutz, Carlyon, Pesapane, Collins, 
Captain Lipson, Blair, Stetz, O'Neill, Gurry, Hyland. 

Second row: Coach Clemns, Risio, Powers, Donovan, Schneider, Kitlowski, 
Reardon, Connors, Sarkesian, Doherty, Graziano, Coach Miller. 



Third row: Coach Dickie, Marzetti, Violante, Petruzziello, Garofolo, Kuharich, 
Froelich, Hazlin, Lavoie, Giardi, Coach Dromgold. 

Fourth row: Clemens, Borsari, Eagan, Horman, Markey, Kane, Erwin, McCarthy, 
McGovern, Eager, DiVito. 




Fifth row: Borababy, Dunbar, Roccia, Spellecy, Pierandri, Ragosa, Hughes, Norton, 
Toupal, Townsend, DellaVilla. 

Sixth row: Toof, Carrigan, Thomas, Sullivan, Kroner, Hunt, Duffy, Evans, Nevard, 
Fleming, DeLeonardis. 



Seventh row: Manager Croce, Persuitte, Zailskas, Andrachik, Kruger, Gallup, 
Cavanaugh, Salmon, Scully, McGeoghegan. 

Eighth row: Cunningham, Daniels, Kavanagh, Bennet, Ladewig, Murphy, Shepard, 
LePore, Graham, Grace, Sr. Manager Lawrence. 



PUNTING: NO YDS AVG. 

Joe DiVito 49 1889 38.4 

Mike Robertson 5 162 32 4 

Mike O'Neill 6 182 30.3 

PUNT RETURNS: NO YDS TD 



Tom Carlyon 


12 


45 





Jim Grace 


5 


14 





Dan Zailskas 


4 


25 





Dick DeLeonardis 


4 


14 





Kickoff Returns: 


NO 


YDS 


TD 


Dick DeLeonardis 


12 


245 





Dave Bennett 


8 


226 


1 


Jim Grace 


8 


191 





John Kane 


5 


83 






1 966 Varsity Record 




RECEIVING: 


NO 


YDS 


TD 


EP 






Jim Kavanagh 


17 


282 


1 


2 






Paul DellaVilla 


13 


207 


1 





7 Navy 


27 


Barry Gallup 


11 


157 








14 OhioU 


23 


Mike O'Neill 


7 


140 


1 





14 V.M.I. 





Dave Bennett 


7 


91 


1 


1 


21 Pen n State 


30 


John Egan 


7 


87 


1 





Syracuse 


30 


Brendan McCarthy 


2 


4 


1 





22 Buffalo 


21 


John Kane 


1 


7 








1 5 William and Mary 


13 












Villanova 


19 


INTERCEPTIONS: 


NO 


YDS 


TD 




14 U. Mass 


7 


John Salmon 


5 


112 







25 Holy Cross 


32 


Tom Carlyon 


4 


24 







Won 4, Lost 6 




Jim Grace 


3 


35 











Ed Lipson 


3 


21 











Harry Connors 


1 











179 



hockey 



Captain Jerry York is a prime candidate for first string 
Ail-American as a result of his over-all play and 67 sea- 
son points. A product of B.C. High, he had a colorful ca- 
reer at B.C., including the upsetting goal against North 
Dakota in the 1965 NCAA, playoffs, five goals in the 
1965 EC. AC. playoffs, All-East honors, All-Tourney hon- 
ors many times, and recipient of the Walter Brown Me- 
morial Award as New England's top American hockey 
player. His 134 career points rank him fourth in all time 
B.C. scoring, while he holds the record of most goals in 
one game — five. Captain York typifies the spirit, hustle, 
and morale that made a fair team a great one. 



Captain Jerry York 




180 



John "Snooks" Kelley entered his 31st season at B C 
with an unprecedented 402 wins and only 175 defeats. 
He said it was a building year with many sophomores 
and few lettermen. Spirit, hustle, and morale were the 
goals, with the hope of pulling a few surprises. Pre-sea- 
son polls had B.C. just making the E.C.A.C. playoffs, but 
for those who remembered the rebuilding year of 1964- 
65 with its second place N.C.A.A. finish, Kelley was 
fooling no one and it came as little surprise that his re- 
building year ended in success again, with a third place 
in the E.C.A.C. behind powerhouses B.U. and Cornell. 

The regular season opened with a surprise 12-3 vic- 



tory over senior studded Yale, heralded as one of the 
East's best. Hurley played his first game as a wing and 
scored his first hat trick of the season. Previtt got his 
first two varsity goals and Cohen was great in the net. 
Johnson had the crowd roaring when his clear-in pass 
started bouncing around and slipped past the startled 
goalie. 

B.U. came to the Heights ranked number one and de- 
feated B.C. for the fifth straight time 4-2. The breaks fell 
against the Eagles which was evidenced by penalties and 
two nullified goals. With the score 4-2, Allen was awarded 
a penalty shot after being tripped on a breakaway. He 



Rebound shot! 



One on three break. 





McCarthy trick shot. 




181 



missed, was awarded another shot when the goalie left 
the crease too soon, and missed the second. 

Brown gave Hurley a shadow that kept him from tak- 
ing a shot, but York and Allen hit three goals and Clarke, 
Fuller, and Kinsman scored as the Eagles won 6-3. Cohen, 
Allen and York were named game stars by the Brown 
Daily Herald. Hurley came back strong and scored his 
second hat trick of the year to pace an 8-4 win over 
Princeton. Robertson got his first varsity goal and York 
and Clarke continued their consistent scoring. Cohen and 
Johnson were great on defense as B.C. was playing be- 
yond expectations. For the sixth time B.U downed B.C. 



The John Gallagher Memorial Award went to B.U. goalie 
Ryan as the game's best performer. This new award 
would continue to be given at each B.C. -B.U. game. Trail- 
ing 4-1 Fuller and Allen made it 4-3 in the second 
period. But the Eagles collapsed and the Terriers bombed 
Cohen for four more goals and an 8-3 win. 

The Christmas Season found the Eagles meeting last 
year's NCAA. Champion Michigan State in the Garden 
Tournament and after a wild game, succumbed 5-3. 
However, they returned to down Northeastern 6-0 in the 
final round and placed third in the tournament. The East- 
ern Olympics came to the Heights having beaten all the 



Dowling keeps it in. 
/ 



Kinsman gets over anxious. 




TRIP I I 





/ -^ -- 4Sm[' 



182 



local teams, but fell to B.C. 8-2 in a surprise upset, be- 
hind York's only hat trick of the year. Cohen was out sick 
and had been replaced by Sophomore George McPhee 
who played so well that he continued in the nets for the 
rest of the year. Two Canadian teams followed the Olym- 
pics and also found the going rough. Loyola lost 1 0-3, as 
Hurley scored his third hat trick: then McGill fell 6-2. 
McPhee was sparkling and the team clicked well. B.C. 
seemed to have a post Christmas let down and lost to 
Northeastern 4-2, playing one of their worst games of 
the year. 

Clarkson's defending EC AC. Championship team in- 



vaded the Heights. In preseason polls, they had been 
ranked fourth in the East. Gordie Clarke's third period 
goal was the deciding one in a wild game. Kupka scored 
twice while Kinsman, Allen, and Johnson each lit the 
lamp. With two minutes remaining and B.C. leading 6-4, 
the Golden Knights pulled their goalie. They pressed and 
with seconds remaining scored to make it 6-5, but it 
came too late. Paul Hurley received unanimous acclaim 
for his efforts against Harvard. B.C. trailed 3-1 in the last 
period, then Hurley hit his second goal; one that amazed 
both goalie Fitzsimmons and the crowd. The slap shot 
hit the goalie's pads and curved into the net. Fuller fol- 



YorktoFuller-SCOREI 







Clark solos for a tally. 



A genius at work. 





^ 



183 



lowed with the tying goal. Earlier, McPhee kicked out a 
breakaway that would have made it 4-1, Harvard. In the 
overtime, Allen set up Bastarache for his second varsity 
goal and the exciting win. Division II leader Colby came 
to McHugh and was defeated. Kinsman scored a hat trick 
and York hit for two as B.C. easily rolled to its tenth vic- 
tory before exams. 

Returning from exams, B.C. maintained their momen- 
tum. Kupka and Fuller scored two goals apiece as an 
E.C.A.C. television audience saw the Eagles take a 5-0 
lead. "Snooks" missed the game due to illness, and "Red" 
Martin took over. The East's number two team was almost 



upset, but Cornell hung on for a 3-2 win. A capacity crowd 
saw Bob Ferguson's late third period goal win it. B.C. 
complained that one man was in the crease, but to no 
avail. Clarke scored first and Cornell scored as B.C. 
changed lines to lead 2-1 . After a wild scoreless second 
period, Clarke and York broke in on the goalie, who came 
30 feet out and York pushed the puck into the net. Mc- 
Phee, who made spectacular saves, was pulled and B.C. 
pressed but couldn't score. McPhee had 40 saves, 20 in 
the hectic second period. Getting back to winning ways, 
B.C. bounced R.P.I, around 12-2 and Hurley got his 
fourth hat trick. Behind 1-0 and 2-1, B.C. caught fire for 



Another Johnson dash halted. 




WlcPhee kicks out another. 




184 



eleven goals in preparation for the Beanpot. 

Everyone was hoping for another B.C.-B.U. show- 
down in the Beanpot, but the Eagles fell to a hustling 
Northeastern, 6-5, in a thrilling overtime game. St. 
Lawrence was dumped by B.C.'s hot first line in a tone 
up for the consolation game of the Beanpot. Kupka man- 
aged two goals while York and Clarke each scored. York's 
goal came on a long pass from Clarke as he broke in on 
the goalie alone. Kupka and Clarke hit on blazing slap 
shots, which ended the scoring. In the consolation game, 
the Eagles again gave the fans an exciting exhibition, 
beating Harvard in overtime 6-5. Garden officials wanted 



to leave it a tie, but fans protested and B.C. went on to 
win. A sloppy Providence team was defeated 9-0 as B.C. 
sent 53 shots at their goalie and only 44 were stopped. 
McPhee and Cohen had only 27 saves. Unheralded Put- 
nam found the mark twice. McPhee posted another shut 
out as Ed Jerimiah and "Snooks" Kelley met for the final 
time in the nation's oldest coaching rivalry. B.C. easily 
defeated Dartmouth 8-0 for its 16th win of the series. 
The B.C. -Army clash was the greatest finish ever, ac- 
cording to Kelley and B.C. fans. To get an EC. AC. play- 
off birth the Cadets needed to win. The Eagles played 
a sluggish game and were behind 2-1. Late in the third 



"GO ll\l, SHOOT 



Woody clears the zone. 





Kupka's bid foiled. 




185 



period, with six minutes left, York put in a rebound to tie 
it up. Then began the greatest eleven seconds of B.C. 
hockey; the most explosive ending ever seen according 
to "Snooks". With 54 seconds left, Prevett pushed the 
puck out of the corner to Hurley who blazed it home. As 
the crowd roared, York took the face off and caught the 
goalie starting to leave the ice and put in a 40 foot slap 
shot. York took the ensuing face off and passed to Clarke 
who hit a shot eight seconds later. The crowd was hyster- 
ical and the B.C. band sounded its seventh consecutive 
round of For Boston. The final score read 5-2. North- 
eastern continued its hex on the Eagles by downing 



them for the third consecutive time, 3-1 and gained its 
first win ever on B.C. ice. The Eagles threw away many 
scoring chances and just couldn't connect. York made it 
2-1 in the third period, but a scramble in front of the B.C. 
net ended in N.U. taking the lead 3-1. Hurley and the 
Eagles ended the season by crushing Providence 13-2, 
as "The Shot" hit his fifth hat trick. Within 5 minutes 
of the second period, B.C. went from 3-0 to an 8-1 lead. 
Hurley added three assists to five goals and Allen had 
two goals and five assists. The Eagles were now ready for 
the E.C.A.C. playoffs, which they richly deserved after 
placing third in the East, 1 8-7. 



York signals goal as first line clicks. 




Capt. York gets 1 of fiis 67 points. 



Smash— it's Woody! 




....... 41 ^-^ 




186 



SCORERS 


YEAR 


POS. 


GP 


PER 


G 


A 


PTS 


PIM 


HT 


WG 




YORK, Jerry 


Sr. 


c 


28 


87 


26 


41 


67 


14 


1 


2 




HURLEY, Paul 


Jr. 


c 


28 


87 


32 


23 


55 


12 


6 


5 




ALLEN, Whitey 


Jr. 


RW 


28 


87 


17 


33 


50 


19 


1 


2 




CLARKE, Gordie 


Jr. 


RW 


28 


87 


23 


19 


42 


23 





3 




KUPKA, Bob 


Sr. 


LW 


27 


83 


16 


17 


33 


6 










KINSMAN, Fred 


Sr. 


LW 


25 


72 


14 


13 


27 


4 


1 


1 




FULLER, Dick 


Sr. 


LW 


28 


87 


12 


12 


24 


12 





4 




MacCARTHY, Barry 


So. 


RD 


28 


87 


4 


19 


23 


40 










DOWLING, Steve 


Jr. 


LD 


28 


87 


5 


16 


21 


56 










JOHNSON, Woody 


Sr. 


LD 


28 


87 


5 


13 


18 


54 





1 




FLYNN, Mike 


So. 


C 


28 


85 


4 


13 


17 


4 










PREVETT.Jim 


So. 


RW 


28 


78 


7 


9 


16 


4 










BASTARACHE, Ray 


So 


RD 


28 


87 


2 


10 


12 


12 





1 




ROBERTSON, Mike 


So. 


LW 


18 


45 


2 


4 


6 


8 










PUTNAM, Bill 


So. 


C 


8 


20 


2 


2 


4 


4 





1 




CEDORCHUK, Steve 


So. 


LD 


12 


16 





1 


1 













0'NEIL,Jack 


So. 


LD 


3 


3 






















COHEN, Jeff 


Jr. 


G 


13 


23 











2 










McPHEE, George 


So. 


G 


24 


68 











4 










GOALIES 




YEAR 


GP 


PER 


SAVES 


GA 


SO 


AVG. 


w 


L 




McPHEE, George 




So. 


24 


67 


629 


61 


3 


2.73 


16 


6 




COHEN, Jeff 




Jr. 


13 


20 


213 


29 





435 


4 


2 




i " ^ 


» 


lM 


fl 


Hff 


1. 


A 


-^ 


i^ 


^\- 


: f)^ 


_■ 




overall record; won 20, lost 8 pet. .714 



division I: won 14. lost 6 pet. .700 



12 


Yale 


2 


Boston U. 


6 


at Brown 


8 


at Princeton 


3 


at Boston U. 


3 


Michigan St. 


6 


Northeastern 


8 


Eastern Olym 


10 


Loyola 



3 


6 


McGill 


4 


2 


at Northeast. 


3 


6 


Clarkson 


4 


4 


at Harvard 


8 


6 


Colby 


5 


6 


at Colgate 





2 


Cornell 


2 


12 


at R.P.I. 


3 


5 


Northeastern 



2 


5 


St. Lawrence 


4 


6 


Harvard 


5 


9 


Providence 


3 


8 


at Dartmouth 


1 


5 


at Army 


2 


1 


Northeastern 


3 


13 


at Providence 


2 


9 


Clarkson 


6 


2 


Cornell 




6 


St. Lawrence 



1 

5 


2 
3 

2 
2 

12 
4 

187 



garden tourney 



In the annual Boston Garden Christmas Tournament, 
B.C. entered against the East's best, B.U., Michigan State 
and Northeastern. The Eagles met the Spartans and, al- 
though they outplayed them, came out on the short end 
of the final score 5-3. Behind 4-3, McPhee was pulled in 
attempt to even the score. The partisan fans cheered 
B.C. on but to no avail. With less than a minute remain- 
ing, Michigan State scored into an empty B.C. net. The 
consolation game saw B.C. defeat Northeastern 6-0. 
Whitey Allen hit for his only hat trick of the year, while 
McPhee was great. As a result, the Eagles took third 
place in the tournament. 



Fight, Jerry! 



"The Shot's" backhand. 





McPhee halts Michigan State. 




188 



A B.C.-B.U. final was anticipated in the Beanpot, but 
N.U. upset the Eagles, 6-5, in overtime to spoil it. The 
lead changed hands until York soloed to make it 4-3, 
B.C. Behind 5-4, the Eagles had a goal nullified, but man- 
aged an overtime on the next shot. Nine minutes passed 
in which B.C. couldn't score, even with a two man ad- 
vantage. Then N.U. scored to end it. McPhee was great 
with thirty-eight saves. Against Harvard, B.C. again 
needed an overtime to win 6-5. Allen went in alone for 
the victory. York, Hurley and Allen were great as the 
Eagles again settled for third place in the tournament. 



beanpot 



Another day, another game. 





On the move. 




In on goalie. 






189 



GaCaaaCa 



Once again "Snooks" Kelley's Eagles fought their way 
into the E.C.A.C. playoffs. Playing round one on home ice, 
B.C. took on the Golden Knights from Clarkson, before a 
capacity crowd. A close contest turned into a rout as 
Flynn, Clarke and York scored within a minute to take a 
4-0 lead. Period two saw Kupka, Kinsman, and Fuller all 
but end the game. Paul Hurley tied the all-time record for 
hat tricks in a season when he scored his sixth of the 
year. McPhee had one of his finest games and the team 
played great hockey in a convincing 9-2 victory. In the 



St. Lawrence shoots . . . SAVE! 











Soph. McPhee makes another spectacular save. 




190 



semi-finals, B.C. was out to settle a score with Cornell, 
but the Big Red was just too much and B.C. played be- 
low-par hockey. A dozen records were set in the 12-2 
loss which saw York give Doug Ferguson twelve stitches 
in the eye. Play was rough and at one point the penalty 
box contained seven players. Except for Johnson's check- 
ing, the B.C. fans had little to cheer about. 

Another successful season ended as it started, with a 
victory. St. Lawrence was defeated in the consolation 



game 6-4. The Eagles started fast with a 6-0 lead, but 
allowed four goals to be scored on them in the last 
period. The Larries were kept alive by its goalie who had 
19 saves in the first period, to six for McPhee. Kupka, 
Allen and Hurley made it 3-0. Then Clarke scored a 
record setting two goals in six seconds. York added a 
score in the last stanza to close out the season and leave 
the Eagles final record 20-8, good for third place in 
the East. 



Where's the puck? 



Dowling awaits a rebound. 





Perfect power play set up. 








191 



basketball 



Captain Willie Wolters' spirit and determination was 
reflected in the team's play and final record. The 6' 8" 
Senior holds the school records for most rebounds in a 
game, in a season, and in a career. Among his awards are 
the Most Valuable Player in the Beanpot, in the B.C. -Ford- 
ham game, and in the Boston Garden Tournament. He 
was named All-East and placed on many All-Tourney 
teams. Willie is a psychology major and hopes to give 
pro basketball a try. To quote a banner at the last home 
game of the year, "Thanks for the Memories!" 

Even before the football season ended, the countdown 



Capt. Wolters hits tie breaking jump shot. 




192 



began for basketball. A Courtside Club was formed and 
a "Beat Providence" sign was hung in Roberts. Coach 
Cousy had been building for two years and now had a 
team with unlimited potential. Sophomores Evans and 
Driscoll developed overnight and played like veterans. 
Hence, B.C. enjoyed its greatest year ever. Pre-season 
polls placed them as high as fifth in the nation and first 
in the East. Final polls had them ninth in the nation and 
top in the East. Individual honors included: Coach of the 
Year-Cousy; Boston Garden Tourney Team-Wolters and 
Evans; Boston Tourney MVP-Wolters; All Sugar Bowl 



Team-Adelman; Ail-American Honorable Mention-Adel- 
man; NCAA. Regional Team-Driscoll; and EC. AC. 
Sophomore of the Year-Evans. 

The season began against a non-N.C.A.A. opponent, 
Quantico. It was no contest as B.C. ran, shot, and re- 
bounded in excellent style. Driscoll was high scorer with 
23 points as B.C. romped 101-80. U. Mass was the first 
NCAA. game. Defense and foul shots saved this one as 
the Eagles hit 32 of 36 free throws. Evans showed his 
great style and Adelman had 20 points. A strong zone 
defense won the game 86-63. 



Bill demonstrates for Jim. 




Driscoll lays it in. 





>^6 w 




193 



Against U. Conn the Eagles were slow and it took Adel- 
nnan and Driscoll to keep them alive. Terry had fifteen 
points and twelve rebounds. Evans and Kelleher held high 
scorer Bialosuknia to 16 points. Adelman's shooting 
finally iced the game, though Mice was the only consis- 
tent scorer in this 87-69 victory. Unbeaten Harvard fell 
thanks to Adelman's 32 points, Driscoll's 21 points, and 
board control by Wolters, Driscoll, and Kissane. With 
three minutes left, Adelman and Evans gave B.C. a thir- 
teen point lead and it was over. In the other non-N.C.A.A. 
game, B.C. ran over the Swedish Nationals for an easy 



84-65 win. 

The Eagles next captured the first Boston Garden 
Tournament over Syracuse, U. Mass, and Manhattan. Un- 
beaten Syracuse fell first 87-75 in a thriller and then 
U. Mass was beaten for the title 75-67. Cousy's men 
showed excellent speed, shooting, and defense in these 
games, and were ready for the Sugar Bowl Classic. Possi- 
bly over-confident with an 8-0 record, B.C. lost a close 
one in the last second to Utah, 90-88. However, they 
came back to defeat Tennessee in the consolation game 
68-61. 



Evans overTexiera. 




Steve Adelman tips in a Wolters shot 




194 



Navy invaded the Heights and was sunk 101-76. 
Wolters was great with nineteen points and good all- 
around play, and Evans sparked at ball-hawking and play- 
making. Navy was completely out-classed. Northeastern 
played its usual slow game, but fell 54-47. The Huskies 
led at half-time 28-26, then Evans and the 2-3 zone went 
to work. Wolters finally tied it and Evans on a fast break 
put them ahead. Willie had thirteen rebounds as the 
East's top small college team lost to B.C. Against a weak 
but stubborn Duquesne, Driscoll came off the bench and 
rallied the Eagles to a 93-66 win. He had eighteen points 



and twelve rebounds. Evans had a twelve point scoring 
rampage in the second half for a 78-53 lead. Then Cousy 
emptied his bench. 

Seton Hall was the next victim, 90-75. Superior height, 
shooting, and the fast break told the story. Evans ran wild, 
Adelman hit 27 points, Driscoll had 24 and ruled the 
boards with Wolters. Next, H.C. lost to B.C. 92-74. A 
close game turned into a romp when Adelman and Dris- 
coll combined for sixteen straight points. H.C. came back, 
but Driscoll's ten points ended it. It was a great team 
effort and the defense was excellent, holding heralded 



Bill maneuvers. 



"Hit the low post!" 







Top scorer Adelman, double teamed. 





195 



Teixeira to six points and Siudut to thirteen. Revenge 
was obtained when B.C. defeated St. Joseph's at the 
Palestra, 83-69. Wolters was great on defense, hold- 
ing Cliff Anderson to six points. Adelmans deadly shoot- 
ing and Driscoll's rebounding gave B.C. a 43-31 half- 
time lead. Adelman hit for 27 points, 20 of them in the 
first half. It was a great victory, but may have led to over- 
confidence, because against weak Fordham, the team 
played their worst game of the year and lost 85-81. 
The Rams hit 35 of 38 foul shots to win, although B.C. 
kept close to the end. Evans had thirteen points and 



eleven assists. One good result was that the team lost all 
cockiness for the year. 

Against Rhode Island, the Eagles were erratic, but 
managed an 81-71 victory. Driscoll came off the bench 
to spark a rally that put B.C. ahead. Evans was great as 
usual. The second half saw the Rams close the score to 
69-64, then no one scored for three minutes. Wolters 
finally iced the game with a three-point play THE GAME 
in Eastern basketball saw B.C. playing Providence. The 
Eagles were out for revenge and got it. They ran to a 51 - 
32 half time lead on the play of Evans and the shooting 



Evans-Kvancz press Terriers. 




Students remember. 



Wolters and Mice receive Courtside Club award. 



THANKS 

FOR THE .A3;' 
MEMORIES 



20 



\\ 



111. 




196 



of Adelman and Wolters. Walker had only eleven points 
until the Eagles changed their tactics in the second half 
and became sloppy. Walker then hit 22 points and it was 
a tie game, 73-73, with three minutes left. Koski fouled 
out, but Walker's three-point play put Providence ahead. 
B.C. kept its poise and came back. Welter's four foul 
shots and Adelman's jumper made it 79-76 B.C. Willie 
scored with 24 seconds and Hayes with twelve and the 
lead was only one. Kissane got the ball, froze it in the 
backcourt for nine seconds, then threw it away at the 
buzzer as B C beat the Friars 83-82. Mullaney was im- 



pressed by Evans and the B.C. defense. This game gave 
the Eagles the New England title and an almost sure 
NC.A.A. bid. 

A poor B U. team tried to play a slow game, but made 
too many mistakes, as B.C. rolled 74-46. Evans had 
seventeen points and seven assists as the entire team 
played. Following the game, the team voted to accept an 
NCAA, bid instead of an N.I.T. bid. However, former B.C 
coach McGee's Georgetown team almost spoiled things 
before falling 103-91. B.C. was down by eleven until 
Evans and Kissane closed it to 48-47 at half-time and 



Doug's jumper— GOOD! 



Kissane us. Friars. 




X * 



His Master's voice. 




I«/IT 




197 



put the Eagles ahead 64-51 in the second period. 

In the final home game, B.C. defeated Canisius in a 
close one 80-76 Evans was out sick and Wolters and 
Mice were playing their last home game, Willie had fif- 
teen and Doug cooly hit two foul shots in the last minute 
to win the game. The Griffins were deadly from outside, 
but B.C.s desire and team play came through for win 
number twenty. As usual, the Holy Cross finale was a 
thriller. H.C. could do nothing wrong in the first period and 
they led by as many as seventeen before a regional TV 



Charge or foul? 



Adelman taps it up. 





THE score of THE GAME! 



.-"-i--^ I'/TTirm 




198 



audience. Adelman's twenty points kept B.C. alive. In 
period two, the Cross' lead was cut to 53-46 and then 
Driscoll led a rally to put B.C. ahead 54-53. The Eagles 
lost a six point lead with 1:11 to go and it was 70-69. 
Kvancz hit a free throw and with 3200 fans screaming, 
Capt Willard of H.C. missed a jumper, Driscoll took the 
rebound and passed to Kvancz, who was fouled. Jack 
made both shots and then a jumper for a 75-69 edge. 
It was a thrilling finish to a thrilling season — and the 
N C.A.A remained. 



Driscoll hooks over Texeira. 



Kelleher for two. 





Wolterson defense. 




199 



101 


Quantico 


80 


90 


86 


at Massachusetts 


63 


92 


93 


at Fairfield 


76 


83 


87 


Connecticut 


69 


81 


99 


at Harvard 


81 


81 


84 


Swedish Nationals 


65 


83 


87 


Syracuse 


75 


74 


75 


Massachusetts 


67 


103 


88 


Utah 


90 


80 


68 


Tennessee 


61 


76 


101 


Navy 


76 


48 


54 


Northeastern 


47 


63 


93 


Duquesne 


66 


80 


OVERALL: 


WON 23 LOST 3, Pet. 


.885. 


NCAA: 


WON 21 


LOST 3, Pet. 


.875. 



at Seton Hall 

Holy Cross 

at St. Joseph's 

Fordham 

at Rhode Island 

Providence 

Boston University 

at Georgetown 

Cansius 

at Holy Cross 

Connecticut 

St. John's 

North Carolina 



75 
74 
69 
85 
71 
82 
46 
91 
76 
71 
42 
62 
96 



POINTS: For-2151: Aga.-1856 
POINTS: For-1966; Aga.-1711 




INDIVIDUAL SCORING 

NAME 

Adelman. Steve 

Driscoll. Terry 

Evans. Billy 

Welters, Willie 

Kissane, Jim 

Kvancz. Jack 

Hice, Doug 

Kelleher, Steve 

Pacynski, Tom 

Rooney, Ed 

King. Jim 

Helton, Jim 

Gallup, Barry 

BOSTON COLLEGE TOTALS: 
OPPONENTS TOTALS: 



YEAR 


POS 


GP 


FG 


% 


FT 


% 


REB 


PTS 


AVG 


Jr 


F 


26 


203-470 


43.2 


77-114 


67.5 


177 


483 


18.58 


So 


C 


26 


126-259 


48.1 


99-135 


73.3 


262 


347 


13.35 


So 


G 


25 


1 13-225 


50.1 


90-144 


62.5 


67 


316 


12.64 


Sr 


C 


24 


94-183 


51.4 


63-90 


70.0 


206 


251 


10.46 


Jr 


F 


26 


90-198 


45.5 


59-94 


62.8 


174 


239 


9.19 


Jr 


G 


26 


80-164 


48.8 


53-72 


73.6 


58 


213 


8.19 


Sr 


F 


25 


54-96 


56.3 


47-59 


79.7 


39 


115 


6.20 


Jr 


G 


21 


25-55 


45.5 


5-8 


62.5 


6 


55 


2.62 


Jr 


C 


11 


13-26 


50.0 


0-3 


0.0 


22 


26 


2.36 


Jr 


F 


13 


10-27 


37.0 


5-10 


50.0 


12 


25 


1.92 


So 


F 


15 


10-23 


43.5 


5-10 


50.0 


25 


25 


1.67 


So 


G 


5 


2-5 


40.0 


3-5 


60.0 


1 


7 


1.40 


So 


F 


6 


0-1 


0.0 


5-7 


71.4 


4 


5 


0.83 






26 


820-1732 


47.5 


51 1-751 


68.0 


1213 


2151 


82.68 






26 


730-1664 


42 2 


450-624 


72.5 


1013 


1856 


71.38 



200 



Bob Cousy came to B.C. four years ago with an im- 
pressive record. Everyone wondered if the sport's great- 
est player could become one of its greatest coaches. This 
year Bob was voted New England's Coach of the Year by 
the largest margin ever. He has brought an unknown 
team with a 10-16 mark in 1 963 to national prominence 
in 1967. Bob and B.C. are crowd-pleasers everywhere. 
Although a soft-spoken man, he motivates the men to 
play their hearts out for him. His spirit, his ability, and 
his class have become part of basketball at B.C. The 
class of '67 salutes B.C.'s best team and its great coach, 
the immortal "Mr. Basketball." 








201 



Christmas tourneys 



B.C. was 3-1 for Christmas Tournaments. In the Boston 
Tourney, they defeated unbeaten Syracuse 87-67, on 
Evans' twenty-one points, and won the Tournament beat- 
ing Massachusetts 75-67 on Wolters' nineteen points. 
Evans and Wolters made the All-Tourney team. At the 
Sugar Bowl in New Orleans, B.C. lost to Utah in the last 
second 90-88, as Adelman missed the final shot. He had 
already scored thirty points. In the consolation game, 
the Eagles beat Tennessee 68-61 in a a slow down 
match. Adelman, a crowd pleaser there, made the All- 
Tourney team. With these Christmas victories began talk 
of the NCAA. Tournament in March. 






202 



B.C. turned down its third straight N.I.T. bid to enter 
the N.C.A.A. playoffs. In round one of the Eastern Re- 
gionals, they faced the Yankee Conference winner, U. 
Conn. The Huskies played a slow down game and it 
worked until B.C. took a 14-13 half time lead. After 



n.c.a.a. 














/ 




203 



winning the important second half tap-off, Adelman hit 
seven straight points and B.C. led 21-13. The Eagles 
held a flexible eight point lead and at times played a slow 
down game themselves. The 2-3 zone worked and kept 
them out of foul trouble. Adelman had sixteen points and 
Kissane ten, while Bialousuknia was held to only fifteen. 
Cousy felt that the Huskies' tactics were bad and did 
little to help the image of college basketball for the re- 
gional T.V. fans. B.C.'s 48-42 win sent them to College 
Park, Maryland for the Eastern Regional semi-finals 
against St. John's. 



The Eagles were out to revenge their 1965 NIT. loss 
to the Redmen. Although sloppy, the game ended dra- 
matically and left the 14,000 fans limp. B.C. had to play 
catch-up ball all the way. Driscoll put in a great shot to 
make the half time score 24-22, St. John's. Quickly the 
Redmen took a 30-22 lead. The Eagles fought back but 
couldn't get closer than three points. With three minutes 
left, Cousy called time out and blasted the team. They 
came back and with 1 :53 left, Adelman put them ahead 
59-58. A big play followed when Evans' pass-in hit the 
guide wire and the ref ruled it had been deflected by St. 






Jik\ 



204 




John's. Evans then threw to Wolters who was fouled and 
put in both shots with 55 seconds remaining. After a 
steal, Driscoll passed to Evans who was fouled and made 
the score 63-60, B C. St. John's scored the last basket to 
make the final 63-62. The Eagles hit 23 straight foul 
shots in the second half and Adelman scored seventeen 
points to aid in the victory. 

The championship spelled the season's end for B.C., as 
third ranked North Carolina rolled to a 96-80 win. Lewis 
hit 31 points and N.C.'s height took over in the second 
half. The Eagles played their fast type of game in the first 



half and took a quick 12-3 lead. But poor shooting and 
defense saw N.C. go ahead 15-14, B.C. hit the last six 
points of the first half to cut the lead 44-42. With seven 
minutes left in the second half, B.C. was behind 69-64, 
but they scored only two baskets in the next six minutes 
and it was over. Senior Doug Hice played well until he 
got into foul trouble. Driscoll scored 17 points and got 
ten rebounds to win a berth on the All-Regional team. 
Kissane played excellently with 15 points and ten re- 
bounds. B.C. proved it could play on the same court with 
the nation's best teams. 





baseball 



B.C. was considered a darkhorse when the baseball 
season began, but by the final game Coach Peiiagrini had 
molded a tournament team. Key players in the successful 
season were All-League choices Bill O'Brien (7-2), Ed 
Foley (5-3), and the double-play combination of Ander- 
son and Riley. Team play and pride finally ended in a 
13-5 record and a trip to the NCAA. District I playoffs. 

The Eagles opened the campaign with six straight 
wins. M.I.T. was the first victim with Riley and Kitley 
getting five hits and Ford relieving O'Brien on the mound. 
After a see-saw battle, R.I. lost 5-4, with Amick hitting a 





s,ii->ii"'^ 



w^^ 




"Hi neighbor, have a Gansett; it's BC baseball tim 




The hit and run is on. 




206 



two-run triple. O'Brien pitched a six-hitter and Hocken- 
bury tripled while Amick homered to defeat Springfield. 
Fighting to maintain a winning streak, B.C. came from 
behind to overtake Dartmouth 7-5. After Plunkert tied 
the score with a pinch-hit single, Foley homered to win 
the game. O'Brien hurled his second shutout to down 
Harvard. Bill gave up only four hits and Prifty belted a 
two-run single to gain the 3-0 win. For their sixth straight 
win, B.C. got six runs in the eighth inning with a three- 
run homer by McElaney as Tufts was defeated. 

League leader Northeastern ended the Eagles streak 
by handing them their first of three defeats. Kos of N.U. 



hit a grand-slam to decide the game. In beating Provi- 
dence, B.C. set a record of eleven broken bats in three 
innings and Kitley hit a 335-foot homer. Foley struck out 
seven and allowed only four hits. Fine hitting and pitch- 
ing gave B.C. two more wins before B.U. gave O'Brien 
his second and last season loss. Then N.U. ended B.C.'s 
greater Boston League title hopes and captured the flag 
themselves with a 4-1 win on a rain-soaked field. All 
the runs came in the eighth inning. Before the B.C.-H.C 
series, the Eagles downed Amherst on an Anderson 
homer and beat Providence on Foley's pitching. 







t^»»»s' 







^ -^ ^ ^ 



:rf««^^1VlkVt 



Stolen base. 



Kitley saves a wild throw. 








Close, but OUT. 





207 



The Holy Cross series had extra meaning since B.C. 
and the Cross were fighting for the final playoff spot in 
District I. The University of Massachusetts, Northeastern, 
and Colby had been chosen. It was felt that B.C. (1 1-3) 
was the stronger team with a better league and regional 
record, but had to prove itself against the Cross (9-4). 
The Eagles quickly got the tournament bid by stomping 
H.C. 5-0 before a large Alumni Day crowd. O'Brien threw 
a five hitter and struck out twelve. B.C. got two runs in 
the first inning when O'Neill doubled, Anderson singled 
him home and McElaney pushed him home after a walk. 
In the seventh inning, Kitley doubled, O'Neill got hit by 
a pitch, O'Brien walked, Foley beat out a hit, and a 



passed ball added two runs. A day later, the Cross scored 
an upset by winning 2-1 on an interference call in the 
last of the ninth inning. It was a close 1-1 game when 
after a strike-out, Hockenbury threw wild to second base, 
attempting to throw out a runner trying to steal. When 
the runner rounded third base, O'Neill fell on him and 
as he got up slowly, the umpire awarded the runner home 
and the winning run. The last game of the series was 
rained out. 

The 1 966 team almost made Omaha and although not 
rated high in pre-season polls, it combined teamwork, 
spirit and talent to put Pellagrinis boys on top again. 

In round one, B.C. met University of Massachusetts, 



A long fly, going, going, going — FOUL. 



Anderson crosses the plate. 





Happiness is a game winning home run. 




^ 



mm 




Hockenbury to Riley for the out; Anderson backs up. 







->5^^ 



208 



the Yankee Conference champs. O'Brien got into trouble 
early, allowing 8 hits and 4 runs in four innings. Pellagrini 
left him in and he finished, giving eleven hits and five 
runs. Bill hit a two-run single and Anderson chipped in 
with a homer to left. When the game ended after 8 in- 
nings because of rain, the score read B.C. -8 Mass. -5. 

It was B.C. -Northeastern in the finals. Grolnic held 
B.C. to 4 hits and only 2 runs, as N.U. triumphed 10-2. 
The Huskies got 6 runs in the second inning and 4 runs 
in the ninth. A double by Anderson scored one run, but a 
rally collapsed. O'Brien allowed one hit, no runs and 
struck out 7 in relief for 6-2/3 innings. So ended another 
successful season. 



n.c.a.a, 



Runners lead away, one out. 



A swing and a miss, strike two. 





Problems of coaching. 



A perfect slide: B.C. 1-0. 




m. 





^.Jt^ ,•▼ 



\ 



Anderson scoops and throws to Kitley for the out. 





-# 




209 




B.C 
B.C. 
B.C 
BC. 
B.C 
B.C. 
B.C 
B.C. 
BC. 



M.I.T. 


3 


Rhode Island 


4 


Springfield 





Dartmouth 


5 


Harvard 





Tufts 


1 


Northeastern 


9 


Providence 


1 


B.U 


1 



(O'Brien) 


B.C. 


11 


Tufts 


1 


(Hutchison) 


B.C. 


1 


B.U. 


5 


(O'Bnen) 


B.C. 


1 


Northeastern 


4 


(Foley) 


B.C. 


5 


Amherst 


3 


(O'Bnen) 


B.C. 


3 


Providence 


1 


(Foley) 


B.C. 


5 


Holy Cross 





(O'Brien) 


B.C. 


1 


Holy Cross 


2 


(Foley) 


B.C. 


8 


U Mass. 


5 


(O'Brien) 


B.C. 


2 


Northeastern 


10 



(Foley) 

(O'Brien) 

(Foley) 

(O'Brien) 

(Foley) 

(O'Brien) 

(Foley) 

(O'Brien) 

(Foley) 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING 



POS. 


NAME 


CLASS 


G 


AB 


H 


2B 


3B 


HR 


RBI 


AVG. 


2B 


Fran Riley 


Sr. 


18 


57 


19 





2 





5 


.331 


SS 


Tom Anderson 


Sr. 


18 


68 


21 


2 





2 


9 


.310 


P-RF 


Ed Foley 


Sr 


16 


53 


15 


1 





1 


7 


.283 


3B 


Ed O'Neill 


So. 


18 


71 


20 


2 








5 


.281 


IB 


Bill Kitley 


Jr. 


15 


51 


14 


1 





1 


8 


.274 


LF 


Fred Prifty 


Sr. 


18 


71 


18 


1 


2 


1 


10 


.255 


C 


Ed Hockenbury 


Sr. 


17 


52 


13 





2 





5 


.250 


CF 


Ed McElaney 


Sr. 


17 


52 


13 





1 


1 


11 


.250 


RF 


Mick Amick 


Jr. 


18 


51 


12 


1 


1 


1 


12 


.240 


P 


Bill O'Brien 


Jr. 


11 


29 


6 











2 


.207 


P 


Pete Ford 


So 


7 


2 


1 














.500 


OF 


Marty Joyce 


So 


6 


6 


2 














.333 


3B 


Bill Plunkert 


So 


5 


4 


1 











1 


.250 


P 


Dennis Connolly 


Jr. 


1 


1 

















.000 


P 


Jim Curley 


So 


1 




















.000 


C 


Larry Marino 


So. 


1 


1 

















.000 



INDIVIDUAL PITCHING 



NAME 


CLASS 


G 


IP 


R 


ER 


ERA 


HO 


BB 


SO 


W-L 


Bill O'Brien 


Jr. 


11 


81% 


22 


17 


1.89 


55 


25 


75 


7-2 


Ed Foley 


Sr. 


8 


551/3 


17 


14 


2.29 


42 


19 


36 


5-3 


Pete Ford 


So. 


6 


13'/3 


5 


4 


2.79 


8 


14 


13 


0-0 


Rich Hutchison 


Sr. 


4 


eva 


4 


3 


4.63 


5 


6 


4 


1-0 


Steve Kelleher 


So. 


1 


1'/3 


2 





0.00 


1 


4 


1 


0-0 


Dennis Connolly 


Jr. 


1 


3 


4 


1 


3.00 


5 


2 


2 


0-0 


Jim Curley 


So. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


9.00 


2 





1 


0-0 



Coach Eddie Pellagrini completed his 9th season 

Won 1 1 1 Lost 67 Tied 1 

Captain: Tom Anderson, '66 
Senior Manager: John Muldoon, '66 
Assistant Managers: John Barry & Kevin O'Malley 



Percentage .624 



210 




^^ "." 



After a disappointing fall season, the 1966-67 track 
Eagles moved into the Spring schedule prepared to de- 
fend its New England I.C.4A. Championship which it won 
from Holy Cross last year. A strong freshman team from 
1965-66 added to a team built around six seniors which 
included Captain Bill Norris, Joe Kopka, John Lyons, 
Brian McNamara, Kevin O'Malley and Charles Zaikowski. 
Norris and junior sensation Jim Kavanagh were the 
team stars. Norris was the I.C.4A. steeplechase champion 
and Kavanagh picked up where All-American John Fiore 
left off in the weight events. Jim took third in the N.C.A.A. 



hammer throw and also won the A.A.U. decathalon at 
Buffalo. 

On the indoor schedule, after soundly defeating Rhode 
Island, the team competed against Harvard, M.I.T., 
Brown, Holy Cross, Boston University, and Northeastern. 
Other indoor meets included K. of C. in Boston, Millrose 
Games, BAA. Boston, K. of C. New York, G.B.C. at Tufts, 
N.Y.A.C. Championships and the Conn. Relays. 

The Eagles met Boston University, UConn., and Holy 
Cross in outdoor meets and competed in the B.C. Car- 
nival Relays, the Penn. Relays, the G.B.C. and the New 
England I.C.4A. Championship, ending the year. 



Another first helps close the gap against Harvard. 



Even track has its hazards. 





Norris on way to steeple-chase record. 




212 



Coach Gilllgan talks pre-meet strategy. 



Up-up-up and ooooover! 






m 




The 1 00 yd. dash takes stamina and a big chest. 










■""^"'^A ^k;^^*"^ 







213 



Art Kelley attempts to break John Thomas' record. 




Star Jim Kavanagh wheels around in preparation for a new discus record. 




ft 





214 



It could be a new record on the high hurdles. 



Another first in the broad jump. 




Coach Gllligan plans strategy. 





215 



y / f^ !^ n ^ p n RP. ^ '' n ^ ' . t •« ' p ' i .», • f^ V > 




216 



B.C.'s ski team placed sixth for the 1 966-67 season in 
the New England Intercollegiate Ski Conference's Osborne 
division. High point of the season was the B.C. slalom 
meet at Mad River Glen, Vermont. Second place went to 
soph Bill Toof, and ninth, twenty-first, and twenty-ninth 
to juniors Richard Fitzgerald, Roger Kerouac, and Richard 
Ballou. The Eagles placed third. 

Overall Champion of the NEISC's seven races was Bill 
Toof, with 67 1 out of 700 possible points Captain Steve 
Hamlet received the league's Senior Recognition Award, 
annually given to the senior who has contributed most to 
the NEISC in his four years. 



ski 





217 



soccer 



Soccer has finally made it "big time" at Boston Col- 
lege. In its fourth year as a club, it had a regular schedule 
and a coach. With the financial aid of student organiza- 
tions and the B.C. A. A., a field, nets, and uniforms were ob- 
tained. The players themselves did the rest by bringing 
home the only winning record of the fall campaigns. 

The "world's football game" acquired international 
flavor with many of the University's foreign students 
adding their skill knowledge, and points. Most of the 
players however, were local students with little or no 
experience. 

A word of congratulations must be given to coach Al 





Charlie Ponera maneuvers for a shot. 




%j|^2J*!*****!*r**i 




The winning goal is set up against a strong Nasson team. 




218 



Rufe, a former all-Conference goalie at Mt. St. Marys of 
Maryland. A graduate student in C.B.A., he was a volun- 
teer coach, but after his performance, he may be around 
for a while. The club finished a complete varsity schedule 
with a 9-4 record. This included wins over such highly 
regarded teams as American International, Lowell Tech, 
Nasson College, and St. Francis. The losses were to 
Gordon College, the N.A.I. A. Eastern Champions, and 
Nichols, which has lost only one game in three years. 

Only Captain Rich Quinn and Charlie Ponera, an orig- 
inal founder of the club, will graduate. The stars were 
Alfred "Skip" Gostyla who set a new scoring record of 



21 goals and 4 assists for 25 points and Alonso Villegas, 
a freshman from Colombia. Bill Plunkert, a third baseman 
in the spring, filled in at goal after an injury sidelined 
Doc Cavan, and his 2.28 average of goals against and 
two shutouts ranked him among the best goalies in New 
England. 

Next season the team moves to varsity status and a 
schedule featuring twice as many games and competi- 
tion to include such rivals as Brandeis, Tufts, Boston Uni- 
versity, and M.I.T. Due to hard work and persistence, it 
appears that Boston College now has another varsity 
team to proudly support. 



First Row (L-R): Warwick, Martinez, Jegede, Hinchey, Villegas, Nijhawan 

Second Row (L-R): Cahill, Saplenza, Gostyla, Sarno, Capt. Quinn, Ponera, Angelini 

Third Row: Manager Connolly, Buckley, Wasowski, Cavan, MacCormack, Innes, Narcisco, Coach Rufe. 

Missing: Plunkert, Mwaura 




B.C. 


3 


BC 


12 


B.C. 


4 


B.C. 


6 


B.C. 





B.C. 


7 


BC 


5 



Gordon College 


5 






Worcester JC 


1 


BC, 


3 


Maryknoll 


3 


B.C. 


2 


A.I.C. 


3 


BC 


2 


Nichols 


5 


BC 


3 


Worcester J C 





B.C. 


2 


Lowell Tech 


2 


BC 


2 



Wentworth Inst. 
Assumption 
Nasson College 
St. Francis 
Salem State 
Stonehill 



219 



rifle club 



The Rifle Club operates under the auspices of the De- 
partment of Military Science. The club seeks to encour- 
age organized rifle shooting and improved marksmanship 
through the intercollegiate competition of the Varsity, 
Women's, Freshmen, and ROTC Teams. 

Rifle Shooting is a recognized sport of the college and 
the Varsity Team members earn school letters. This year 
the Varsity Team won over eighty percent of its matches, 
with the highlight of the year being the win over North- 
eastern. The success of the Varsity Team was due to the 
shooting of seniors Jack Lambert, Bob Cartwright. Mary 
Gallogly, and John St. George. 






220 



Although handicapped by lack of both facilities and a 
coach, the Sailing Team had another successful season. 
In nine meets against New England's best, the Eagles 
won six trophies. At Stonehill, Rich Reinhard and Pete 
Gingras captured a first place trophy, while Emmet 
Logue's crew of Chuck Lamar, Art Kelly, and Art Stratton 
took first place at the Coast Guard Academy. Commo- 
dore Reinhard and Gary MacDonald skippered the team 
to a second place at Tufts. The third place came on the 
Potomac in the "Frostbite " Intersectional Regatta. 



sailing 





221 



golf 



After a slow start in the fall, the Golf team came back 
to have a good spring season. Rain and snow held up 
early practice, but in April things got started. The com- 
petition was fairly tough, but B.C. made a good account 
of itself. After the regular season, they competed in the 
New England championships. The team receives little 
recognition and supplies its own time and equipment. 
However, every year B.C. is represented on the greens 
and fairways of the East. As in any other season, drives 
that sliced, putts that hung on the lip of the cup and 
chips into the sand traps, told the story. 




^X 



1966-67 Golf Schedule 




.fei . \ 



i 



E.C.A.C. Tournament 
Babson, M.I.T. 
E.C.A.S. Golf 
Williams, Harvard 
B.U., Brandeis 
Greater Boston Golf 
Tournament 
Holy Cross 
Brown 
New Englands 



Burlington, Vt. 

Farmingdale, N.Y. 
Charles River C.C. 
Wayland C.C. 



Charles River C.C. 
Providence 
Rhode Island 



222 



The Wrestling Team, coached by Mr. James Maloney 
and captained by Rick Bradley (10-0) and Dick Moses 
(8-0-1), completed its seventh year of intercollegiate 
competition. The feature of this season's team was the 
wrestling of seniors Matt Avitable, Pete Gately, Tom Cur- 
tin, and Norm Leen. The team (4-4-2) defeated Bran- 
deis. Rhode Island, Boston State, and Holy Cross while 
tying Brown and Coast Guard Academy. 

Bright spots in an injury filled season were juniors Paul 
Trombi and Brian Froelich who lost only one match each. 
The future looks bright for this growing varsity sport. 



wrestling 



Reversal for two points. 



Pin him in 20 sec? 






223 



tennis 



One of the newest spring sports is tlie Boston College 
Tennis Club. It has been officially recognized as a varsity 
sport for the spring of 1 968, so 1 967 was its last season 
at the club level. 

The four boys returning from last year who made up 
the nucleus of the young and promising squad included 
John Chanowski, Bill Meakem, Jack Semar and Ken 
Sibelian. Other prospects for starting positions included 
Tom Delaney, Pete Gingrass, Joe Harney and Tom Hey. 

After regular season play, the team sent four players to 
Yale for the New England Tennis Tournament. 

Things look bright for tennis in the future. 






224 




features 



'yur^ ; '"^^ -fiyi--^ ■' 





junior week 



In Camelot the rain may never fall till after sundown — 
in Framingham however, it may and did. But as the scene 
switched on Friday night, even the rain couldn't spoil the 
elegant setting of Caesar's Monticello. There, the club 
orchestra set the mood for the more than five hundred 
couples who had come to dine and dance. All were enter- 
tained by the popular comedian. Jack Carter, who liter- 
ally stole the show in his own inimitable fashion. The 
culmination of the evening was the coronation of Miss 
Judi Lorden as Junior Prom Queen. It was her honor to 
reign that memorable night. 



We'll drink anything. 



"We sing our proud refrain.' 




Really! Ilii<e it. 





226 



You old DEVIL! 






227 



Along with the balmy days and misty nights of the 
spring of 1966 are stored the memories of Junior Week. 

In April, the Class of 1 967 set out in quest of a happy 
interlude in the midst of their academic cares. The result 
was the retelling of a legend filled with the adventure and 
excitement that characterized the whole of Junior Week. 
On this quest, we were led back to the days of chivalry 
and the Round Table as the Lerner and Lowe musical, 
Camelot, made its debut in Campion Auditorium on Wed- 
nesday evening, April 27. 

This Arthurian tale of the conflict between Sir Lance- 



lot's love for his queen and his loyalty to his king is a 
familiar one. But the performances of David Morgan as 
the idealistic king, Nancy Collins as the amorous queen, 
and Terry Dwyer as the gallant intruder, brought the tale 
to life. So much so, that for many, Camelot has become 
synonymous with Junior Week 1 966. 

This would have been impossible however, without the 
very competent and talented cast of supporting actors 
and actresses. Steve Lowe as the comic King Pellinore, 
Ray Sarno as the despicable Mordred, Connie Curran as 
his irresistible, sweet-toothed aunt Morgan le Fey, as 



What do you think? 



Give me my sword. 




What happened to the prompter? 





M 



w 



What have I done? 




228 



well as the numerous dancers, knights and ladies-in- 
waiting deserve proper recognition for their delightful 
performances which contributed so greatly to the show's 
success. 

Scenery for a Junior Show had never been so magnif- 
icent and elaborate. This was due to the artistic and cre- 
ative imagination of director Frank Mitton. Under his 
guidance, the magic land of Camelot appeared amidst a 
flourish of color with its splendid castles and enchanted 
forest. 

It was against such a splendid background that the 



brilliant, spectacular costumes found their proper setting. 
To Ann Home and her industrious staff belong the praise 
for these creations. 

A tremendous part of the fairy tale mood that was con- 
veyed in this production was due to the beautiful, lively 
musical score so superbly presented by the orchestra 
under the very capable direction of Burt Parcels. 

The audience seemed most reluctant to awaken from 
the magical spell which had been cast over them during 
the evening. This seemed to be signified most emphati- 
cally by their standing ovation. 



Let's go lusting. 



It's your turn now. 





Once a knight Is enough. 




229 



Yes. my lord! 






230 



Bringing together a host of varied talent, the concert 
was quite possibly the most unusual part of Junior Week. 
The Beach Boys received top billing, singing fanniliar hits 
to a capacity crowd at Roberts Center amidst the usual 
bantering for which they have become famous. Included 
in the program was The Lost, an area "rock" group. 
Brandishing loud guitars and long hair, they literally 
filled the room with sound. With a laugh and a song and 
another laugh, the Uncalled-For Three topped off the 
afternoon in the comic-songster tradition. It was a fitting 
end to a week so full of memories. 







231 



homecoming 1 966 




232 




Highlighting the fall social calendar, Homecoming 
1966 proved to be an outstanding event. On Friday eve- 
ning October 14, a lively audience enjoyed the exciting 
entertainment provided by the Isley Brothers and Martha 
and the Vandellas The program had many of B.C.s more 
jubilant constituents literally dancing in the aisles. 

The next day, at the important B.C. -Syracuse game, 
a motorcade conducted Homecoming Queen, Mary Har- 
rington and her court into Alumni Stadium. The lovely 
quintet was introduced to the capacity crowd by Sal 



DiMasi, chairman of the Social Committee of the Inter- 
class Council. Escorted by members of the Interclass 
Council, the girls added a refreshingly bright note to an 
otherwise somber afternoon. That night however, spirits 
were on the upswing at the Hotel Bradford where the 
Flamingos treated students and their dates to an evening 
filled with mirth and dancing. 

The weekend is now merely a memory, but to those 
who shared in the gaiety it will linger as a happy one. 








233 



lecturers/performers 



The goal of Boston College, as it is of every institution 
of higher learning, is the education of its academic family. 
In practice, this necessitates both a faculty that is compe- 
tent and challenging, and a forum for the ideas and talents 
of those not affiliated with the University. In providing 
for the latter, many eminent lecturers and distinguished 
performers have always graced our campus, and this past 
year was certainly no exception. Boston College was truly 
the proverbial "marketplace" for the meeting of noted 
spokesmen from varied and diverse fields. 

Since 1962, the Honors Program of the College of 



ftrnoldToynbee 





Barry Ulanov 




Hans Kung 



234 




Business Administration has contributed to this end by 
sponsoring the highly successful Loyola Lecture Series. 
Previous speakers have included such noted authorities 
as Sean Lemass, the former Premier of Ireland, Gustave 
Weigel, S.J., and author Vance Packard. 

This past year. Doctor Iran Van Chuong and Mr. Robert 
C. Tyo were presented to highly appreciative audiences. 
Dr. Chuong, one of the world's foremost experts on South- 
east Asia and the former South Vietnamese Ambassador 
to the United States, discussed "The Way to Peace: A 
Vietnamese View." Mr. Tyo, the Executive Vice President 
of the Black and Decker Manufacturing Company, asked. 



"Is Business for the Birds?" treating the principles and 
philosophy of business management. 

The Knights of Columbus also contributed to the intel- 
lectual life of the University by sponsoring Dr. William 
A. Lynch, the noted obstetrician and gynecologist. Speak- 
ing on birth control. Dr. Lynch offered the historical view- 
point on the subject and also discussed the problem of 
"the pill" and its moral implications. It was an illuminat- 
ing and informative experience for everyone involved. 

In March the Order of the Cross and Crown, the Honor 
Society of the College of Arts and Sciences, presented its 
annual piano concert with Jesus Maria Sanroma. Accord- 



Jesus Maria Sanroma 






235 



ingly, this year's program included selections from Hay- 
den, Chopin, Casals, and Gershwin. 

March also saw the annual Maurice J. Tobin Interna- 
tional Affairs Lecture, sponsored by the Student Senate 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. For the second time 
in the history of the series, the featured speaker was the 
famous and controversial British historian, Arnold Toyn- 
bee, whose speech was entitled, "The Future of Cities". 

The most comprehensive and diverse group of lectures 
and performances presented at Boston College is, of 
course, the Humanities Series, which is now in its tenth 



year. Originally organized as a forum for noted poets, and 
financed by a gift from a prominent New York physician, 
the series subsequently expanded to include all cultural 
activities. An obvious example of this change in focus is 
the added emphasis placed on musical production in the 
last few years. 

In conjunction with these endeavors, the Humanities 
Series has affiliated itself both with the American Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and the New England Poetry Circuit. 
The former organization provides lectures and performers 
in many fields, particularly music, and participation in 



Iberian Dance Theatre 



Don Cossack Chorus 




Alirio Diaz 





236 



their "Arts Program" has meant diversification for the 
program here. Boston College is one of the original founders 
of the Poetry Circuit which aims to provide interested au- 
diences for many of the nation's best younger poets. All 
of these events, including three or four art exhibits each 
year, are performed as a cultural service to the University, 
of course, but also as a public service to the community 
at large. 

The list of the past year's attractions is, indeed, an im- 
pressive one. The world of the performing arts was repre- 
sented by the Don Cossack Chorus, the Iowa String Quar- 



tet, the Yale Russian Chorus, the Iberian Dance Theater, 
and the classical guitarist, Alirio Diaz, who appeared at 
Middle Earth, the Boston College coffeehouse. The 
academic world sent the theologian, Hans Kijng, the 
playwright. Marc Connelly, and the critic, Cleanth Brooks, 
and many other renowned lecturers. Finally, the noted 
artist, Ulrico Schettini, painted a mural for the University. 
Working in McElroy Lounge, he lectured simultaneously 
on his techniques. All in all, it was a remarkably success- 
ful year for the Humanities Series and for the college 
community in general. 



Yale Russian Chorus 





THE lINIVEBSIir CHIHIlLf ;i BOSTON C01U6E 

C. AlEXaHDER PELOQUIN 



a -^ 




Jean Madeira 




237 



computer center 



The presence of a computer on the B.C. campus was 
occasioned not only by the need for more efficient admin- 
istrative operations, but also by the University's desire to 
assist, through computerized research, both the faculty 
and student body in the pursuit of more meaningful study 
in their respective fields of concentration. For the student 
especially, a knowledge of computers and their possible 
uses is an asset which will enable him to make great 
strides in the business world after graduation. 

In 1 964 Boston College acquired its present computer, 
the I.B.M. 1401, the largest available model. 





( ■.. |;|) 1 •■.I'jl I I "i;m 




I \ ! |\' 












238 



In keeping with the rapid expansion of all departments 
on our campus, so too, the Biology Department ushered 
in the past year with the opening of its own greenhouse. 
The major reason for its construction was to facilitate 
graduate studies. Other advantages of the structure are 
the opportunity it affords for the study of plant physiology 
and the biochemical activities of plant life. The green- 
house's constantly controlled temperature also allows for 
a successful study of tropical fish. In the future, it will also 
be available for the use of undergraduate students. 



greenhouse 






:,Mi .;// / 






239 



triple h 



The first semester of the past academic year was en- 
livened by the visit of Vice-President Hubert Humphrey. 
Arriving at the Heights on October 1 3, his purpose was to 
speak in behalf of the policies of the national administra- 
tion and to lend his enthusiastic support to the campaigns 
of Massachusetts Democratic candidates prior to Election 
Day, November 6. 

Greeted by pickets protesting the war in Vietnam, Mr. 
Humphrey entered Roberts Center under the protection 
of the Boston Police. Once inside, the Vice-President 
faced an auditorium jammed with 4,500 students and in- 







240 



terested news reporters. Following an introduction by 
Reverend Robert J. McEwen, S.J., Moderator of the Pub- 
lic Affairs Forum of Boston College, the conference began 
with Mr. Humphreys speech entitled, "Challenge of the 
Sixties." While recognizing the picketers' right to non- 
violent protest, he defended the necessity of the Admin- 
istration's actions in the Vietnam War. He mentioned 
America's power and its world-wide reputation as the 
bastion of justice and the guardian of the free world. 
Thus, he maintained that America was not in Vietnam to 
overtake the country, but rather to restore the peace 
which existed prior to the start of the present conflict. Mr. 



Humphrey ended his speech by stating that U.S. foreign 
policy in Vietnam was "cautious, prudent, and sensible." 
Before opening the conference to questions, Mr. 
Humphrey paused to praise the qualifications of the 
Democratic candidates for election in Massachusetts 
who had accompanied him to B.C. He lauded especially 
gubernatorial candidate Edward J. McCormack, and 
senatorial candidate Endicott Peabody, who was unable 
to attend. A panel consisting of WHDH's newsman Leo 
Egan, Thomas Gallagher of the Boston Herald, Robert 
Healey, Political Editor of the Boston Globe, and the 
Heights own Bill Waldron questioned the guest speaker. 






241 



boston 




242 



"What can you do in Boston?" is a query often on the 
lips of many college students. A great variety of diversion- 
ary activities exist to fulfill any possible desire. Whether 
you are a doer or merely a watcher, your spirit of adven- 
ture is sure to be satisfied in Boston. 

If seeking a cultural experience, you may wend your 
way through the Museum of Fine Arts, spend an evening 
at the Pops, or attend a preview of a Broadway-bound 
stage production. On the athletic scene, you may cheer 
the Celtics and the Bruins at the Boston Garden, or the 



Red Sox at Fenway Park. If in the mood for strolling, 
there is always the Charles River with its sailboats and 
crews, the Boston Common and Public Gardens, or the 
Freedom Trail. 

Entertainment such as is found in the many coffee 
houses of Boston, provide yet another face of Boston. 
The variety of music presented in these establishments 
ranges from jazz to blues and folk. There you may also 
hear the works of an aspiring young poet or view an ex- 
perimental form of theatre. The entertainment is exciting. 






^ALF 



SMOKV JOE'S 



>l 



243 



unique and often sparked by enthusiastic audience 
participation. 

For those devotees of the stage, Boston has much to 
offer. Whether it be a pre-Broadway engagement with 
big name stars, a local company production featuring 
some excellent local talent, or a college effort head- 
lining some possible future star. The wide selection of 
quality plays performed in and around town makes the 
hectic scramble for tickets a truly worthwhile effort. 

A city's museums make a tremendous contribution to 



its overall cultural environment. Boston is most fortunate 
to be able to boast several fine museums of art and 
science. 

The libraries of the many area colleges and universities 
in addition to the Boston Public Library, fondly referred 
to by its frequenters as the "B.P.L., " afford students a bet- 
ter opportunity to locate source material for those numer- 
ous papers. 

In their leisure hours, college students also enjoy con- 
gregating at some favorite spot to engage in the friendly 




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244 



art of conversation As a relief from the daily pressures of 
academic life, students are able to unwind in the local 
tap rooms which dot the city. Every college has one or 
two locales which are patronized by the quaffers who 
have miraculously attained legal maturity in the state 
of Massachusetts. 

There are many fine pubs other than the select few 
which collegians regularly visit. A new trend in many bars 
has been to establish a place where stags can meet new 
people and where girls can find pleasant company. As a 



result, these new places are now referred to as "date 
bars." 

If you enjoy a good meal, Boston houses numerous 
restaurants — some elegant, some simple — to suit Indi- 
vidual tastebuds. Baked beans may have made Boston 
famous to "foreigners," but when in Boston you may also 
discover what Boston is famous for among its own citi- 
zens while enjoying a delicious seafood dinner. 

As every schoolboy has been taught, Boston is also 
the cradle of American civilization. But have all her col- 






245 



legians taken the opportunity to visit the historical land- 
marks which are scattered throughout the city? It is sur- 
prising how an actual tour of these historic sites can 
make history come to life for each individual. Those stu- 
dents who are here merely for four short years and who 
never walk the Freedom Trail create a void in that educa- 
tion for which they traveled to the historic city. 

For the student who takes the initiative, the rewards 
of Boston are invaluable. Returning to the "Hub" will al- 
ways be a happy remembrance of the past. 







246 




JESSICA TANDTT z 

HUME CRONYirzz 

ROSEMARY MURPtCt 

A DELICATE BALANa 









furksM^dcqftefpse 



247 



little mary sunshine 



Little Mary Sunshine, the first musical presented by the 
Boston College Dramatic Society, which is in its 101st 
season, brought us back to a time when the world was 
much simpler than ours is today. Good meant good, bad 
meant bad, virtue was all, and justice always triumphed. 
Rick Besoyan's delightful parody of the Jeanette Mac- 
donald-Nelson Eddy oldies, featuring Michael Lynott 
and Evelyn Cataldi, brought to Campion Hall overwhelm- 











248 



ing professionalism. The dancing, singing, comedy, and 
obvious dynamism of the cast were the ingredients re- 
sponsible for the productions success and its subsequent 
invitation to appear at Boston's Winterfest 1967. Little 
Mary's reception there definitely paralleled the enthusi- 
astic praise it had received at B.C. You've got to hand it 
to Little Mary Sunshine for providing such refreshing, 
artful entertainment. 





^^^^^^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^r 


SHH^^I 


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249 



winter weekend 



The Winter Weekend of 1967 coupled the biggest 
social event^of the winter season with the biggest basket- 
ball game of the year. The festivities began on Friday, 
February 17, with a semi-formal dance at the Meadows 
with The Remains supplying the "soul". The next after- 
noon was set aside for the Boathouse Bash at the Cam- 
bridge Boathouse where B.C. men and their dates 
received their "psych" for the big game along with liberal 
doses of music supplied by the Downbreakers and free 







250 



refreshments supplied by the Council of Resident Men. 
The focal point of the weekend had to be the B.C.- 
Providence basketball game at Roberts Center on Satur- 
day night. It was an event that will proudly be remem- 
bered by B.C. sports fans for years to come. The date 
section of the stands greeted the team with a shower of 
streamers which began the cheering that never ceased 
that night. Playing one of their finest first halves, the 
Eagles, sparked by Billy Evans, Ste ve Adelman, and 



Willie Wolters, beat Providence 83-82 despite All- 
American Jimmy Walker's usually great performance. 

Sunday featured a concert at Roberts Center by that 
country boy from Harvard, Tom Rush, who offered his 
polished folk routine. Playing on the same bill. The Junior 
Citizens displayed their own brand of talent that ranged 
from comedy to folk music 

Thus the curtain came down on an extremely success- 
ful, fun-filled weekend. 







251 



junior year abroad 



What was that year? What were those months of study 
in Europe? What was that experience all about? The 
answer to these questions is very elusive, very complex. 
For some, the year was a break from monotony. For 
others it was an opportunity for independence and grow- 
ing up. Yet, for all, it was something much more. The 
year was experience — going places, doing things, seeing 
for themselves. It sometimes became a giddy merry-go- 
round, a blur of sights, sounds, and faces. But after the 












252 



ride was over, the riders discovered that they were left 
with something very solid — a brand of education that 
books alone could never adequately furnish. 

Last year, ten Boston College students spent their 
junior year studying in various foreign cities. Pamela 
Fitzgerald studied English in Rome. Economics majors 
Charles Hauser, Joel Millonzi, and Bill Murray studied in 
Vienna. Joseph Jennings continued his studies in English 
at Caen. A Philosophy major, Patrick Madigan worked at 
Louvain University in France. Winner of the Campus 



Council scholarship for study abroad, Robert Penella 
spent the academic year in Naples pursuing a major in 
Classics. Alfred Sauliners studied Mathematics at Lou- 
vain. Carl Schaefer, an English major was in Munich. 
Brian Walsh studied Economics in Dublin. 

If you knew one of these people, perhaps you were 
treated to hours of stories and touring via pictures, but 
mere words cannot explain all that that year was. It can 
only be hoped that more students will be able to experi- 
ence its magic for themselves. 



«;^.^K^u:r:«..:. ^^.^^^m 





i \ i 




253 



education skits 



In early March, under the auspices of their Student 
Senate, the four classes of the School of Education pre- 
sented to the University their eleventh annual Inter-class 
Skit Competition. By every conceivable standard, the 
evening was truly a memorable one. 

"Who's Afraid of Juanita Chiquita Marita???", the 
presentation of the Sophomore Class, recounted the story 
of an ambitious senorita's attempts to find herself a boy- 
friend. With the help of her father's irresistible perfume 
and the support of a talented cast of classmates, the young 
Juanita eventually succeeded in capturing both the mata- 







254 




dor she loved and the applause of an appreciative 
audience. 

The perils of student teaching were delightfully paro- 
died in the senior skit, "Student Geisha". Depicting the 
disastrous homecoming of a small village's first and only 
geisha, the production culminated in an uproarious cari- 
cature of the troubles student teachers encounter. Win- 
ning costumes and outstanding choreography character- 
ized this skit, a surprisingly good one in view of the class' 
lack of adequate time for preparation. 

The Freshman Class offering, "Paradise Lost?", was 
decidedly amusing and really quite professional for a 



group witn so little experience. A cute little angel's 
successful antics in winning the "Big Boss" of hell were 
artfully portrayed in this rather arresting production. The 
acting, choreography, and music all contributed to this 
skit's warm reception. 

As for the juniors, only superlatives can describe their 
rendition of the "Making of a God 412 B.C." An im- 
probable Zeus, a patriotic Junobird, an indescribable 
Brunhilda, and an outlandish Athenian, Attilio by name, 
combined to make the Junior Class skit the biggest hit of 
the evening. Indeed, almost everything about this produc- 
tion was slick to the point of perfection. 







255 



sab/higgins 



In the spring of 1947 the Heights spouted a wooden 
structure which was in fact an authentic U.S. Army bar- 
racks. Originally intended to house campus activities, it 
first held classrooms and offices. Later, the Reserve 
Officers Training Corps commandeered it. Likewise, the 
Geology Department claimed a section of the unpreten- 
tious edifice for its laboratory facilities. Its walls also 
echoed with numerous Dramatic Society rehearsals and 
hectic deadline activity of the Heights staff. In the fall of 
1966, however, bulldozers and steam shovels devoured 
its military-like facade to break ground for the new Social 
Science Center. 






256 



Higgins Hall, the Biology and Physics Center at Boston 
College, is an integral part of B.C.s ambitious ten year 
development program. Completed in late 1 966, the build- 
ing marks the beginning of a new era for the Sciences 
here on the Heights. Generous contributions from numer- 
ous alumni and benefactors, grants from the National 
Science Foundation and the National Institute of Health, 
and assistance from the Federal Government made its 
construction possible. The building honors Mr. John P. 
Higgins of Arlington, Massachusetts, a long-standing 
friend of Mr. Stephen P. Mugar, one of the University's 
most generous benefactors. 



Despite the controversy that its architectural design 
has sparked, no one can deny that Higgins Hall filled the 
very pressing need for more adequate scientific facilities. 
Its one hundred thirty-six thousand square feet of class- 
room, laboratory, and research space alleviated the in- 
tolerable conditions that existed in Devlin Hall as a result 
of the overall expansion and growth of the University in 
the last forty years. Indeed, the new science center's very 
presence testifies most significantly to the progress and 
excellence which will continue to characterize the sci- 
ences at Boston College for many years to come. 




gjirtiw^.1 



j^- . - 1^--- 





257 






258 



rEASOlM 






V 





259 



cataldi in concert 






260 



On the night of March 12, 1967, Miss Evelyn Cataldi, 
a sophomore in the School of Education and a profes- 
sional folksinger, appeared in concert for the benefit of 
the B.C. Lay Apostolate Program. 

Charming the audience with her lighthearted show- 
manship, she sang a wide variety of popular folk songs 
which ranged from Bob Dylan's It Ain't Me, Babe to the 
Negro protest song. Oh Freedom. When the audience 
joined in Pack Up Your Sorrows, Roberts Center shook 
under their enthusiastic singing and clapping. This tempo 
continued during the second half of the show when, hav- 



ing switched from a full length pink gown to a very at- 
tractive miniskirt, Evelyn returned to finish the concert in 
a more "groovy" manner. In her own provocatively cute 
rendition of Hello, Hello, she charmed every male in the 
audience. The folk-rock atmosphere had the audience lit- 
erally swinging to the beat of the music. As the lights 
dimmed for the final time, the applause still lingered. 

But the audience was not alone in its appreciation. 
Speaking on behalf of the Lay Apostolate Program, 
Father David Cummiskey expressed his heartfelt appre- 
ciation. The financial success of this evening would trans- 
port B.C. apostles to their faraway missions. 






261 



middle earth 



This year the Heights witnessed the appearance of a 
campus coffeehouse. Middle Earth. Sponsored by the 
B.C. Council of Resident Men and directed by Bob 
Rebholz and Rene Durand, the creators of this new 
establishment were guided by two principles. They be- 
lieved that resident students deserved some sort of in- 
expensive, on-campus entertainment — someplace where 
the student without a car could bring a date for a pleasant 






262 



evening. Secondly, they strove to provide an enjoyable 
experience that was both socially broadening and in- 
tellectually stimulating. From these two aspirations 
emerged the coffeehouse. 

Entertainment ranges from live folk music on week- 
ends to dramatic workshop productions and poetry read- 
ing on weeknights. Some of this year's more frequent 
performers have been B.C.'s Evelyn Cataldi, Carol Bregar, 
Tom Power, Bob Handler, Bill Fischer, Carroll Delaney, 



and numerous others. 

This freshman season has proved highly successful. 
Next year promises to be even better with the initiation of 
an exchange program with other college coffeehouses: 
Middle Earth will then be able to feature folksingers from 
such schools as Brown, B.U., U.Mass, and Holy Cross. 
Thus, Middle Earth will become not only a center of B.C. 
campus life, but also an effective liaison between Boston 
College and the rest of the collegiate world. 







COME TO MIDDLE EARTH! 




263 



courtside club 



The 1966-67 basketball season was highlighted not 
only by an NCAA bid, but also by unparalleled student 
support. Several seniors envisioned organizing student 
supporters in an attempt to display to the team the 
students' unquestioning confidence in them. This dream 
was realized in the Courtside Club. Following the sugges- 
tion of Eagle coach Bob Cousy, the Athletic Association 
sold more than seven hundred season tickets at regular 
student rates to Club members. The efforts of this year's 
Club were well rewarded by an obviously confident team 
that completed the season by ranking first in the East. 





KKKi' iirr !i»iios 

WHEII ClOSCD 



264 



graduates 



ANTHOMY F. ABELL 


ALBERT ACKIL 


RICHARD J. AIELLO 


JOHN T. AGRESTO 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. English 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Political Science 


DAVID J. AHERN 


PETER M. ALBERICO 


ROBERT M. ALLEN 


JOSEPH P. ALVES 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. French 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Economics 


ELLIOTT W. AMICK, JR. 


RICHARD J. ANDERSON 


HENRY J. ANDROSKI 


PATRICIA L ANTON 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. History 


B.S. Nursing 





dh Aik 4)^ iM 




ik^ 




266 



MARSHALL ANTONIO 


M. ANGEL A. AREVALO 


PATRICIA A, ARTHURS 


DIANE ATKINSON 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. History 


JAMES F. ATKINSON 


HAROLD ATTRIDGE 


BRIAN M. AUSTIN 


VINCENT A. AVALLONE 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. Classics 


B S, Marketing 


B.S. Finance 


CARL A. AVENI 


MATTHEW J. AVITABILE 


RICHARD M. AYACHE 


THOMAS J. AZAR 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Geology 


A.B. Philosophy 







^g[kiki^ 



267 



KATHRYN MARY BABEL 


STEPHEN C. BACHLE 


JOHN F. BAICHI 


GERARD A. BAKER 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. English 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Accounting 


WILLIAM M. BALE 


WILLIAM G. BARBIERI 


PAUL J. BARNES 


ROBERT E. BARRETT 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


THOMAS J. BARRETT 


JOHN J. BARRY 


JOHN S. BARTLETT III 


WILLIAM E. BATES 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


A.B. English 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Production 







268 



JOHN J. BAUM 


JAMES F. BEATON 


GERALDINE C. BECK 


DENNIS E. BEHAN 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Physics 


B.S.English 


B.S. Speech-English 


B.S. Marketing 


ALBERT F. BELLIVEAU 


JEROME J. BELLO 


EDWARD J. BENE 


CHARLES A. BENEDICT 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


A.B. Modern Language 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. General Business 


ROBERT M. BENT 


RICHARD P. BERGAGNA 


RICHARD J. BEVILACQUA 


SR. BERNADETTE BEZAIRE 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Nursing 





'-^ as*' 



4&^A 



Ik 






269 



Good evening. 




271 



BRADFORD BIGHAM 


BRADLEY B. BILLINGS 


MARY K. BLACKWOOD 


JOHN H. BLAIR 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. iVlarketing 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Economics 


MICHAEL BLUMER 


ROBERT F. BODIO 


RONALD J. BOGNORE 


ARTHUR J. BORDUAS 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Mathematics 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Economics 


SALVATORE BOSCO 


CARMINE N. BOTTO 


EDWARD J. BOUCHEA 


PETER 0. BOULAIS 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Chemistry 


B.S. English 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Economics 




i Z 



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272 



MICHAEL K. BOURKE 


JOHN A. BOVE 


WILLIAM J. BOVITZ 


MARGARET BOWES 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


A.B.Slavic Studies 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


MICHAEL J. BOWLER 


CHARLES J. BOWSER, JR. 


JESS L BOWSER 


JOHN J. BOYLE 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


A.B. English 


A.B.English 


A.B. Theology 


B.S. Economics 


ARTHUR J. BRADLEY 


RICHARD J. BRADLEY, JR. 


THOMAS V. BRADY 


LEO D. BRANNELLY 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Economics 




r: 



*v 






273 



MARK E. BRANON 


STEPHEN B. BRANSFIELD 


JOHN H. BRAZILIAN 


PETER F. BRIDE 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Economics 


JOHN J. BRODY, JR. 


WILLIAM W. BROKOWSKI 


DAVID G. BROWN 


JOAN C. BROWNE 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


A.B. History 


B.S. English 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


WILLIAM J BRUNELLE 


MAUREEN BRUNNER 


CLAIRE J. BUDWITIS 


JOHN E, BURGOYNE, JR 


School of Education 


Evening College 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Speech-English 


A.B.English 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Production 









274 



JOHM P. BURKE 


SHEILA A. BURKE 


JOHN J. BURMS, JR. 


RICHARD F. BURNS 


Arts and Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Education 


A.B. Sociology 


B.S. Finance 


SUSAN E. BURI\IS 


JOHN A. BUSIWGER 


WILLIAM J. BUTLER III 


LYNDA L. BUTT 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. History 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Elementary Education 


ALAN L BUTTERS 


ARTHUR P. BYRNE 


THOMAS L. CAFARELLA 


RONALD F. CAHALY 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Production 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Finance 





^■> --^ \ 









275 



BENJAMIM J. CAKE 


JOHN R. CALF 


JAMES E. CALLAi\IAN III 


PETER A. CAMARRA 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Production 


BARBARA ANN CAMILLE 


GORDON L CAIVIPBELL 


WILLIAM P. CANTY, JR. 


DAVID C. CAPOBIANCO 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Classics 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Accounting 


RAYIVIOND J. CAPOBIANO 


JOSEPH A. CAPPADONA 


ANTHONY J. CAPRARO 


JOHN A. CARBONE 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Englisli 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Mathematics 








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I li ik 




276 



JUDITH CAREY 


THOMAS J. CARLYON 


DAVID J. CARR 


JOHN L CARR 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. History 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. English 


DAVID M. CARROLL 


ROBERT F. CARTWRIGHT, JR. 


JOAN MARIE CARUSO 


JOHN D. CARVEN 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


LEONARD M. CASEY 


EDWARD L CASHIN 


LEE V. CASSANELLI 


STEPHEN M. CASSIANI 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. History 


B.S. Geology 





^^\k 





111 





278 









279 



JOSEPH A. CATANZANO 


JOANNE M. CAVALLARO 


ROGER J. CAVALLO 


JAMES E. CAVANAUGH 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. English 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Mathematics 


THOMAS W. CECIL 


RICHARD R. CESATI II 


ARTHUR C. CHADWICK 


PETER S. CHAMBERLAIN 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


B.S. Physics 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. English 


B.S. Speech-English 


JOSEPH J. CHANDA 


BRUCE W. CHAPMAN 


PETER L CIAMPI 


JACK R. CIMPRICH 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Philosophy 


B.S. Physics 


B.S. Math., Chemistry 







280 



RAYMOND J. CIOCI 


KAREN CLAFLIN 


MARY E. CLANCY 


WILLIAM R. CLIFFORD 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Marketing 


CHRISTINE M. CLOCHER 


CAROL ANN COAKLEY 


JOSEPH E. COFFEY 


PATRICK J. COFFEY 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. English 


B.S, Chemistry 


CAROL A. COLAMARIA 


RAYMOND F. COLANGELO 


DENNIS M. COLEMAN 


ELLEN C. COLLINS 


School of Ectucation 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. Philosophy 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. History 






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281 



FRANCIS L. COLLINS 


JOHN J. COLLINS 


NANCY M. COLLINS 


RICHARD J. COLLINS 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Speech-English 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S, Marketing 


WILLIAM H. COLLINS 


WILLIAM J. CONCANNON 


JOHN R. CONKLIN 


JOHN B. CONNARTON, JR 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B.English 


B.S. English 


ELIZABETH A. CONNELLY 


JOHN B. CONNERS 


JOHN W. CONNERY 


DENNIS F. CONNOLLY 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. History 









is^ 








282 



FRANCES P. CONNOLLY 


JOHN □. CONNOLLY 


JOHN F. CONNOLLY 


WILLIAM M. CONNOLLY 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Production 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Biology 


WILLIAM R. CONNOLLY 


MARY E. CONNOR 


HARRY E. CONiyORS, JR. 


THOMAS F. CONNORS 


Business Administration 


Evening College 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Education 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Marketing 


RAYMOND CONSIDINE 


RICHARD F. CONWAY 


PAUL W. COOK 


ANN K. COSTELLO 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


A.B. English 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Marketmg 


B.S. Nursing 







ikmk 




283 






They have got to do something about this dust bowl! 




284 





Did you hear the one about the farmer's daughter? 





285 



BRIAN COSTELLO 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 



IVIARY E. COSTELLO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ANNE MARIE COTTER 
Graduate Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



WILLIAM D. COTTER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



EDWARD C. COTTLE 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 

JOHN P. CRADOCK 
Business Administration 
B.S. Production 



CARROLL J. COUGHUN 
School of Education 
B.S. Special Education 

PATRICIA A. CRAIGEN 
School of Education 
B.S. English 



JOHN P. COUGHLIN 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Physics 

ANNE L CREEDEN 
School of Education 
B.S. Elementary Education 



ALFRED C. COURNOYER 
Business Administration 
B.S. Economics 

JANET T. CRIMLISK 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 








tf.i 







286 



DAVID CRIMIVIINS 


ROGER L CROKE 


MARGARET A. CROOK 


JOHN D. CROWLEY 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. English 


B.S. Mathematics, Physics 


JOHN C. CULUNAN 


RICHARD A. CUMMINS 


MARGARET A. CUNNIFF 


ROBERT H. CUNNINGHAM 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Admmistration 


School ot Education 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. History 


B.S. Production 


B.S, Mathematics 


A.B. Economics 


ROBERT J. CUI\ININGHAIVI 


BROTHER MICHAEL CUPOLI 


CORNELIA L. CURRAN 


JOHN R. CURRAN 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Speech-English 


B.S. Finance 





287 



RICHARD J. CURRAN 


GEORGE F. CORRIVAN 


ANDREW P. CURRY 


THOMAS B. CURTIN 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. English 


A.B. History 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Physics, Philosophy 


THOMAS J. CUSKIE 


MARIANNE DACKO 


CAROL A. DAILEY 


JOHN JOSEPH DAILEY 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. French 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Production 


JOHIM S. DALEY 


MARTIN R. DALEY 


NORBERT W. DALKIEWICZ 


JOHN A. DAMICO 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Accounting 






288 



JENNIE R. DANIELE 
School of Education 
B.S. English 



ARTHUR A. DANIELS 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



LOUISE A. D'ANTONIO 
School of Education 
B.S. English 



STEPHEN B. DARR 
Business Administration 
B.S. Accounting 



MARIANNE T. DAVIS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHLEEN MARY DAWSON 
Graduate Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES P. DAY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B.English 



WILLIAM J. DeBERNARDIS 
Business Administration 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN J, DeCOLLIBUS 
Business Administration 
B.S. Accounting 



RICHARD DEFRONZO 
Business Administration 
B.S. Accounting 



CAROL LEE DEIANA 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CAROL A. DEITSCH 
Evening College 
B.S. Education 






289 



GEORGE F. DELANEY 


LEON J. DELANEY 


WILLIAM F. DELANEY 


MARIE E. DELANY 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Production 


A.B. History 


B.S. Nursing 


ANTHONY R. DeLUCA 


CAROL L. DeLUCA 


JOSEPH A. DeWlAMBRO 


JEREMIAH DeMICHAELIS 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B, History 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


NICHOLAS DeMINICO 


JOSEPH J. DENEEN 


JEANNE M. DERBA 


PETER B. DERVAN 


Evening College 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. Chemistry 






290 



RALPH F. DESENA 


CELIA C. DEVLIN 


LORRAINE DIAMOND 


GEORGE A. DIDDEN 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B.English 


ELIZABETH A. DIGGINS 


NANCY T. DiGREZIO 


THOMAS A. DILLON 


MICHAEL F. DiMARZO 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. English 


B.S. Mathematics 


A.B. Economics 


SALVATORE F. DiMASI 


SANDRA 1. DiMATTEO 


JULIE A. DiNATALE 


FRANCIS J. DINEEN 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. English 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Accounting 






^ Ah 




291 



Steve, PLEASE! 





You too, John. 




292 






293 



JAMES M. DINEEN 


JAMES F. X. DINNEEN 


ALESSANDRINA DISCHINO 


DENISE J. DIVVER 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


A.B. Modern Language 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Elementary Education 


ANNE K. DOHERTY 


BARRY C, W. DOHERTY 


EDWARD J. DOHERTY 


ELLEN T. DOHERTY 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. Mathematics, Philosophy 


A.B. English 


B.S. Nursing 


LEONARD J. DOHERTY 


PAUL F. DOHERTY 


ROBERT E. DOHERTY 


ROBERT K. DOHERTY 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Marketing 






294 



JOHN F. DOLAN 


NEIL Wl. DOLAN 


PAUL E. DOLAN 


JAIVIES E. DOMINICK 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Economics 


DOi\INA M. DOWAHUE 


BRIAN P. DONOHOE 


SUSAN M. DONOVAN 


WILLIAM J. DONOVAN 


School of l\lursing 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. History 


B.S. Special Education 


A.B. Political Science 


ANN M. DOOLIN 


CHERYL ANN DOUGLASS 


JOHN F. DOWNES 


JOHN J. DOWNEY 


Evening College 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Education 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Mathematics 


B.S. Economics 





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295 



MARY L. DOWNEY 


KAREN MARIE DOYLE 


RICHARD J. DOYLE 


PAUL F. DRISCOLL 


School of Nursing 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Production 


A.B. Psychology 


IVIARGUERITE P. DUFFY 


PAULA K. DUFFY 


DONNA E. DUGAN 


MICHAEL J. DUGGAIM 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Production 


KEVIN C. DUNFEY 


JEAN DUNN 


RICHARD J. DUNN 


WILLIAM D. DUNN 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. English 


B.S. Finance 




■ f 







296 



ARTHUR E. DURKIN, JR. 


WILLIAM J. DURKIN, JR. 


TERRENCE K. DWYER 


THOMAS E. DWYER 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. English 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Economics 


S. JOHN DWYER 


WILLIAM F. DWYER 


RICHARD F. DYNIA 


PAULA J. EDMONDS 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. English 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Speech-English 


MICHAEL G. EGGER 


FRANK J. EISENHART 


ELAINE ELENEWSKI 


RICHARD J. ELLIOTT 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


A.B. English 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Elementary-Speech 




^Am 






297 





298 




Get what? 





High there! 




299 



PATRICIA A. ELSON 


ANNE MARIE EMOND 


MICHAEL P. EQUI 


KATHLEEN ERCOLING 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Elementary Education 


DENISE M. ERICKSON 


LLOYD F. ERICKSON 


PAUL V. ERWIN 


FREDERICK C. FAHERTY 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. French 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Marketing 


HENRY A. FAHEY 


MARY J. FALLA 


EDWARD P. FALLON 


JOHN G. FALLON 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Geology 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. English 


A.B. Mathematics 






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300 



MARK P. FALONGA 


ROBERT W. FANNON 


PAUL H. FANTASIA 


MARIE ELLA FAUST 


Arts and Sciences 


Evening College 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


A.B.English 


A.B. History 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


ELLEN F. FEELEY 


JOHN M. FEENEY 


MARY PAMELA FEENEY 


PATRICIA A. FERACO 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Education 


B.S. Special Education 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. History 


CARROLL E. FERGUSON 


EDWARD J. FERRARONE 


BONNIE G. FIBKINS 


ELAINE A. FINNEGAN 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. English 







301 



FRANCIS A. FINNEGAN, JR. 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



ANGELA FIORE 
School of Education 
B.S. History 



ELIZABETH V. FIORE 

School of Education 

B.S, Elementary Education 



CAROL FIORENTINO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN H. FITZGERALD 11 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN J. FITZGERALD 
Business Administration 
B.S. Accounting 



PAMELA J. FITZGERALD 
School of Education 
B.S. English 



JOHN F. FITZGIBBONS 
Business Administration 
B.S. Economics 



JOHN R. FITZPATRICK 
Business Administration 
B.S. Accounting 



FREDERICK A. FIUMARA 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 



SR. SONIA M. FLANDERS 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



DOROTHY FLETCHER 
Graduate Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 






302 



CATHERINE FLYNN 


JOHN L FLYNN 


JOHN P. FLYNN 


PATRICIA A. FLYNN 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. History 


A.B. Sociology 


B.S. Elementary Education 


WILLIAM J. FLYNN 


CAROL L. FOLEY 


JOANNE FOLTS 


RONALD C. FONTAINE 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


B.S. Production 


B.S.English 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Accounting 


PAUL E. FORAND 


JOHN K. FORD 


KENNETH J. FORD 


WILLIAM P. FORD, JR. 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


A.B.English 


A.B. History 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Marketing 






^^Aii 







iL^iii^^ii 




303 



JOSEPH A. FORINA 


FRANCIS X. FOSTER, JR. 


JOAN E. FOSTER 


JOHN C. FOSTER 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. French 


A.B. History 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Physics 


DAVID S. FOWLER 


ERNEST W. FOWLER 


LINDA D. FOWLER 


THOMAS F. FOY 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S.English 


B.S. Finance 


B.S.English 


A.B. Economics 


JAMES E, FREDERICK 


DEMISE FRIGON 


JOHN C. FROHN 


CAROL ANN FRONC 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Mathematics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. French 





Aii A 





304 



RICHARD M. FRUCCI 


GORDON 1. FULLER 


RICHARD FULLER 


MARY T. FUSONI 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. English 


ROBERT J. GALIBOIS 


KATHRYN GALLAGHER 


HARRY W. GALLAGHER, JR. 


ELAINE E. GALLAHUE 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Nursing 


ROBERT J. GALLI 


MARY K. GALLGGLY 


SR. JANE DWYN GALLUP, S.G.M. 


PAUL J. GALVIN 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Marketing 







iM M 







305 



To you and yours. 



I'm sorry, Jackie. 






306 




Let's Leave! 





307 



JOHN T. GAMMON 


JOHN V. GARAVENTA 


HERBERT W. GARDNER 


MARY KATHLEEN GARTLAND 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Evening College 


Graduate Nursing 


A.B. History 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. General Business 


B.S. Nursing 


SUSAN RUTH GARVEY 


PAUL J. GARVIN 


JOHN P. GATELY, JR. 


GERALD L GAUGHAN 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. IMursing 


B.S, Biology 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Biology 


MARLENE A. GAUTHIER 


JAMES F. GAVIN 


WILLIAM F. GAVIN 


DAVID T. GAY 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Englisti 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Geology 


A.B. Economics 







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308 



GERALD L. GEAGAN 


JOSEPH J. GEIMEVICH 


SAMUEL L GEORGE 


PAUL G. GERETY 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Biology 


DONALD J. GERVAIS 


MICHAEL F. GIARRATANO 


PAUL R. GIBLIN 


FRAWCIS P. GIGLIO 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. History 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. General Business 


JOSEPH L GILBERT 


WILLIAM M. GILMORE 


ROBERT E. GINSBURG 


ELIZABETH G. GOETZ 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. French 




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309 



RICHARD G. GOLD 


TERENCE J. GORMAN 


BRIAN F. GORMLEY 


ALFRED S. GOSCINAK 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Psychology 


A.B. English 


A.B. History 


JAY R. GOTTLIEB 


MICHAEL W. GRANWEHR 


JOSEPH L GREANEY, JR. 


WILLIAM F. GREEN 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Evening College 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. English 


A.B. History 


JOANN M, GRENNAN 


ANTHONY J. GREY 


DENNIS M. GRIFFIN 


JAMES M. GRIFFIN 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. History 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. History 






iiikilii 





310 



TERRANCE J. GRIFFIN 


GERALD J. GRIPSHOVER 


MARTIN P. GROSS 


ROBERT V. GUARENTE 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Production 


JOSE GUARINO 


VIRGINIA IVI. GUDEJKO 


ELAINE A, GUENETTE 


BARBARA J. GUERRIERO 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


School of Education 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. English 


B.S. Special Education 


EDWARD J. GUILFDYLE 


HARRIS G. GUILMETTE 


JUDITH GUNDERSEN 


ROBERT J. GUNNIP 


Business Administration 


Evening College 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Social Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Sociology 






311 







312 







313 



JOHN F. GURRY. JR. 


LAWRENCE J. GUZZARDI 


FABIAN N. HAAK 


JAMES M. HACKING 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Economics 


■B.S. Chemistry 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. History 


MICHAEL J. HALEY 


MARY M. HALPIN 


SUSAN KAY HALTGN 


ROBERT A. HAMILTON 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Mathematics 


STEPHEN P. HAIVILET 


ROBERT M. HAMPTON 


ELLEN P. HANLEY 


PATRICIA-LOUISE HANNA 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Elementary-Speech 



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314 



J. KEMP HANNON 


PATRICIA HANNON 


JOHN V. HANSCOM 


ROSEMARY HARMON 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Elementary Education 


KATHLEEN T. HARRINGTON 


MARY E. HARRINGTON 


WILLIAM F. HARRIS 


JOHN J. HART 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Mathematics 


B.S. Elementary-Speech 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Accounting 


MAUREEN ANN HART 


JOHN T. HARTEN 


JAMES J. HARTFORD 


JOSEPH P. HARTIGAN 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Production 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Production 







mkmk 




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315 



JOSEPH D. HARVEY 


CHARLES R. HAUSER 


JAMES P. HAYES 


JOHN C. HEAD 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. English 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


MAUREEN LOUISE HEAFEY 


GEORGE W. HECK 


JUDITH M. HENDERSON 


EDWARD P. HENNEBERRY 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. History 


THOMAS J. HENNESSEY 


WILLIAM J. HENRY 


GERALD W. HERLIHY 


DOUGLAS J. HICE 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


A.B. History 


B.S. Spanish 


A.B. English 


B.S. Marketing 





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316 



JAMES J. HICKEY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 

JOSEPH C. HILL 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Physics 

JOHN J. HOARE 
Business Administration 
B.S. Economics 



GERARD E. HICKIViAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. IVIathematics 

ROBERT F. HINES 
Business Administration 
B.S. Production 

RICHARD C. HOCKMAN 
School of Education 
B.S. Special Education 



JOHN P. HIGGINS 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 

ROBERT J. HINES 
School of Education 
B.S. English 

KENNETH W. HOGAN 
School of Education 
B.S. Speech-English 



JOHN H. HILBERT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Classics 

DONNA K. HINRICHS 
School of Education 
B.S. Mathematics 

PATRICK J. HOGAN II 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 




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317 



HOWARD M. HOLMES 


DAVID P. HORGAN 


ELIZABETH HORMANN 


ANGELYN M. HORN 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Evening College 


School of Nursing 


A.B.English 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. English 


B.S. Nursing 


DAVID A. HORVAT 


MARGARET M. HOSEY 


JOHN F. HOWARD, JR. 


WILLIAM F. HOWARD 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Speech-English 


B.S. Finance 


JOHN J. HOYLE 


WALLACE N. HUBBARD 


WILLIAM T. HUBERT 


ELIZABETH F. HUGHES 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. English 





318 



JAMES A. HUGHES 


PAUL J. L HUGHES 


STEPHEN G. HURLEY 


JOANNE MARIE HYDE 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


A.B. English 


A.B. History 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Nursing 


ARTHUR F. HYDER 


ROBERT J. HYLAND 


VINCENT lACONO 


JOHN F. ITRI 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. English 


ARLENE R. JACQUETTE 


RICHARD M. JAEGER 


LEONARD J. JAMIOL 


GAIL A. JANSON 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. English 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Elementary Education 






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319 



events of the day 




One 














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320 



Three 




im 



Two 





321 



JOSEPH H. JENNINGS 


MICHAEL S. JEROME 


RONALD K. JERUTIS 


JANE A. JEWETT 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


A.B. English 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. English 


B.S. Elementary Education 


PETRA G. JOHNEN 


WOGDROW D. JOHNSON, JR. 


DONNA A. JORDAN 


RAE E. JORDAN 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


School of Education 


B.S. History 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Elementary Education 


JOHN A. JOURNALIST 


DONALD T. JOWORISAK 


MONICA K. JOYCE 


MARY ELIZABETH JUDGE 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Graduate Nursing 


B.S. Production 


A.B. History 


B.S. English 


B.S. Nursing 






322 



JUDITH F. KADLIK 


A. T. Wl. KALINDAWALO 


JOSEPH W. KANE 


PAULA KANE 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Nursing 


RICHARD F. KANE 


ROBERT A. KAI\IE 


DIANE F. KARD 


SUZANNE U. KAYSER 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Elementary-Speech 


B.S. Nursing 


ELIZABETH T. KEANEY 


MARY E. KEARNEY 


EILEEN M. KEARNS 


JOHN J. KEATING 


School of Education 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. Speech-English 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. Production 




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323 



MADELINE M. KEAVENEY 


MARIE HONOR KEEGAN 


RICHARD V. KEEGAN, JR. 


JOHN J. KEENAN 


School of Education 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Speech-English 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Accounting 


JOHN P. KEENAN 


RITA CHRISTINE KELEHER 


JOHN D. KELLEHER 


BRIAN H. KELLEY 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. History 


B.S. Economics 


JOSEPH G. KELLEY 


SUSAN M. KELLEY 


ROBERT J. KELLEY 


DANIEL E. KELLY 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B.English 


B.S.English 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Biology 






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324 



ELIZABETH A. KELLY 


GEORGE H. KELLY 


JOSEPH F. KELLY 


MARGARET V. KELLY 


School of Nursing 




Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 




A.B. Economics 


A.B. Theology 


B.S. Nursing 


KATHLEEN ANN 


KENNEDY 


FRANCIS M. KENNEDY 


HAROLD V. KENNEDY, JR. 


CAROLYN MARY KENNEY 


Graduate Nursing 




Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 




B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Nursing 


LEO P. KENNEY 




WILLIAM R. KERIVAN 


JAMES B. KERVICK 


JOSEPH G. KIELY 


Arts and Sciences 




Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Biology 




B.S. Economics 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Economics 






325 






326 




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327 



MICHAEL A. KIENER 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



RUTH M. KILLIOI\l 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN F. KING 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Wiathematics 



FREDERICK 0. KINSIViAN 
Business Administration 
B.S. Marketing 



FRANCIS T. KIRWIN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



WILLIAM T. KITLEY 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Psychology 



CHRIS P. KITLOWSKI 
Business Administration 
B.S. Economics 



ROBERT T. KLEINKNECHT 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 



THOMAS J. KOLLER 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



JOSEPH KOPKA 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



DEWNIS M. KOSTYK 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 



DIANE M. KOTTMYER 
School of Education 
B.S. Classics 






328 



ALEXANDER H. KRAJEWSKI 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 

BERNARD J. KRZYNOWEK 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 

JAIVIES M. lABBE 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 



JOSEPH FRANK KRASOWSKI 
Business Administration 
B.S. Accounting 

ROBERT J. KUPKA 
Scliool of Education 
B.S. History 

MARK S. LACHARITE 
Business Administration 
B.S. Production 



ANN IVl. KREIVIIVIELL 

School of Education 

B.S. Elementary Education 

JOSEPH T. KUREK 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 

WILLIAIVl J. LaCOUTURE 
Business Administration 
B.S. Marketing 



CAROL A. KRUEGER 
School of Education 
B.S. Special Education 

GORDON R. KUTZ, JR. 
Business Administration 
B.S. Marketing 

MICHAEL R. LaFONTAINE 

Arts and Sciences 

A.B. Political Science, Phil. 






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329 



PATRICIA C. LAKUSTA 


JOHN J. LAMBERT, JR. 


□AVID A. LANE 


PETER J. LANZA 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. History 


A.B. Economics 


PHILIP B. LAVELLE 


JAMES S. LAVENDER 


ANTHONY J. LaVOPA 


MARTIN J. LAWLER 


Evening College 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. General Business 


B.S. Speech-English 


A.B. English 


A.B. English 


JOSEPH F. LAWLESS 


JOHN A. LAWRENCE 


KEITH J. LAWRENCE 


WILLIAM J. LAWTON 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. History 


A.B. Psychology, Math 


A.B. Sociology 




AUMiM 









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I— 11 III 




330 



WILLIAM P. LEAHY 


JOHN C. LEARY 


JAMES T. LEAVITT 


THOMAS F. LEE, JR. 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


NORMAN E. LEEN, JR. 


JOHN A. LEMBREE 


ROGER J. LENNON 


JAMES M. LEONARD 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Accounting 


PATRICIA A. LEVERGOOD 


GERALD M. LEVINSON 


LESTER J. LIBBY 


MARY JANE LIDDELL 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. History 


B.S. Special Education 




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331 



PETER S. LINCOLN 


ANDREW E. LINDH 


ROBERT D. LINN, JR. 


JOHN W. UNOWSKI 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Chemistry 


fDMUND D. UPSON 


EDWARD J. LISTON 


JOANNE M. USTORTI 


JOSEPH A. LOBIONDO 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Accounting 


PATRICK P. LOFTUS 


SUSAN E. LOFTUS 


MARIE C. LOGAN 


RONALD E. LOGUE 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. English 


B.S. Production 




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332 



JUAN M. LOLI 


ROI\IALD L LOPER, JR. 


JUDITH E. LORDEIM 


MICHAEL C. LOUGHRAN 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B.English 


JAMES C. LOUNEY 


ROBERT F. LOVELY 


STEPHEN J. LOWE 


R. DENNIS LUDERER 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Sociology 


B.S. French 


A.B. Economics 


FREDERICK A. LUMINOSO 


MYLES J. LUWD 


MARIANNE LUTZ 


PAUL T. LYDON 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. English 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Economics 




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333 




Miller's High Life 




^^ 




334 



Just can't keep my mind on my work. 



|its B^g S;:e 
;Th^t Count > 









335 



CHARLES B. LYNCH 


DONALD F. LYNCH 


FRANCIS J. LYNCH 


JOHN M. LYONS 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. History 


A.B. History 


DONALD J. MacDONALD, JR. 


JOSEPH P. MacDONALD 


ROBERT S. MacDONALD 


PAUL W. MacKINNON, JR 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. English 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Biology 


PATRICK S. MADIGAN 


ROCCO A. MAGNOTTA 


BARBARA A. MAGUIRE 


MICHAEL B. MAGUIRE 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Philosophy 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. History 





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336 



GERARD J. MAHONEY 


KATHERINE ANNE MAHONEY 


MARY ANN P. MAHONEY 


MAUREEN MAHONEY 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Nursing 


Graduate Nursing 


B.S. IVlarketing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 


WALTER J, MAHONEY, JR. 


DANIEL R. MAHONY 


RONALD G. MAKARA 


DOUGLAS A. MALLON 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


A.B. English 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Finance 


PAUL J. MANDEVILLE 


KATHLEEN M. MANNING 


ROBERT A. MANNING 


MICHAEL J. MANNION 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. History 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Political Science 





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337 



JOHN F. WIANNIX 


DIANE M. MANSFIELD 


THOMAS C. MANTEGANI 


THOMAS A. MARCHITELLI 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. IVlarketing 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. English 


A.B. Sociology 


ROSS A. IVIARCOU 


JOSEPH P. MARIANl 


JOHN R. MARQUARD 


DONALD C. MARR, JR. 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Accounting 


WAYNE P. MARSHALL 


WILLIAM P. MARSHALL 


CATHERINE E. MARTIN 


RICHARD J. MARTIN 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. JVlathematics 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Modern Languages 




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338 



SHERYL L MARTINO 


PETER A. IVIARTO 


STEPHEN W. MASCENA 


PAUL F. MATULEWICZ 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Accounting 


BARRY W. MAWN 


MARION F, MAYR 


RICHARD B. McARDLE 


JEANNE E. McAULIFFE 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Elementary Education 


JOHN J. WIcAULIFFE 


KEVIN F McAULIFFE 


CAROL E. McCABE 


GEORGE F. McCABE 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


School of Education 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S, History 





339 



Holy Cross Ticket Line 






Nice Drawers! 




340 






341 



JOHN F. McCABE 


PETER J. McCABE 


EDWARD F. McCaffrey 


JAMES R. McCALL 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. English 


A.B. Political Science 


CHARLES F. McCANN 


JANE MARIE McCANN 


RICHARD F. McCARTE 


BEATRICE ANNE McCARTHY 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


EUGENE J. McCarthy, jr. 


JOHN H. McCarthy 


PATRICIA R. McCarthy 


RICHARD J. McCarthy 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. General Business 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. English 




342 



ROGER T. McCarthy 


wiLLiAivi D. McCarthy 


MICHAEL J. Mccarty 


JAMES F. McCGNVILLE 


Business Administration 


Evening College 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Production 


A.B. History 


A.B. Political Science 


MICHELE C. McCRANIM 


PATRICIA A. McCUE 


BRUCE J. McCUEN 


MARY M. McDAVITT 


School of IMursing 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Spanish 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Mathematics 


JOSEPH X. McDERIVIOTT 


KENNETH J. McDONNELL 


GEORGE P. Mcdonough 


MARY c. Mcdonough 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Chemistry 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Biology 






343 



MICHAEL w. Mcdonough 


KEVIN P. McDowell 


JAMES E. McENEANEY 


JEAN ELIZABETH McFADDEN 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Nursing 


ROBERT F. McGINN, JR. 


RICHARD C. McGINNIS 


DAVID S. McGOVERN 


PHILIP C. McGOVERN 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Philosophy 


A.B.English 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. History 


MARY ELLEN McGRATH 


ANN M. McGUIRE 


WILLIAM D. McHALE 


LEO A. McHUGH 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. French 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Economics 





344 



LEO F. MclNNESS 


ROBERT J. MclNTIRE 


RICHARDO A. McKAY 


WILLIAM R. McKENNA 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Marketing 


JAMES P. Mclaughlin 


MAUREEN A. McLOUGHUN 


HUGH J. McMACKIN 


DANIEL J. McMAHON 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Elementary-Sciech 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Finance 


JOSEPH V. McMAHON 


PAUL M. McMAHON 


RICHARD J. McMANUS 


ANN L. McNAMARA 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. English 






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345 



BRIAN W. McNAMARA 


SR. MARIA C. MclMAMERA 


JOHN J. McNAUGHT, JR. 


MICHAEL F. MELEEDY 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. History 


JOHN E. MELLYN, JR. 


WILLIAM H. MERIGAN 


FRANCES ALEX MESSINA 


JOANNE P. MIDDLETON 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Nursing 


DOUGLAS J. MILLER 


JOHN H. MILLER, JR. 


LOREN R. MILLER III 


JOEL C. MILLGNZI 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Economics 








346 



PATRICK T. MINIHAN 


RICHARD P. MINOGUE 


EDWARD MINOR 


CAROLYN J. MISKELL 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Nursing 


ROBERT K MITCHELL 


FRANK W. MITTON 


ROBERT MONIZ 


FRANCIS A. MOONEY 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Speech-English 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. English 


ROBERT L MOORE 


THOMAS B. MOORE 


RICHARD G. MORAN 


MARILYN E. MORENCY 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Slavic Studies 


B.S. Chemistry 


B.S. Elementary-Speech 





347 






348 






349 



JANE L. MORGAN 


MARGERY F. MORGAN 


NANCY M. MORGAN 


CLINTON D. MORRELL 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Mathematics 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


THERESA A. MORRIS 


ETTORE A. MORTARELLI 


RICHARD T MOSES 


STANISLAUS MROCZKOWSKI 


Evening College 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. English 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Classics 


SALVATORE V. MUCCI 


LUCY C. MUCINSKAS 


PETER MULCAHY 


EDWARD R. MULDOON 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. History 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Economics 




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350 



MICHAEL J. MULHOLLAND 


WILLIAM P. MULLER 


EDWIN MULREADY 


MARTIN F. MULVEY 


Arts and Sciences 




Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


A.B. English 




A.B. Slavic Studies 


A.B.English 


B.S, Production 


JOSEPH R. MURATORE, 


JR. 


DENIS F. MURPHY 


JANE E. MURPHY 


JOHN A. MURPHY 


Business Administration 




Evening College 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Finance 




B.S. General Business 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Political Science 


NEIL F. MURPHY 




PETER A. MURPHY 


RICHARD E. MURPHY 


ROBERT G. MURPHY, JR 


Arts and Sciences 




Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


A.B. History 




A.B. History 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Marketing 




351 



THOMAS W. MURPHY 


WALTER F. MURPHY 


JANICE M. MURRAY 


PHIUP C. MURRAY 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Marketmg 


B.S. Special Education 


A.B. Slavic Studies 


VINCENT A. MURRAY, JR. 


WILLIAM J. MURRAY 


WILLIAM B. MURRAY 


MARY-LOUISE MUSKALSKI 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


SR. LAURIANNA NAHM 


JOHN J. NANNICELLI, JR. 


PAUL K. NAPOLI 


MARY ELLEN NEYLON 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. English 





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352 



ANDREW F. NICOLETTA 


MICHAEL J. NOCERA 


JOSEPH W. NOLAN 


PAUL J. NOLAN 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


THOMAS J. I\I00NAI\I, JR, 


WILLIAM T. NOONAN 


WILLIAM H. NORRIS 


THEODORE L. NOVAKOWSKI 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Psychology 


ANTOINETTE M. NOVELLINE 


STANLEY P. NOWAK 


PAUL J. NUGENT 


ROBERT E. NURCZYNSKI 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 






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353 






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354 



I would have never thought it of Father. 







355 



CHERYL E. O'BRIEN 


FREDERICK T. O'BRIEN 


JOHN E. O'BRIEN 


STEPHEN T. O'BRIEN 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Elementary-Speech 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Biology 


WILLIAM F. O'BRIEN 


MICHAEL F. O'CONNELL 


RICHARD C. O'CONNELL, JR. 


KATHLEEN A. O'CONNOR 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Classics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S.French 


ROBERT P. O'CONNOR 


JOHN P. O'FLANAGAN 


DANIEL J. O'HARA 


LAWRENCE P. O'HARE 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Psychology 


A.B. Philosophy 


B.S. Finance 





356 



RICHARD M. O'HARE 


TIMOTHY R. O'KEEFE 


RICHARD L OKEN 


DENIS G'LEARY 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. IVlarketing 


A.B. History 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Economics 


JOHN P. OLEARY 


JOSEPH E. OLEARY 


THOMAS J. OlEARY 


GWYNNE OLMSTEAD 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


A.B. Engiisli 


A.B. History 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


JOHIM E. O'LOUGHLIN 


KEVIN J. O'MALLEY 


TERENCE P. O'MALLEY 


THEODORA G. ONDRECHEN 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Classics 


A.B. History 


B.S. English 








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357 



CHRISTOPHER V. O'NEIL 


DENNIS E. O'IMEIL 


BRIAN R. O'NEILL 


EVELYN M. O'NEILL 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. English 


B.S. Nursing 


FRANK M. O'NEILL 


MICHAEL R. O'NEILL 


PAULA A. ORBIE 


THOMAS P. O'REILLY 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. iVlarketing 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. History 


THOMAS M. ORMOND, JR. 


JOHN M. O'ROURKE 


WILLIAM 0. OSENTON 


J. PETER OSMOND 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


A.B. Slavic Studies 


A.B. English 


A.B. History 


B.S. Marketing 






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358 



M. ANITA OUELLETTE 
Evening College 
B.S. Education 

PHILIP PAIMAGROSSI 
Business Administration 
B.S. Accounting 

JOHN A. PATTI 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



EDWARD M. PADDEN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 

BURTIS G. PARCELS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B.English 

DAVID S. PAUL 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 



RONALD J. PAGLIERANI 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Physics 

VINCENT J. PARRELLA 
School of Education 
B.S. French 

MARTIN E. PAUL 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM R. PALMER II 
Business Administration 
B.S. Production 

CARL G. PARRILLO 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 

ROBERT T. PECCINI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. English 








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359 



RAYMOND L PECKHAM 


THOMAS M. PELLETIER 


ANN MARIE PENDERGAST 


ROBERT J. PENELLA 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics, Philosophy 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. Classics 


RICHARD A. PERRAS 


DAVID A. PESAPANE 


JAMES M. PETERS, JR. 


JOSEPH P. PETRO 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Evening College 


A.B.English 


B.S. Geology 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. History 


MARGARET M. PETROCCIONE 


MICHAEL G. PETRUZZIELLO 


LAWRENCE J. PEYSER 


ANDREW P. PHELAN 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Psychology 






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360 



NICHOLAS P. PICCIRILLO 


GILBERT J. PICKETT 


HAZEL J. PIELOCH 


JOHN F. PIETIG 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


Business Administration 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


WILLIAIVl A. PIRRAGLIA 


DENNIS A. PITTA 


PATRICIA A. PODD 


SANDRA L. POLMON 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Chemistry 


B.S. Mathematics 


B.S. Elementary Education 


MARK J. POOPOR 


ANIELLO PORCARO 


DONALD F. PORTANOVA 


JAIVIES C. PORTER 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


A.B. Sociology 


A.B.English 


B.S.English 


B.S. Accounting 




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361 




362 





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363 



SUSAN A. PORTER 


FIONA A. POWER 


STEPHEN C. POWER 


THOMAS E. POWER 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S.English 


B.S. History 


A.B. History 


A.B. Political Science 


BRIAN E. POWERS 


RICHARD E. POWERS 


RICHARD F. POWERS 


GARY G. PRUNIER 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. Economics 


WILLIAM J. PRUYN 


WILLIAM P. PUCCI 


HELEN PURCELL 


FRANCIS C. QUARATIELLG 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Elementary Education 


A.B. English 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Biology 







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364 



RICHARD M. QUIIMN 


PAUL M. RABBITT 


CYNTHIA L RAE 


MICHAEL A. RAMPOLLA 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. History 


ARTHUR RANDALL III 


ROBERT J. RANDO 


ROBERT J. RAU 


RICHARD N. RAYMOND 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B.English 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Production 


A.B. Economics 


TIMOTHY F. READY, JR. 


DAVID W. REARDON 


DENNIS J. REARDON 


ROBERT 1. REARDON, JR 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Marketmg 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Economics 






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365 



CLIFTON JAMES REGAN 


JAMES D REGAN III 


JO-ANNE REGAN 


DAVID F. REGISTER 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Physics 


LAIMA F. REID 


CHARLES J. REILLY 


THOMAS E. REILLY 


THOMAS H. REILLY 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Mathematics 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


RICHARD W. REIIMHARD 


VINCENT J. RENDA 


BENNY C. RENZELLA 


RGSEMARIE A. RENZULLO 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Elementary Education 






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366 



NORMAN M. RESHA 
Business Administration 
B.S. Finance 



JOSEPH 0. RICCI 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Sociology 



ALBERT H. RICCIO 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



EDWARD J. RIEHL 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Modern Language 



CAROL L RIETCHEL 
School of Education 
B.S. English 



WENDELL C. RING 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Political Sciences 



WILLIAM J. RISIO 
Business Administration 
B.S. Marketing 



DEMISE A. ROBERTO 
School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



RICHARD A. ROGALSKI 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JANET M. ROGERS 
School of Education 
B.S. Elementary Education 



MANUEL ROGERS. JR. 
Business Administration 
B.S. Production 



SISTER ALICE ROMANCHUK 
Graduate Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 






367 






369 



RAYMOND F. ROSS 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 


ALFRED F. ROSSI, JR. 
Business Administration 
B.S. Production 


EDWARD J. ROTCHFORD 
Business Administration 
B.S. Economics 


SHIRLEY ROY 
Graduate Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 


MARYANN E. RULLI 
School of l\lursing 
B.S. IMursing 


ELIZABETH M. RUSIECKI 
School of Education 
B.S.English 


0. MICHAEL RYAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. History 


JOHN J. RYAN 
Arts and Sciences 
A.B. Economics 


JUDITH A. RYAN 

School of Education 

B.S. Elementary Education 


WILLIAM F. RYAN 
Business Administration 
B.S. Marketing 


WILLIAM M. RYAN 
Business Administration 
B.S. Production 


JOHN M. SACCO 
Arts and Sciences 
B.S. Biology 






370 



FRANKLYN P. SALIMBENE 


WILLIAM C. SANDBERG 


LORAN J. SANFORD 


NICHOLAS SANNELLA 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Physics 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Biology 


JOSEPH M. SANO 


M. SANDRA SANTOLUCITO 


DAVID V. SANTOSUOSSO 


THOMAS M. SARKISIAN 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. History 


A.B. Sociology 


B.S. Marketing 


RAYMOND L SARNO 


ALFRED H. SAULNIERS 


ROBERT D. SBARRA 


LOUIS J. SCANLON, JR. 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. History 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Psychology 





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371 



PAUL F. SCARALTA 


SALVATORE P. SCELSO 


CARL F. SCHAEFER 


MARTHA L SCHAIT 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Biology 


A.B.English 


B.S. Elementary Education 


l\IOEL A. SCHAUB 


THOMAS H. SCHNEIDER 


PAUL A. SCHNEIDERHAN 


WILLIAM E. SCHOENFELD 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Geology 


B.S. Economics 


GERALD J. SCHUMACHER 


KAREI^ M. SCHWOERER 


GREGORY S. SCIME 


EDWARD A. SCRIBNER 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 







372 



JAMES F. SELVITELLA 


JACK H. SEMAR 


PAUL MICHAEL SENESI 


ROBERT J. SERGI 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. IVlarketing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Production 


WILLIAM J. SEROW 


ROBERT E. SHALGIAN 


PETER J. SHANLEY 


DONNA SHARP 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


EDWARD G. SHAUGHNESSY 


HENRY A. SHEA, JR. 


JOHN G. SHEA 


JUDITH M. SHEA 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 







373 






neocJers 



374 










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375 



MAUREEN T. SHEA 


JOHN F. SHEEHAN 


MICHAEL J. SHEEHY 


EDWARD J. SHERMAN 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Finance 


WILLIAIVi 1. SHERRY, JR. 


TIMOTHY J. SHEVLIN 


DAVID W. SHORES 


CARMEN A. SIGNES 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. Economics 


B.S.Spanish 


ALFRED F. SUVA, JR. 


JOSEPH F. SILVEY 


ANTONIO SIMOES, JR. 


JOHN J. SIMON 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Evening College 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Physics 


B.S. Education 


A.B. History 





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376 



RICHARD S SKOBLAR 


JOHN E. SKORKO 


ROBERT L. SLATTERY 


NANCY F. SLAUTA 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. English 


KEVIN M. SLYNE 


DAVID S. SMITH 


FRANCIS B. SMITH, JR. 


MARY T. SMITH 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Elementary Education 


BARBARA SMUDIN 


CAROLYN J. SNOW 


JOHN J, SOLERA 


KENNETH S. SOSKIN 


Graduate Nursing 


Evening College 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. History 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Marketing 







377 



FRANK B. SOUSA 


PAUL J. SOUZA 


LEO F. SPELLMAIM 


ROBERT J. SPENLINHAUER 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Finance 


KAREN L SPERANDIO 


MARTIN A. SPIEGEL 


KAREN ANN SPINKS 


EDITH STARR 


School of i\lursing 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Evening College 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S.English 


A.B. History 


RICHARD M. STAUNTON 


PHILLIP J. STEINKRAUSS 


MICHAEL L STEIR 


CAROL G. STENBERG 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Evening College 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Psychology 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. English 







378 



WILLIAM A. STETZ 


CHARLES A. STEWART 


ELLEN STEWART 


JOHN H. ST. GEORGE 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Marketing 


A.B. English 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Mathematics 


ROBERT E. ST. GERMAIN 


DAVID M. STILLMAN 


THOMAS G. STIRLING 


CATHERINE V. STRATFORD 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Elementary Education 


REGINA R. STRAUCHON 


LAWRENCE J. STRAW 


THEODORE H. STRONACH 


MARIE HELEN STURTEVANT 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Graduate School of Nursing 


B.S. History 


A.B. Political Science 


A.B. Philosophy 


B.S. Nursing 












379 



PAUL S. SUCKFULL 


BONITA JEAN SULLA 


ANNMARIE SULLIVAN 


DANIEL F. SULLIVAN 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. IMursing 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Economics 


DANIEL R. SULLIVAN 


DAVID J. SULLIVAN 


DAVID R. SULLIVAN 


DONALD L SULLIVAN 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Economics, Theology 


JAMES T. SULLIVAN 


JANE M. SULLIVAN 


JOSEPH P. SULLIVAN, JR. 


KATHLEEN M. SULLIVAN 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Nursing 






) 





380 



MOIRA A^ SULLIVAN 


PHILIP J. SULLIVAN. JR. 


ROBERT J. SULLIVAN 


WILLIAM C. SULLIVAN 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Production 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Economics 


WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN 


WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN 


JEANNE A. SUPPLE 


CHARLES J. SUTHERLAND 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. ProiJuction 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Mathematics 


B.S. Biology 


WALTER J. SWEENEY 


MITCHELL M. SWIERZ 


GEORGE S. SWYMER 


STEPHEN S. SZECKAS 


Business Administration 


Business Admmistration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Production 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Production 





iMmA 







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381 



peace . 




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382 






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383 



RONALD C. TALEWSKY 


IRA C. TARLIN 


JEFFREY M. TAUBER 


DANIEL P. TAWCZYNSKI 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


B.S. IVlarketing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Speech-English 


JOHN P, TERRANOVA 


PRISCILLE R. TESSIER 


GENE D. THERRIAULT 


LORRAINE E. THIBEAULT 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Mathematics 


B.S. Nursing 


PHILIPPE A. THIBOOEAU 


ROBERT J. THOMAS 


BRUCE J. THOMPSON 


ROBERT P. THOMPSON 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


A.B.English 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Sociology 


B.S. Accounting 







Ak ^ih mk dM 



384 



DOMINIC N. TIERI 


GILDA S. TIMMEL 


RICHARD S. TITILAH 


ROBERT B. TOBIASZ 


Arts and Sciences 


Evening College 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Economics 


PAUL A. TOMASETTI 


ELEANOR MARIE TOOHEY 


FRANCIS M. TOOMEY 


RICHARD T. TORTO 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S.English 


B.S. Finance 


AMTHONY N. TORTORELLA 


CHARLENE M. TRACY 


JOHN H. TRAVERSE 


MICHAEL F. TREACY 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. History 






385 



JOHN R. TREHY 


JOHN A. TRIBBLE 


NOREEN A. TROTTA 


KENNETH D. TUCKER 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Economics 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Physics 


R. DAVID TULEY 


BRIAN J. TUOHEY 


NANCY A. TUSZYNSKI 


DAVID P. TWOMEY 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. History 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Finance 


FRANCIS B. VanHAREN 


RICHARD F.VanHORN 


MICHAEL W. VASILY 


DENNIS A. VECCHIARELLO 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Production 






3S^ 






mM ^Mik 



386 



PEDRO VERDU 


FRANCIS J. VINCENT 


MICHAEL VIOLANTE 


GEORGE L. VIZVARY 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. History 


A.B. Economics 


A.B. Psychology 


ROBERT S. VOLI\IER 


CAROL ANN M. WAIS 


WILLIAM H. WALDRON, JR. 


ROBERT F. WALLWORK 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Accounting 


B.S. Special Education 


A.B. Philosophy 


B.S. Accounting 


BRIAN T. P. WALSH 


HUBERT IVi. WALSH 


THOMAS A. WALSH 


ROBERT A. WANTZ 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Accounting 


A.B. Psychology 


B.S. Production 





k dM 





urn 











387 



Good night! 




388 



BARBARA J. WARD 


JOHN A. WARD 


ALLEN C. WATKINS 


CHARLES C. WEAFER, JR 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


B.S.English 


B.S. Finance 


A.B. Economics 


B.S. Accounting 


ROI\IALD F. WEAFER 


JUDITH C. WEISEIMBERGER 


KATHLEEN M. WELCH 


WILLIAM F. WELCH 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Elementary Education 


B.S. Special Education 


B.S. Finance 


PAUL M, WEST 


ELAIWE M. WHITE 


JEFFREY A. WHITE 


THOMAS J. WHITE 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. English 


A.B. Classics 


A.B. Psychology 






390 



WILLIAM P. WHITE 


WILLIAM C. WHITE 


ROBERT D. WHITESIDE 


CAROLYN T. WHOOLEY 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Education 


Business Administration 


School of Nursing 


A.B. Political Science 


B.S. English 


B.S. Production 


B.S. Nursing 


ROBERT T. WILDE 


MARIE LOUISE WILDONER 


TIMOTHY J. WILLIAMS 


JUDITH M. WILSON 


School of Education 


Graduate Nursing 


Arts and Sciences 


School of Nursing 


B.S. History 


B.S. Nursing 


A.B. Philosophy 


B.S. Nursing 


JAMES A. WOLF 


PAULENE ANNE WONG 


SISTER M. ELIZABETH WOOD 


MARY ANNE WOODWARD 


Business Administration 


Graduate Nursing 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 


B.S. Nursing 






391 



BRUCE D. WORTHEN 


JOHN J. YACKUUCS 


JEREMIAH F. YORK 


JAN C. YUTZY 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Arts and Sciences 


A.B. English 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Marketing 


B.S. Physics 


CHARLES J. ZIAKOWSKI 


WILLIAM J. ZAINO 


WILLIAM J. ZAK 


FRANK A. ZAMMARCHI, JR 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Business Administration 


School of Education 


A.B. Philosophy 


A.B Philosophy 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Elementary Education 


BARRY Wl. ZIDE 


MICHAEL F. ZIDE 


ROBERT G. ZIMMERMAN 


MAUREEN P. ZOEHLER 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


Arts and Sciences 


B.S. Biology 


B.S. Biology 


A.B. Mathematics 


A.B. Theology 





392 






ads and patrons 



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Guy R. Abbate 

William S. Abell 

Mr. and Mrs. Abdallah Ackil 

Henry J. Ahern 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice B. Ahern 

Lena Aiello 

Michael R. Allen 

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L. E. Amann 

John J. Amero Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Americo Amodio 

Stepehn D. Amoroso 

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Mr. and Mrs. Frank Anzalotti 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Arnstein 

Harold W.Attridge,Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Austin 

Lawrence P. Avery 

Mr. and Mrs. William I. Bair 

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Mr. and Mrs. John T. Baran 

Paul E. Barber, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Barrett 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Barry 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Beaupre 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard W. Belter 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Bergogna 

Herbert Block 

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Mr. and Mrs. Francis A. Bodio 

Mr. and Mrs. Attilio E. Borsari 

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Mrs. Hugh Boswell 

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Wilfred J. Boudreau 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Bourke 

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Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Boyle, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Bradley 

Dr. and Mrs. Alfred W. Branca 

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Mr. and Mrs. James F. Brennan 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Brennan 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Brennan 



Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Breslin, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Brokowski 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernie A. Bromka 

Mrs. Francis Brown 

Joseph J. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan J. Browne 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley J. Bryk 

Arthur J. Buckley 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen C. Budwitis 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Burgoyne, Sr. 

Edward Burnett 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Businger 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. Butters 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Byrne 

Mrs. William P. Callahan 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony P. Camarra 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Capobianco 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carbone 

Salvatore E. Carbone 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert J. Carr 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. Carr 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Cartwright 

Peter L. Casalino 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Casey 

Edward V. Cashin 

John E. Castellini 

Louis V. Cataldi 

Stephen Cedorchuk 

Mr. and Mrs. George Chanda 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Chase 

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Clancy 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Clifford 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Clinton 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd A. Collins 

Francis L. Collins, Jr. 

T. W. Connell 

Matthew T. Connolly 

William F. Connolly 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. Connors 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard J. Considine 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Conway 

Mrs. Lionel Cormier 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Cotter 



Thomas J. Cudmore 

John D'Addario 

Walter S. Dalkiewicz 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Dalton 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Daniele 

Leo Darr 

James J. Dawson 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Day 

Joseph K. Dee Insurance Agency, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. John V. Delany 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph V. DeLuca 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Deluhery 

Mr. E. A. Derba 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph DeSena 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Diamond 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony DiBona 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Didden, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Dillon 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. DiMarzo 

George and Jean B. Dennison 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. DiPerna 

Hugh F. Doherty 

Gerald Donovan 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth T. Doran 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Dorff 

Francis Drohan 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Duffy 

Mrs. G. Richard Duffy 

Frank J. Dunn 

Dr. John J. W. Dunn 

Mr.and Mrs. William J. Durkin 

Mrs. Arthur H. Duvall 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Dwyer 

Thomas E. Dwyer 

John W. Egan 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Egger 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Eisert 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Elliott 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Ercolino 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Erwin 

William Evans 

James G. Faherty 

Salvatore M. Falonga 

Mr. and Mrs. Serafino Fantasia 



Dr. and Mrs. Rocko M. Fasanella 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Ferguson 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. E. FitzGerald 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis X. Foster 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward B. Frederick 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Frederico 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon A. Frigon 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Fronc 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Gartland 

Peter B. Gay 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Geisel 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Geswell 

Mr. and Mrs. Ignatius F. Giglio 

Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Granwehr 

Mr. and Mrs. Armand L. Graveline 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Grey 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hacking 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Halli 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Hanna 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Hannon 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Hannon 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Harmon 

Harold F. Harrigan 

A. J. Harrington, M.D. 

John M. Hazlin 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Head 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Helwick 

Mrs. Constance Hice 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman C. Hickman 

Joseph C. Higgins 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Hilbert 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice W. Hogan 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Horn 

Mrs. David J. Houston 

Mrs. John F. Howard 

Mr. and Mrs. George M. Hoyle 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Hughes 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Jacquette 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Jennings 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Jerutis 

Mr. and Mrs. Fernand E. Jette 

Robert C. Jordan 

A. Kabisaitis 

Mr. and Mrs. Miah Kearney 



John W. Keenan 

Mrs. George E. Kelley 

Robert J. Kelley 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Kelly 

John F. Kelly, M.D. 

Judge and Mrs. Paul Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Kervick 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. King 

Mrs. John W. King 

Mr. and Mrs. George Kinsman 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Kirwin 

H. M. Kline 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton P. Klish 

Michael Kostyk 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Krueger 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon R. Kutz 

Raymond A. LaCourse 

William Ladewig 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lakusta 

Mr. and Mrs. Clement Lanza 

Mr. and Mrs. George S. Lawton 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman E. Leen 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter Xavier Lehmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph LoBiondo 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent A. Lopez 

Mr. and Mrs. John Lorden 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Lydon 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent D. Maffei 

Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Mahoney 

E. F. Major Service Parts Systems, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mantegani 

Mr. John Marysz 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Mascena 

Mr. and Mrs Jeremiah F. McAuliffe 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence McCabe 

Mr. and Mrs. J. McCall 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis A. McCarte 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah McCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. McDermott 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph J. McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. McDowell 

John J. McLean 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. McGovern,Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. McGovern 



Mr. and Mrs. J. I. McGrath 

Hugh J. McMackin 

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William M. Meehan 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Mellyn, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Merigan 

Mrs. Salvatore J. Messina 

Ernest W. Middleton 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell E. Miller 

Major Edward T. Mitchell 

Dr. and Mrs. Bertram F. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucien A. Morin 

Arthur A. Muldoon 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Muratore 

Mrs. Donald C. Marr, Sr. 

Mr.and Mrs. Hugh J. Murphy 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. Murphy 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Murphy, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Nannicelli 

Representative John J. Navin 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Nelpi 

Arthur C. Nelson 

Captain O. B. Nelson, U.S.N., Ret. 

Mrs. George Newbury 

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William H. O'Brien 

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William D. Osenton 

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John and Mary Padden 

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Capt. and Mrs. George W. Parcels 

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Mr. and Mrs. Alva L. Peckham 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Pendergast 

Dr. and Mrs. James M. Peters 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Petroccione 



Mr. and Mrs. J. Claude Shea 

Michael J. Shea 

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Mr. and Mrs. William Sherry 

Mr. and Mrs. Emil M. Signes 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. Pietig 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Polmon 

Mrs Marie R. Portelance 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Procopio 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond L. Proulx 

Roger K. Prunier 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark R. Quinn 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Randall 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Reardon 

Capt. and Mrs. Allen B. Register 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Donald Reilly 

Armand J. Riccardo 

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Mr.and Mrs. Wendell C. Ring 

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Mr. John R. Rotchford 

Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Rulli 

Mr. and Mrs. Agostino Runci 

Fred W. Rusiecki 

Mr. and Mrs. Leiand G. Ryan 

Mr. and Mrs. William Ryan 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Sacco 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Sachs 

Rugo Santini 

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Sarantis 

Sarni Cleaners of Framingham Inc. 

Francis Scannell 

Salvatore Scelso, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Schaefer 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E. Schellhase 

Samuel J. Schoenfeld 

Dr. and Mrs. George C. Schulte 

John A. Schultheis 

Dr. Oscar J. Schwoerer 

Gregory Salvatore Scime 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis J. Scotto 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Shanley 

Edward Parr Sharp 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Silbersack 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred F. Silva 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Skoblar 

IMevin M. Smiley 

Mr. and Mrs. Terence P. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Snyder 

Mrs. Leo F. Spellman 

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James F. Stanton 

Mr. ana Mrs. James M. Staunton 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Stearns 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Stetz 

Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Stewart 

Mrs. Aldora Stronach 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Suckfull 

Mrs. Stella Sulla 

Daniel F. Sullivan 

Mrs. J. Burke Sullivan 

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Helen P. Tawczynski 

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Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Wall 

Dr. and Mrs. James R. Wall 

Mr. and Mrs. James T. Wallenta 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Walsh, Jr. 

Dr. Wm. L. Walsh 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert T. Wantz 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Ward, Jr. 

Harry G. Welch 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Wheeler, Jr. 

Captain and Mrs. Herman L. White 

William J. White, M.D. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Wolf 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold O. Wolff 

Wilhelm Wolters and Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wong 

Mrs. Harry J. Wunderlich 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Zinno 




Pino's 
Pizza House 

1920- A Beacon St. 
(Cleveland Circle) 
566-6468 

Come on down 
everyone knows it's 
^^' The Best Pizza in Town 

(Subs also!) 



SULLIVAN D.C. & CO., INC. 



Specialists in 

Industrial Security 
Undercover Operators — Guards 



24 HOUR SERVICE 
6 Beacon Street CApitol 7-0349 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

FOOD SERVICE 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

TO THE CLASS OF 1967 

from 

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1700 BEACON STREET 

LUNCH AND DINNER 

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Compliments of 
the 

JAMES A. HEALY AND SONS 
FUNERAL HOME 

Main Street 

Graniteville, Mass. 

692-6502 




JULIE ANDREWS 

., MILLIE 

CAROL CMANNING 
BEATRICE LILLIE 



Boston's Newest Concept 

in Luxury and Entertainment 

THE CIRCLE 

399 Chestnut Hill Avenue 
Brookline, Mass. 02146 



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C 
E 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE GOLD KEY SOCIETY 




S. S. PIERCE 

Importers & Grocers Since 1831 



S. S. PIERCE has become America's pace- 
setter for first quality food products and con- 
venient service. At S. S. Pierce stores, you 
will find adventure and excitement and a wide 
selection of unique foods and delicacies. 

S. S. PIERCE'S unequalled variety includes: 



Fine Foods 

Fresh Meats 

Frozen Foods 

Delicious Candies 



Wines, Liquors 

Cigars, Tobaccos 

Perfumes, Cosmetics 

Fresh Baked Pastries 



Festive Holiday Gifts 



BOSTON CAB COMPANY 



KEnmore 6-5010 



"The Brown and White Fleet" 



Boston Cab 
Brigham Cab 
Brighton Cab 
Cleveland Cab 



KEnmore 6-5010 



BEacon 2-5500 



STadium 2-2000 



ASpinwall 7-8700 



THE STUDENT SENATE 

of the 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

School of Education 

Extends its Congratulations 

to the 1967 

GRADUATING CLASS 

of 

BOSTON COLLEGE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

PAUL E. P. BURNS CO., INC. 

316 Summer Street 

Boston 10, Mass. 

ACADEMIC CAPS, GOWNS AND HOODS, 

CHOIR ROBES 

AND ACCESSORIES 

FOR SALE AND RENTALS 

LI 2-1513 LI 2-1514 

PAUL E. P. BURNS, '53 





HOME SUPPLY CO. 




HARDWARE • PAINTS • WALLPAPER 




LINOLEUMS 


WORLDS LARGEST 




TRANSMISSION SPECIALISTS 




AAMCO TRANSMISSIONS 


366 Washington Street 


433 MAIN STREET 




WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS 




924-0200 
LIFETIME GUARANTEE 


BRIGHTON, MASS. 


" 


STadium 2-0240 




ELI SOKOLOVE 



J. H. McNAMARA, INC. 



READY MIX CONCRETE 



SAND, GRAVEL and ROOFING GRAVEL 



298 NORTH HARVARD STREET 

ALLSTON, MASS. 

STadium 2-33 50 

TW 3-7562 



BROADWAY PACKAGE STORE 

60 BROADWAY 

NORWOOD, MASSACHUSETTS 

FINE WINES 

FOR FINE PEOPLE 


HOWLAND LINEN SUPPLY CO. 
INCORPORATED 

40 Bristol Street 
BOSTON 18, MASS. 

HAncock 6-6630-31-32 

Corner Rt. No. 28 and Bearse's Way 

HYANNIS, MASS. 

spring 5-2245 


Best Wishes 

M. B. FOSTER ELECTRIC CO. 

368 CONGRESS ST. 

BOSTON 

Electrical Contractors 

NEW HAVEN PORTSMOUTH 
CONNECTICUT NEW HAMPSHIRE 


JJ. C. W^IXWRIGHT 8c CO. 

Established 1868 

Members 

Boston and New York Stock Exchanges 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

60 State Street 

Boston 
120 Broadway 
New York 
Salem, Mass. 
Framingham, Mass. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 
Providence, R.I. 
Portland, Maine 
Lewiston, Maine 
Bangor, Maine 
Manchester, N.H. 
Keene, N.H. 



D. W. DUNN CO. 




Exclusive Metropolitan Boston Agent 
Aero Mayflower Transit Co., Inc. 



World-Wide Moving Service 



HAncock 6-8000 BOSTON 



Bob Dunn, '42 



Dan Dunn, '42 



RINGS 

PINS 

MEDALS 

CHARMS 

CUPS 

PLAQUES 

TROPHIES 



excellent 

design, 

skilled 

craftsmanship, 

superb 

quality. 



YOUR CLASS JEWELER 



DIEGES & CLUST 

226 PUBLIC ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
NEW YORK - PHILADELPHIA 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 




Compliments of 
Boston College * 
ROTC Brigade 



WELCOME 

TO THE 

CLASS OF 1967 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

ALUMNI HALL 

CHESTNUT HILL 

MASSACHUSETTS 



REPOINTING AND WATERPROOFING 

LEAKING MASONRY WALLS 

ABOVE GROUND 

CONCRETE RESTORATION 

MASONRY RESTORATION 

BUILDING CLEANING 

BIRDPROOFING 



w 



ESTERN 

ATERPROOFING CO., INC. 



BOSTON 02118 NEW YORK 10017 

ALBANY 12201 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1967 

From 

the book store 
Mcelroy commons • boston college 
the bookstore is a true academic branch of any university 

Textbooks • Required and Recommended 
Paperbacks From All Publishers • Reference Books 
Sportswear • Jewelry • Stationery • Glassware 

Greeting Cards • Supplies 
Boston College Songs Recorded by the University Chorale 
Classical & Popular Records 

GIFT items for ALUMNI AND FRIENDS 



Campus Gift Tray 
Cigarette Music Box 
Desk Clock 
Scrap Books 
College Pets 



Ceramic Coffee & Tea Set 

(five pieces) 

Desk Sets 
Ash Trays 
Campus Pillow 
Song Books 



BARNES & NOBLE 



INC. of MASS. 



FOR BOOKS 



We have the facilities to service all your book needs 



In Print or Out of Print 



■^NTIRE STOCK OPEN TO BROWSERS 

Over 10,000 Paperback titles, outline and review books, reference books. 



Our Specialty 

BUYING and SELUNG 

Used — TEXTBOOKS — New 



FINE BOOK BARGAINS 

On Sale on Our 
Feature Tables 



28 Boylston Street at Harvard Square 



UN 40640 



TYPEWRITERS — ADDING MACHINES 
Rented 

Sold 

Repaired 
PETER PAUL 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 

1 1 PINE STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 
TW 3-8920 



ATTENTION GRADUATING SENIORS: 

GET YOUR UNIFORMS AND 
FATIGUES FROM US NOW 

NO PAYMENT UNTIL YOU GO ON ACTIVE DUTY. 



All uniforms by Allied are approved by the Army Quality 
Control Board and are guaranteed for excellence of 
workmanship, materials, and correct fit. 



ALLIED UNIFORM COMPANY 
260 DOVER STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02118 
Telephone: 542-9600 
Outfitters of Boston College Army R.O.T.C. 




Tom, our results speak for themselves. The 
fmest printing organization in the East to- 
day for both science and industry is the 
Fandel Press. 

brochures • reports • letters • 

stationery • sales literature • 

labels • tags • business cards • 

checks • envelopes • business forms 




'a^u?^/ 




INC. 



59 McBRIDE STREET • JAMAICA PLAIN 
dial . . . 524-0203 



THE 



BOSTON COLLEGE 
BAND 

EXTENDS ITS CONGRATULATIONS 

AND BEST WISHES 

TO 

THE CLASS OF 1967 



MORENCY CARPET 

COMPANY, 1440 PURCHASE 

ST. — "AT THE COMMON" — 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

PHONE 617-994-3111 . . . 

ALL GRADES OF CARPETING 

AVAILABLE MADE INTO 

RUGS OR SOLD UNFINISHED 

AT, FACTORY PRICES 

AND SHIPPED TO ANY 

DESTINATION IN THE U. S. 

. . . NATIONALLY FAMOUS 

BRANDS FOR HOUSEHOLD, 

INSTITUTIONAL OR 

COMMERCIAL SERVICE 

. . . WRITE OR PHONE 

FOR QUOTATION. 



KftTHVCONNOU-Y 



A BCDEFGH IJK 



""f-^-^n^c"' 



^AA/\y\ji2' 







Must be a "MORENCY'' carpet! 



THE 


WARREN KAY VANTINE 


STUDIO, INC. 


OFFICIALLY SERVING 


The 1967 Sub Turri 


CHARTER COACH TOURS 


dxewlon-Waltham Jjank 


to Washington, D. C. 
and Montreal, Canada 


and C/rusI LyOmpanu 


PACKAGE TOURS FOR GROUPS 


S 
E 


to all points in the 
United States and Canada 


• Modern De Luxe Coaches 


• Friendly efficient service 

• Tour planning our specialty 

call 436-4100 for 


PERSONAL |{ CHECKING 
LOANS ACCOUNTS 

V 

SAVINGS EDUCATIONAL 
ACCOUNTS ' LOANS 

KB 


courteous information 

BRUSH HILL 
TRANSPORTATION COMPANY 


109 Norfolk Street, Dorchester 


N 


Lawrence A. Anzuoni 


G 


General Manager 
Agents for Plymouth and Brockton St. Railway 


\9 

Newton Waltham Wayland Weston 




Member F.D.I.C. 



TO CLASS OF 1967 



CONGRATULATIONS 



Superior Motor Transportation Co., Inc. 

Boston — Providence — Worcester 

"All that the name implies" 

GOODS INSURED WHILE IN TRANSIT 

MAIN OFFICE RHODE ISLAND OFFICE 

69-71 Proctor Street 350 Walcott Street 

ROXBURY, MASS. PAWTUCKET, R. I. 

Highlands 2-6666 PAwtucket 4-44CX) 




* 4 



^ 



• • 



'StttflV^^^^^H^ 




4, M Jltf^'-SS, v . StX' 




BEST WISHES TO THE 
CLASS OF 1967 

Newton Charter House 

Route 9 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 


Best Wishes of 
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent P. Roberts 



TO THE CLASS OF 67 

OUR SINCERE GOOD WISHES NOW AND 

FOR THE FUTURE 

THE SHERATON-PLAZA 
BOSTON 

H. de F. "Dan" Nyboe 
General Manager 







dtfuks - optttoort 
ItoliQii opt'rinltips 

Entertainment Nightly 

in our 

CLUB LOUNGE 

For Reservations Call 232-1749 
I 268 Boylston Street 
Just Two Blocks East 
Of The Charter House 

FUNCTION ROOM FOR 10 TO 100 





President 

Michael F. Mastronardi 
Vice President 

Joseph P. Kiely 



Compliments of 
THE BOSTON COLLEGE 

Council of Resident Men 



Treasurer 

Edward J. Ferrorone 
Secretary 

James L. Malone 



Alpha Kappa Psi Delta Eta Chapter. 



ROBERT J. LEONARD — President 
RICHARD F. KANE — Vice President 
JOHN A. DAMICO — Treasurer 
ROBERT F. W^ALLWORK — Secretary 
WILLIAM R. CO NNOLLY — Master 




COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

A FRIEND 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WVBC 

THE STUDENTS COMPANION FROM SUNRISE TO SUNSET 
AND THEN SOME 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS 

OF 1967 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

STUDENT SENATE 




Congratulations and 
best wishes to the 
Class of 1967 



from a friend of Boston College. 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF 1967 
FROM THE SENIOR INTERCLASS COUNCIL 

William J, Zak, Chairman 
J. Peter Gately Jr., Vice Chairman 
JoAnne Grennan, Secretary 
William E. Bates, Treasurer 




Congratulations and Best Wishes 
from 

The Student Senate 



College of Arts and Sciences 




CO 6-0222 




RUBY NEWMAN ORCHESTRAS 






COMPLIMENTS 


400 Commonwealth Avenue 


OF 


BOSTON, MASS. 


1423 COMMONWEALTH AVE. 
BRIGHTON, MASS. 


BILL CROSBY RUBY NEWMAN 





"The purpose of the Campus Council 
is to foster and promote the academic, 
cultural, spiritual, and physical welfare 
of the student body as a whole." 



CHAIRMAN — Patrick J. Murphy 
VICE CHAIRMAN — John Agresto 
SECRETARY — Carmen-Anita Signes 
TREASURER — Mary Gallooly 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1967 
DELTA KAPPA CHAPTER OF DELTA SIGMA PI 
PROFESSIONAL COMMERC^Mb^'^SINESS 




THE COZY CORNOR 

17 Shell Street 
S/asconsetj Massachusetts 

Finast Food aiid Fntertamment 
on the L/and 

Keasonabk Prices 



Compliments of the Management 



* n 



50C<>^ 



DINING AT THE HIGHLANDS IS DELIGHTFUL! 

We Serve Choice Beef Seafood Poulthy 

Our Service Is Superb 
Our Decor Is Charming 

COMl'LETE BANyUET FACILITIES 
FOU SOCIAL AND BUSINESS FUNCTIONS . . . 



s 



Entertainment Nightly 

Comjilimcntani llois D'Oeiivrcs Scried Daily 

5-7 P.M. in the CORK X BOTTLE LOINGK 

Sunday — 1'\mily I^av, Wednesday — Fashion Shows 




Eleven Fourteen Beacon St., Newton 4 Comers 
^^^^f^^Sg^ For Reservations: Tel. 332-4400 



Best Wishes 
from 

VALLE'S STEAK HOUSE 
ROUTE 9 CHESTNUT HILL NEWTON 

Famous 1-Lb. Broiled 

SIRLOIN STEAK $3.25 

EVERY WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY SPECIAL 

TWO 1-LB. MAINE LOBSTERS . . . $3.50 
Broiled, Boiled, or Baked Stuffed 

CHOICE OF MANY COMPLETE DINNERS 

Including Prime Rib Roast of Beef 

$1.95 to $4.50 



COMPLETE LUNCHEONS 



. 99c to $1.95 




ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



ALLES 



STEAK HOUSE 

NEWTON • Open 7 AM — 1 AM 
969-9160 



GARDEN CITY GRAVEL CORPORATION 

Radio Dispatched Service 

Shovel & Rubber Tire Loader Rental 

Sand • Gravel • Fill • Loam • Peat • Stone 

Church Street 
WESTON, MASS. 



Telephcme TW 4-1174 
If No Answer Call TW 7-8502 

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 365, Waltham, Massachusetts 

Owner: Louis W. Marinelli 




"Knowledge is proud fhaf he has learn'd so much; 
Wisdom is humble fhat he knows no more.' 

WILLIAM COWPER 



A message 
to the Class 
of 1967 
from five 
Boston College 
graduates 
and the 
company 
they serve. 




WILLIAM H. SULLIVAN, JR, '37 JOHN J. GRIFFIN. '35 
President Vice President 



JOSEPH F. TOWER, JR, '53 ROBERT F. LARKIN, '51 

Treasurer Sales Representative 



JOHN F. SULLIVAN, '59 
Sales Representative 



A 




METROPOLITAN PETROLEUM COMPANY 

500 NEPONSET AVENUE 'BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02122 •288-1100 
A DIVISION OF THE PITTSTON COMPANY 



Lheat 



The 



MARSHARD ORCHESTRAS 



The Outstanding Favorite of 



America's Universities 



73 Newbury Street, Boston New York 



KEnmore 6-5173 



Bar Harbor 



Congratulations to The Class of 1967 
from 

THE OLD VIENNA HOFBRAU 

music by the famous 

HOFBRAU ORCHESTRA 

* 

Singing Waiters 

Specializing in Parties and Banquets 

Showers — Weddings — Anniversaries 

* 

RATHSKELLER LOUNGE 

Fri. & Sat. — Banjo Band 
Sing-A-Long Trio 



Compliments 

of 

The Boston CoUei^e 

UNIVERSITY CHORALE 

C. Alexander Peloquin, 

conducting 



Compliments of a 
FRIEND 



....yearbooks created 
with enduring q^uality 




PEMBROOKE 



NEW ENGLAND YEARBOOKS • A DIVISION OF PEMBROOKE COMPANY INC. 

80 FARGO STREET • BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




index 



WlA 




arts and sciences 



BARRY, LAWRENCE 

39 Winfield St., Norwood, Massachusetts 



BURNS. FRANCIS M. 

1 9 Forrest Ave., Norwood, Massachusetts 



ABELL, ANTHONY F. 

25 West Kirke St., Chevy Chase, Maryland 



BARTLEH, JOHN S. Ill 

1 Paul Ave., W. Peabody, Massachusetts 



BURNS. JOHN J., JR. 

41 Lila Rd. Jamaica Plain. Massachusetts 



ACKIL, ALBERT 

35 Emmet Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 



BAUM, JOHN J. 

27 Hughes Ave., Rye. New York 



BUSINGER, JOHN A. 

164 East 226th St.. Euclid. Ohio 



AGRESTO. JOHN T. 

3 1 07 Avenue J, Brooklyn, New York 



BELLIVEAU. ALBERT F. 

14 Oliver St., Tewksbury, Massachusetts 



BYRNE. ARTHUR P. 

1 6 Lancaster St. Cambridge. Massachusetts 



ALBERICD, PETER M. 

1 8 Prentiss St., Watertown, Massachusetts 



BELLO, JEROME J. 

59 Congreve St., Roslindale. Massachusetts 



BYRNES, DANIEL P. 

5 Fox St.. Dorchester. Massachusetts 



ALEXANDER. ROBERT W. 

240 North Harvard St., Allston, Massachusetts 



BEVILACQUA. RICHARD J. 

3 Frank St., Woburn, Massachusetts 



CABRAL. DOUGLAS A. 

1 45 Chestnut St.. Fairhaven. Massachusetts 



ALVES, JOSEPH P. 

490 Noble Ave., Bridgeport, Connecticut 



BILLINGS. BRADLEY B. 

5729 Morningside Ave.. Dallas. Texas 



CAFARELLA. THOMAS L 

262 Crescent St., Waltham, Massachusetts 



ANDERSON, RICHARD J. 

239 Wentworth Ave.. Lowell, Massachusetts 



BOGNORE, RONALD J. 

1 9 Arlington St., Everett, Massachusetts 



CALLAHAN. LEO X. 

172 Cowper St. E. Boston. Massachusetts 



ANDROSKL HENRY J. 

262 Wakelee Ave., Ansonia, Connecticut 



BOSCO. SALVATORE 

121 AdmiralSt.,W. Haven, Connecticut 



CAMBPELL, GORDON L 

1 4 Faragut Ave.. Somervilie, Massachusetts 



AREVALO, M. ANGEL A. 
Atahualpa 1 044, Callao, Peru 



BOUCHEA. EDWARD J. 

1 1 Doris St. Dorchester, Massachusetts 



CAPPADONA, JOSEPH A 

68 Erie Ave., Newton Highlands. Massachusetts 



ATKINSON, JAMES F. 

25 Medford St., Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts 



BDURKE. MICHAEL K. 

1 7 Minnesota Ave.. Somervilie. Massachusetts 



CARBONE. JOHN A. 

25 Hillvale Rd.. Ajbertson. New York 



AHRIDGE, HAROLD 

21 Parkdale St., Somervilie. Massachusetts 



BOVITZ, WILLIAM J. 

1 02 Middlesex Ave., Wilmington. Massachusetts 



CARR, DAVID J. 

1 07 Cashin St., Lowell. Massachusetts 



AVENI. CARL A. 

3 1 Lynn Fells Pkwy., Melrose, Massachusetts 



BOWKER, STANLEY A. 

1 09 Anawan Ave., W. Roxhury, Massachusetts 



CARR. JOHN L 

74 Fresh Pond Pkwy.. Cambridge, Massachusetts 



AVITABILE, MAHHEW J. 

59 Oneida St., New Britain, Connecticut 



BOWLER. MICHAEL J. 

Steinman Ave., Middiebury, Connecticut 



CARTWRIGHT, ROBERT F. 
50 Plaza St. Brooklyn, New York 



AYACHE, RICHARD M. 

35 Congreve St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



BOWSER, CHARLES J.. JR. 

57 Exeter St.. Arlington. Massachusetts 



CARVEN. JOHN D. 

30 Beechcroft Rd.. Newton. Massachusetts 



AZAR, THOMAS J. 

75 Clifford St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 



BOWSER. JESS L 

53 Granger St.. Dorchester. Massachusetts 



CASEY, LEONARD M. 

1 8 Bonmar Circle. Auburndale, Massachusetts 



BACHLE, STEPHEN C. 

72 Moran Rd.. Grosse Pt. Farm, Michigan 



BRADLEY. ARTHUR J. 

41 Houghton St.. Dorchester, Massachusetts 



CASSANELLI, LEE V. 

210 Marmon St, Springfield, Massachusetts 



BALDASSARE, ANDREW R. 

22 Slocum Rd., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



BRADY. THOMAS V. 

1 1 Dorchester Lane. Riverside. Connecticut 



CASSIANI, STEPHEN M. 

36 Loyed Ave., Brockton, Massachusetts 



BANFIELD, TIMOTHY J. 

1 4 Ellsworth St.. Somervilie, Massachusetts 



BRANNELLY, LEO D. 

691 W. Roxbury Pkwy., Boston, Massachusetts 



CATANZANO, JOSEPH A. 

75 Mary St, Arlington, Massachusetts 



BARNHART, ROY J. 

80 Winton Rd., Fairfield, Connecticut 



BRANDN, MARK E. 

1 6 West Passaic Ave., Rutherford, New Jersey 



CAVALLO, ROGER J. 

18 A Melvin St, Somervilie, Massachusetts 



BARRETT, ROBERT E. 

29 Valley Rd., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



BRODY, JOHN J., JR. 

709 S. Lindell Rd., Greensboro, North Carolina 



CECIL, THOMAS W. 

9 1 6 McKewin Ave., Baltimore, Maryland 



BARRETT, THOMAS J. 

22 Phillips Circle, Swampscott, Massachusetts 



BURKE, JOHN P. 

1 1 8 Wentworth Ave., Lowell, Massachusetts 



CESATI. RICHARD R.II 

3 Conry Crescent Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



CHANDA, JOSEPH J. 

300 Union Ave., Clifton, IMew Jersey 



CUPULI, BRO IVIICHAEL 

Sons of iVIary, Framingham, IVIassacfiusetts 



DOHERTY, BARRY C. 

28 Brae Burn Rd., Milton, Massachusetts 



CHAPMAN, BRUCE W. 

13 Waban St., Mewton, Massachusetts 



CURRIVAN, GEORGE F. 

2 Gray Rd.. Foxboro, Massachusetts 



DOHERTY, EDWARD J. 

38 Greaton Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



CHISHOLM, CHARLES J, 

56A Flint St., Somerville, Massachusetts 



CURTIIM, THOMAS B. 

607 Sheridan Ave,, Roselle Park, New Jersey 



DOHERTY, PAUL F. 

8 Kent St., Saugus, Massachusetts 



CIAMPI, PETER L 

61 Waldemar Ave., E. Boston. Massachusetts 



DALEY, JOHN S. 

Tioga Lane, Pleasantville, New York 



DOHERTY, ROBERT E. 

1 4 Elda Rd., Framingham, Massachusetts 



CIMPRICH, JACK R. 

7823 Bergenline Ave., N Bergen, New Jersey 



DANIELS, ARTHUR A. 

41 8 Ridge St., Arlington, Massachusetts 



DOMINICK, JAMES E. 

1 2 Heather St., Manchester. New Hampshire 



COFFEY, JOSEPH E. 

77 Oriole St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



DASCOLI. GARY J 

9 Staples Ave.. Everett. Massachusetts 



DONOVAN, WILLIAM J. 

206 West Phillip St.. Coaldale. Pennsylvania 



COFFEY, PATRICK J. 

7331 Northmoor Rd., University City, Missouri 



DAY, JAMES P. 

301 7 Riverdale Ave., New York, New York 



DRISCOLL, PAUL F. 

87 Chittick Rd., Hyde Park. Massachusetts 



COLANGELO. RAYMOND F. 

1 208 Chillum Manor Rd., Hyattsville, Maryland 



DELANEY, WILLIAM F. 

70 Adams St., Dedham, Massachusetts 



DUNFEY, KEVIN C. 

90 Trowbridge Circle, Stoughton, Massachusetts 



COLEMAN. DENNIS M, 

33 Long Ave.. Boston. Massachusetts 



DELUCA. ANTHONY R. 

55 Chadwick St.. Bradford. Massachusetts 



DUNN. PAUL M. 

350 A Rindge Ave.. Cambridge. Massachusetts 



COLLINS. FRANCIS L 

272 Valentine St., Fall River, Massachusetts 



DELUCA, ROBERT J. 

24 Alder St., Lawrence. Massachusetts 



DUNN. WILLIAM J. 

1 27 Rockland Ave., Maiden, Massachusetts 



CONKLIN, JOHN R. 

1 5 Orvis Rd., Arlington, Massachusetts 



DEMICHAELIS, JEREMIAH 
7162NilesAve..Niles. Illinois 



DURKIN, WILLIAM J.,JR. 

1 0009 Belhaven Rd., Bethesda. Maryland 



CONNERS, JOHN B. 

1 22 Summer St., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 



DENEEN, JOSEPH J 

66 Robbins Rd., Watertown. Massachusetts 



DYNIA. RICHARD F. 

88 Clark St.. New Haven, Connecticut 



CONNOLLY, JOHN F. 

1 1 Vandergrift St., Lawrence, Massachusetts 



DENNEHY. FREDERICK J. 

1 1 1 5 Delmar Ave., Franklin Square. New York 



EATON. FRANCIS A. 

593 Dudley St.. Dorchester. Massachusetts 



CONNOLLY. WILLIAM M. 

366 Beacon St., Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 



DENNISON, GEORGE V. 

238 West 1 1th St., New York, New York 



EGGER, MICHAEL G. 

1477 Potter Lane, Wayne. Pennsylvania 



CONSIDINE, RAYMOND 

50 Laurel Dr., New Hyde Park, New York 



DERVAN, PETER B. 

62 Welles Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



EOUl, MICHAEL P. 

21 Allyn St., Holyoke, Massachusetts 



COTTER, WILLIAM 0. 

7 Park Lane, Westport, Connecticut 



DESENA, RALPH F 

1469 West Ave.. Bronx. New York 



ERWIN. PAUL V. 

1 8 Pleasant View Ave., E. Braintree, Massachusetts 



COTTLE, EDWARD C. 

56 Kingsbury St , Needham. Massachusetts 



DIBONA. ROBERT 

121 Florence Rd.Waltham, Massachusetts 



FAHEY, HENRY A. 

438 East Sixth St., S. Boston, Massachusetts 



COUGHLIN, JOHN P. 

177 Meadows End Rd., Milford, Connecticut 



DIDDEN, GEORGE A. 

4222 42nd St., N.W., Washington, DC. 



FALLON, EDWARD P. 

82 Proctor St.. Salem. Massachusetts 



CRIMMINS, DAVID 

30 Woodbrier Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



DIMARZO, MICHAEL F. 

40 Andrews St., Norwood, Massachusetts 



FALLON, JOHN G. 

2 1 8 Ashcroft Rd., Medford, Massachusetts 



CROWLEY, JOHN 0. 

225 Whitford Ave., Nutley, New Jersey 



DIMAURO, RONALD J 

20 Queensbury St., Boston, Massachusetts 



FALONGA, MARK P. 

87-18 87th St., Woodhaven, New York 



CULLINAN, JOHN C. 

1 27 Old Brook Rd., Springfield, Massachusetts 



DINEEN, JAMES M. 

39 Love Lane. Kittery. Maine 



FEENEY. JOHN M. 

38 Howard St.. Portland. Maine 



CUNNINGHAM, ROBERT H, 

38 Cedar St., Mattapan, Massachusetts 



DINNEEN, JAMES F. X. 

2 1 Hilltop St., Milton, Massachusetts 



FERRARONE, EDWARD J. 

35 Wendover Rd., Springfield, Massachusetts 



FII\II\IEGAI\I, FRANCIS A., JR. 
27 Second St., Bangor, Maine 



FLYNN, JOHN L 

1715 Astor Ave., Bronx, New York 



GIBLIN, PAUL R. 

5 Hidden Rd., Andouer, iVIassachusetts 



GOEPFERT, PAUL L. 

747 Berkeley Ave., Orange, New Jersey 



HALEY, MICHAEL J. 

1 6 Upland Ave., White Plains, New York 



HAMILTON, ROBERT A. 

46 Brookmoor Rd., W Hartford. Connecticut 



FLYNN, JOHN P. 

202 Edge Hill Rd., Milton, Massachusetts 



FOLEY. GERARD J. 

1 334 River St., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 



FORAND, PAUL E. 

33 Orchard St., Southbridge, Massachusetts 



FORD, JOHN K. 

1 2 Moultrie St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



GOLD, RICHARD G. 

Woodland Rd., Greenvillage, New Jersey 



GORMAN, TERENCE J 

88 Mt. Vernon St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 



GORMLEY, BRIAN F. 

16 Ox Yoke Lane, Norwalk, Connecticut 



GOSCINAK, ALFRED S. 

70 Cedar St., Somerville, Massachusetts 



HAMMOND, EDWARD R. Ill 

630 East Wishart St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



HAMPTON, ROBERT M. 

216 Temple St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



HANNON, J. KEMP 

41 Kenwood Rd., Garden City, New York 



HARRINGTON, RICHARD D. 

1 670 Grand Ave., Baldwin, New York 



FOSTER, FRANCIS X., JR. 

1 2 Merrill St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

FOSTER, JOHN C. 

206 Elmtree Rd., Rochester, New York 

FOY, THOMAS F. 

1 5 Cambridge Ave., Bethpage, New York 

GALIBOIS, ROBERT J. 

353 Beacon St., Somerville, Massachusetts 

GALLAGHER, VINCENT P. 

549 8 1 st St., Brooklyn, New York 

GALLI, ROBERT J. 

17 Grove St., Torrington, Connecticut 

GANNON, JOHN T. 

1 950 McGraw Ave., Bronx, New York 

GARAVENTA, JOHN V. 

97 Muriel Ter., Haverhill, Massachusetts 

GARVIN, PAUL J. 

46 Norton St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

GATELY, JOHN P., JR. 

58 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

GAUGHAN, GERARD L 

60 Montclair Ave., Ouincy, Massachusetts 

GAVIN, WILLIAM F. 

217 High St., Hingham, Massachusetts 

GAY, DAVID T. 

1 Whitehill St., Taunton, Massachusetts 

GEORGE, SAMUEL L 

33 High St., Methuen, Massachusetts 

GERETY, PAUL G. 

13 Autumn St., Everett, Massachusetts 



GOTTLIEB, JAY R. 

34 Blaney St., Revere, Massachusetts 

GRADY, PAUL F. 

1 8 Blosson Hill Rd., Winchester, Massachusetts 

GREEN, BARRY E. 

720 Huntington Tnpk., Bridgeport, Connecticut 

GREEN, BARRY E. 

720 Huntinghton Tnpk., Bridgeport, Connecticut 

GREEN, WILLIAM F. 

92 Alpheus Rd., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

GREY, ANTHONY J. 

1558 Union St., Schenectady, New York 

GRIFFIN, DENNIS M. 

31 Lincoln St., Winchester, Massachusetts 

GRIFFIN, JAMES M. 

3 Shields St., Woburn, Massachusetts 

GRIFFIN, TERRENCE J. 

1 1 Coral St., Lowell, Massachusetts 

GRIPSHOVER, GERALD J. 

140 Spring St., Watertown, Massachusetts 

GROSS, MARTIN P. 

Elm Ave., Gloucester. Massachusetts 

GUARINO, JOSE 

27 Running Brook Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

GUNNIP, ROBERT J. 

529 Rathbury Rd., Wilmington, Deleware 

GUYETTE, ROGER W., JR. 

53 Cedar St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

GUZZARDI, LAWRENCE J. 

250 South 1 3th St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



HARRIS, WILLIAM F. 

21 Stubtoe Lane, Sudbury, Massachusetts 



HARTFORD, JAMES J. 

82 Grove Circle, Braintree, Massachusetts 



HECK, GEORGE W. 

283 Kings Hghwy., Tappan, New York 



HENNEBERRY, EDWARD P. 

20 Nashoba Rd., W. Acton, Massachusetts 



HENNESSEY, THOMAS J. 

297 Plainfield St., Hartford, Connecticut 



HERLIHY, GERARD W. 

9 Euclid Ave., Bradford, Massachusetts 



HICKEY, JAMES J. 

2 Eddie St., Ouincy, Massachusetts 



HICKMAN, GERARD E. 

77'46 79th St., Glendale, New York 



HILBERT, JOHN H. 

44 Beech St., Maywood, New Jersey 



HILL, JOSEPH C. 

20 Prescott St., Roxbury, Massachusetts 



HOGAN, PATRICK, J. II 

74 Seyms St., Hartford, Connecticut 



HOLMES, HOWARD M. 

3707 Cassen Rd., Randallstown, Maryland 



HORVAT, DAVID A. 

66 Franklin St., Danielson, Connecticut 



HOWARD, WILLIAM, JR. 

61 Willow St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 



HUBBARD, WALLACE N. 

44 Harding Rd., Melrose, Massachusetts 



GIARRATANO, MICHAEL F. 

1 1 Beckett St., Danbury. Connecticut 



HACKING. JAMES M. 

330 Hyde St., Fall River, Massachusetts 



HUGHES, JAMES A. 

Garth Woods Apt. 2-D, Scarsdale, New York 



HUGHES, PAUL J. L 

86 Ardale St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



KLEINKNECHT, ROBERT T. 

930 Wildwood Rd., Oradell, New Jersey 



LEAVITT, JAMES T. 

207 Glenwood St., Manchester, Connecticut 



HYDER, ARTHUR F. 

57 Wall St., Quincy, Massachusetts 



KOBBS, FRANCIS A. 

1 4 Church St., Natick, Massachusetts 



LEE, THOMAS F., JR. 

66 Wooster Hgts., Danbury, Connecticut 



lACONO, VINCENT 

1 2 Thorndlke St., Revere, Massachusetts 



KOLLER, THOMAS J. 

1 744 Highland Ave., Rochester, New York 



LENNON, ROGER J. 

83 Hawthorn PL, Briarcliff Manor, New York 



ITRI, JOHN F. 

240 1 82nd St., Brooklyn, New York 



KOPKA, JOSEPH 

292 Douglas Ave., Providence, Rhode Island 



LESKOSKY, RICHARD J. 

1323 Winstanley Ave., East St. Louis, Illinois 



JAEGER, RICHARD M. 

9265 Shore Rd., Brooklyn, New York 



KOSTYK, DENNIS M. 

1 23 Bridge Ave., Cohoes, New York 



LIBBY, LESTER J. 

1 16 Austin St., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 



JENNINGS, JOSEPH H. 

1 1 2 Old Mill Rd,. Fairfield, Connecticut 



KOVAR, JOHN L, JR. 

104 Union St., Natick, Massachusetts 



LINCOLN, PETER S. 

43 Fay Rd., Scituate, Massachusetts 



JERUTIS, RONALD K. 

1616Mann Helm Rd., Westchester, Illinois 



KUREK, JOSEPH T. 

2233 Wharton Rd., Glenside, Pennsylvania 



LINDH, ANDREW E. 

365 Forest Ave., Middletown, Rhode Island 



JETTE, ERNEST A. 

4 Houde St., Nashua, New Hampshire 



L'ABBE, JAMES M. 

14-1/2 Belmont Ave, Waterville, Maine 



LINOWSKI, JOHN W. 

30 Fulton St., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 



JOWORISAK, DONALD T. 

66 Clifton PL, Jersey City, New Jersey 



LAFONTAINE, MICHAEL R. 

43 Vine St., Nashua, New Hampshire 



LOPER, ROLAND L, JR. 

55 Spruce Rd., Norwood, Massachusetts 



KALINDAWALO, A. T. M. 

P 0. Box 2, Zomba, Malawi, Africa 



LANCE, TIMOTHY L. 

1 1 8 Red Fox Rd., Stamford, Connecticut 



LOUGHRAN, MICHAEL C. 

279 Pleasant St., Canton, Massachusetts 



KANE, ROBERT A. 

2 1 7 Spring St., Brockton, Massachusetts 



LANE, DAVID A. 

374 Lebanon St., Melrose, Massachusetts 



LOUGHRAN, THOMAS F. 

131 London St., Lowell, Massachusetts 



KEITH, ROGER W. 

38 Grove St., Lynn, Massachusetts 



LANZA, PETER J. 

1 237 Central St., Leominster, Massachusetts 



LOVELY, ROBERT F. 

1 1 Waverly PL, Newton, Massachusetts 



KELLEY, JOSEPH G. 

7 Beechwood Rd., Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey 



LARGESS, ROBERT P. 

1 908 Ouincy St., Washington, D.C. 



LUDERER, R. DENNIS 

1 03 Pleasant Ave., Bergenfield, New Jersey 



KELLY, DANIEL E. 

24 Webster Rd., Braintree, Massachusetts 



LAVOPA, ANTHONY J. 

2435 Frisby Ave., Bronx, New York 



LUMINOSO, FREDERICK A. 

177 Belltown Rd., Stamford, Connecticut 



KELLY, GEORGE H, 

977 South Meriden Rd., Cheshire, Connecticut 



LAVRAKAS, PAUL A. 

3 Peter Spring Rd., Concord, Massachusetts 



LYNCH, CHARLES B. 

1 1 8 Dartmouth St., Rockville Center, New York 



KELLY, JOSEPH F, 
15970lhSt,, Brooklyn, New York 



LAWLER, MARTIN J. 

1 1 Gardner St., Beverly, Massachusetts 



LYNCH, FRANCIS J. 

497 Dwight Rd., Springfield, Massachusetts 



KENNEY, LEO P. 

525 Lowell St., Peabody, Massachusetts 



LAWLESS, JOSEPH F. 

66 Adams St., Maiden, Massachusetts 



LYONS, JOHN M. 

23 Ardmore Ave., Providence, Rhode Island 



KIELY, JOSEPH G. 

4 Stuyvesant Oval, New York, New York 



LAWRENCE, JOHN A. 

1 22 Gates Ave., Montclair, New Jersey 



MacKINNON, PAUL W., JR. 

9 King Rd., Middletown, Rhode Island 



KIENER, MICHAEL A. 

3462 Edison Rd., Cleveland Heights, Ohio 



LAWRENCE, KEITH J. 

301 Patrick Ct., Schenectady, New York 



MADEK, GERALD A. 

6 Dawes Ter., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



KING, JOHN F. 

46 Bonham Rd., Dedham, Massachusetts 



LAWTON, WILLIAM J. 

1 2 Highland St., W. Concord, Massachusetts 



MADIGAN, PATRICK S. 

3800 LeIand St., Chevy Chase, Maryland 



KIRWIN, FRANCIS T. 

1 9 1 6 Avenue A, Scotts Bluff, Nebraska 



LEAHY, WILLIAM P. 

1401 19th St., NW, Canton, Ohio 



MAGNOTTA, ROCCO A. 

5 Hilldale Ave., White Plains, New York 



KITLEY, WILLIAM T. 

87 W. Ouackenbush Ave., Dumont, New Jersey 



LEARY, JOHN C. 

27 Wildwood Ave , Newtonville, Massachusetts 



MAGUIRE, DANIEL 

1 27 Second St., Medford, Massachusetts 



MAGUIRE, MICHAEL B. 

33 Desson Ave., Troy, New York 



Mccarty, michael j. 

4 Beal Rd., Waltham, Massachusetts 



MINIHAN, PATRICK T. 

893 Washington St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



MAHONEY, WALTER J., JR. 
Bellevue Ave., Rye, New York 



McCONVILLE, JAMES F. 

52 Nixon St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



MII\10GUE, RICHARD P. 

175 Sherman Ave., New York, New York 



MAKARA, RONALD G. 

97 Alexander Dr., Bridgeport, Connecticut 

MANNING, ROBERT A. 

53 Marlboro St., Dedham, Massachusetts 

MANNION, MICHAEL J. 

2 Mountainville Ave., Danbury, Connecticut 

MANTEGANI, THOMAS C. 

1 60 Calef Rd., Manchester, New Hampshire 

MARCHITELLI, THOMAS A. 

1 2 1 Temple St., Somerville, Massachusetts 

MARCOU, ROSS A. 

57 Longfellow St., Portland, Maine 

MARIANI, JOSEPH P. 

1 54 Young Ave., Cedar Grove, New Jersey 

MARQUARD, JOHN R. 

286 South St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

MARSHALL, WAYNE P. 

1 2 Devonshire Ct., Middletown, New Jersey 

MARSHALL, WILLIAM P. 

230 Mt. Vernon St., Dedham, Massachusetts 

MARSTON, VINCENT 

1 97 Linwood St., Brockton, Massachusetts 



McDERMOTT, JOSEPH X. 

21 Cedar Circle, Randolph, Massachusetts 

McDonnell, kenneth j. 

1 83 1 Hyde Pard Ave., Readville, Massachusetts 

Mcdonough, michael w. 

1 Magoun Rd., W. Islip, New York 

Mcdonough, robert e. 

1 934 East 1 4th St., Brooklyn, New York 

Mcdowell, kevin p. 

140'35 Cherry Ave., Flushing, New York 

McENEANEY, JAMES E. 

1 6 Wallingford St., Dover, New Hampshire 

McGinn, robert f.,jr. 

34 Forbes St., Riverside, Rhode Island 

McGINNIS, RICHARD C. 

96 School St., Milford, Massachusetts 

McGOVERN, PHILIP C. 

2662 Bainbridge Ave., New York, New York 

McINTIRE, ROBERT J. 

14 Danbury Rd., Mattapan, Massachusetts 

McMAHON, JOSEPH V. 

23 Haslet St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



MOLON, THOMAS J. 

Lake Conway, Vernon, New Jersey 

MONIZ, ROBERT 

770 Plymouth Ave., Fall River, Massachusetts 

MOONEY, FRANCIS A. 

24-1/2 Cottage St., Gr. Barrington, Massachusetts 

MOORE, THOMAS B. 

216 East 50th St., New York, New York 

MORAN, RICHARD G. 

8 Verndale Rd., Milton, Massachusetts 

MORRELL, CLINTON C. 

503 Main St., Madawaska, Maine 

MROCZKOWSKI, STANISLAUS 
243'40 1 44 Ave., Rosedale, New York 

MULHOLLAND, MICHAEL J. 

Harbour Island, Narragansett, Rhode Island 

MULLER, WILLIAM P. 

73 Delle Ave., Roxbury, Massachusetts 

MULREADY, EDWIN 

40 Shawmut St., E. Weymouth, Massachusetts 

MURPHY, JOHN A. 

1 1 8 Bluff Ave., Cranston, Rhode Island 



MARTIN, RICHARD J. 

60 Pierce St., Milton, Massachusetts 

MARTINEZ, ROBERT P. 

620 Rancocas Ave., Riverside, New Jersey 

McARDLE, RICHARD B. 

24 Mamelon Circle, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

McAULIFFE, JOHN J. 

103 Salem St., Haverhill, Massachusetts 

McCABE, PETER J. 

1 3623 Sylvan St., Van Nuys, California 

MCCAFFREY, EDWARD F. 

25205 Bayfair Ct., Bay Village, Ohio 

McCALL, JAMES R. 

18 Edwards St., Roslyn Heights, New York 

McCANN, CHARLES F. 

24 Kipling Rd., Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

McCarthy, richard j. 

544 Andover St., Lawrence, Massachusetts 



McNAMARA, BRIAN W. 

1 9 Wallace St., Rockville Ctr., New York 



McNAMEE, BROTHER H., REV. 

296 Allston St., Brookline, Massachusetts 



MEGLEY, DAVID J. 

32 Wells Ave., Croton-on-Hudson, New York 



MELEEDY, MICHAEL F. 

220 East Squantum St., Ouincy, Massachusetts 



MELLEN, MICHAEL J. 

36 High St., Charlestown, Massachusetts 



MELLYN, JOHN E., JR. 

43 Westwood Circle, Dover, New Hampshire 



MERIGAN, WILLIAM H. 

608 Hancock St., Abington, Massachusetts 



MILLER, DOUGLAS J. 

20723 Beachwood Dr., Rocky River, Ohio 



MILLER, JOHN H., JR. 

24 Blakeville St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



MURPHY, NEIL F. 

1 3 Broadview St., Bristol, Connecticut 



MURPHY, PETER A. 

5 Brower PL, Port Chester, New York 



MURPHY, THUMAS W. 

1 5 Bradford Rd., Schenectady, New York 



MURRAY, PHILIP C. 

3 Alfred Ter., Woburn, Massachusetts 



MURRAY, VINCENT A., JR. 

8 Victoria Rd., Ouincy, Massachusetts 



MURRAY, WILLIAM B. 

7005 Ridge Crest Ter., Brooklyn, New York 



NANNICELLI, JOHN J. 

39 Elder St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



NAPOLI, PAUL K. 

36 Rhode Ave., Nutley, New Jersey 



NEEDHAM, THOMAS M. 

148 Sycamore St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



NICOLETTA, ANDREW F. 

1 7 Farquhar Rd., Mewton, Massachusetts 

NOCERA, MICHAEL J. 

161 Winding Brook Rd., New Rochelle, New York 

NOVAKOWSKI, THEODORE L 

45 North Federal St., Lynn, Massachusetts 

NOWAK, STANLEY P. 

55 Phoenix Ave.. Lowell, Massachusetts 

O'BRIEN, STEPHEN T. 

41 Washington Rd., Rye, New Hampshire 

O'CONNELL, MICHAEL F. 

601 West 179St., New York, New York 

O'FLANAGAN, JOHN P. 

66 Crest St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

O'HARA, DANIEL J. 

205 Stiles St., Elizabeth, New Jersey 

D'KEEFE, TIMOTHY R. 

923 West Sunnyside, Chicago, Illinois 

OKEN, RICHARD L. 

1 203 Wine Spring Lane, Towson, Maryland 

OlEARY, DENIS 

21 Sidley Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

OlEARY, JOHN P. 

8 Electric Ave., Somerville, Massachusetts 



PABST, MICHAEL J. 

7251 Scherrei Dr., Hales Corners, Wisconsin 

PADDEN, EDWARD M. 

24 Dell Ave., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

PAGLIERANI, RONALD J. 

39 Clover Ave., Brockton, Massachusetts 

PALMER, PHILIP J. 

235 Forest St., Medford, Massachusetts 

PARCELS, BURTIS G. 

2 Maple PL, Keyport, New Jersey 

PARRILLO, CARL G. 

442 Wolcott St., Waterbury, Connecticut 

PATTI, JOHN A. 

9 De Young Rd., Glen Rock, New Jersey 

PECCINI, ROBERT T. 

302 Chancery St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 

PECKHAM, RAYMOND L. 

10 Petrell Park, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

PENELLA, ROBERT J. 

49 Holyoke St., Ouincy, Massachusetts 

PENNING, JOSEPH S. 

259 Vine St , Everett, Massachusetts 

PERRAS, RICHARD A. 

1 05 East Clinton St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 



PUCCI, WILLIAM P. 

55 Fenno St., Wollaston, Massachusetts 

QUARATIELLO, FRANCIS C. 

29 Bradwood St., Boston, Massachusetts 

RAMPOLLA, MICHAEL A. 
24'07 36 St., Astoria, New York 

RANDALL, ARTHUR III 

1 5 1 Weeburn Dr., New Canaan, Connecticut 

RAYMOND, RICHARD N. 

92 New York Ave., S. Portland, Maine 

REGAN, CLIFTON JAMES 

1 1 5 Asbby State Rd., Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

REGAN, JAMES D. Ill 

225 Vermont St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

REGISTER, DAVID F. 

USN Amm. Depot Otrs. A, Red Bank, New Jersey 

REILLY. CHARLES J. 

3 Brownson Ter., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

REILLY, THOMAS E. 

1 1 7 Loring Rd., Winthrop, Massachusetts 

REILLY, THOMAS H. 

28 Wescott St., Riverside, Connecticut 

REINHARD, RICHARD W. 

257 Cabot St., Newtonville, Massachusetts 



OlEARY. JOSEPH E. 

37 Washburn Ave., Wellesley, Massachusetts 

OlEARY, THOMAS J. 

89 Peach St., Walpole, Massachusetts 

OlOUGHLIN, JOHN E. 

1 94 Claflin St., Belmont, Massachusetts 

O'MALLEY, TERENCE P. 

1047 Walnut St., Newton, Massachusetts 

O'NEILL, BRIAN R. 

1 80 Laurel Dr., Needham, Massachusetts 

O'NEILL, MICHAEL R. 

1 29 Fay Rd., N. Syracuse, New York 

O'REILLY, THOMAS P. 

23 Wellesley Park, Dorchester, Massachusetts 

ORMOND, THOMAS M.,JR. 

104 Proctor Ave., Revere, Massachusetts 

O'ROURKE, JOHN M. 

1 60 Eliot St., Ashland, Massachusetts 



PESAPANE, DAVID A. 

81 Center St., W. Haven, Connecticut 

PHELAN, ANDREW P. 

1 583 East 1 G St., Brooklyn, New York 

PITTA, DENNIS A. 

44 Maple St., Belmont, Massachusetts 

PJURA, GEORGE A., JR. 

63 Hickory St., Bridgeport, Connecticut 

PONERA, CHARLES J. 

P. 0. Box 555, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanganyika 

POOPOR, MARK J. 

96 Carson Ave., Dalton, Massachusetts 

PORCARO, ANIELLO 

226 Palfrey St., Watertown, Massachusetts 

POWER, STEPHEN C. 

20 Valley Rd., Woburn, Massachusetts 

POWER, THOMAS E. 

1 34 Prince St., Needham, Massachusetts 



RENDA, VINCENT J. 

9 Tally Ho Lane, Framingham, Massachusetts 

RICCI, JOSEPH D. 

44 Thornton St., Lawrence, Massachusetts 

RICCIO, ALBERT H. 

1 1 69 Highland Pk. Rd., Schenectady, New York 

RIEHL, EDWARD J. 

1 2 Terrace Park, Garden City, New York 

RING, WENDELL C. 

130 High St., Hampton, New Hampshire 

ROGALSKI, RICHARD A. 

6 First St., Saugus, Massachusetts 

ROSS, RAYMOND F. 

1 38 Mishawum Rd., Woburn, Massachusetts 

RYAN, DENNIS M. 

1 10 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Gloucester, Massachusetts 

RYAN, JOHN J. 

88 Cary Ave., Milton, Massachusetts 



OSENTON, WILLIAM D. 

1 7 Glover Rd., Needham, Massachusetts 



PRUNIER, GARY G. 

2 Btookfield Rd , Methuen, Massachusetts 



SACCO, JOHN M 

82 Leyden St., E. Boston, Massachusetts 



SALIMBENE, FRANKLYN P. 

64 Sigourney Rd., Revere, Massachusetts 

SANDBERG, WILLIAM C. 

67 Beach St., Revere, Massachusetts 

SANNELLA, NICHOLAS 

94 Hancock St., Lexington, Massachusetts 



SOUZA, PAUL J. 

129 Adams St., Fairhaven, Massachusetts 

SPADA, SALVATORE 

2 1 Dorchester St., Quincy, Massachusetts 

STEINKRAUSS, PHILIP J. 

1 6 Dustin St., Brighton, Massachusetts 



THOMPSON, BRUCE J. 

131 Quincy St., Brockton, Massachusetts 



TIERI, DOMINIC N. 

224A Lake St., Brighton, Massachusetts 



TOBIASZ, ROBERT B. 

25 Linebrook Rd., Ipswich, Massachusetts 



SANTOSUOSSO, DAVID V. 

624 Poplar St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



STEIR, MICHAEL L. 

622 Morton St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



TREACY, MICHAEL F. 

722 Washington St., Dedham, Massachusetts 



SARNO, RAYMOND L 

8 Oriole Rd., Yonkers, New York 



STEWART, CHARLES A. 
3318WoodleyRd., Toledo, Ohio 



TRIBBLE, JOHN A. 

R.F.D. 1 , Box 233, Jaffrey, New Hampshire 



SAULNIERS, ALFRED H. 

41 Jean St., Acushnet, Massachusetts 



ST. GEORGE, JOHN H. 

45 Sunset Ave., Amityville, New York 



TUCKER, KENNETH D. 

26910 Eastwood Lane, Olmsted Falls, Ohio 



SBARRA, ROBERT D. 

76 Brookside PL, New Rochelle, New York 



STRAW, LAWRENCE J. 

3623 Ballina Can. Rd., Encino, California 



TULEY, R. DAVID 

1 670 Woodview Lane, Hamilton, Ohio 



SCANLON, LOUIS JAMES, JR. 

25 Sheridan St., Lawrence, Massachusetts 



STRONACH, THEODORE H. 

1 07 Concord St., Holliston, Massachusetts 



VANLEER, PAUL W. 

Box 48 1 , Woodstock, New York 



SCELSO, SALVATORE P. 

207 Fellsway West, Medford, Massachusetts 



SULLIVAN, DANIEL F. 

2 St. Clare Rd., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



VERDU, PEDRO 

23 Bay St., New Britain, Connecticut 



SCHAEFER, CARL F. 

1 1 Eimwood Rd., Westport, Connecticut 



SULLIVAN, DANIEL R. 

612 Howe St., Manchester, New Hampshire 



VIAVATTENE, RONALD L. 

9 Park Meadown Dr., Pittsford, New York 



SCHNEIDERHAN, PAUL A. 

7 1 Belmont St., Weymouth, Massachusetts 



SULLIVAN, DAVID J. 

108 High Service Ave., N. Providence, Rhode Island 



VIOLANTE, MICHAEL 

725 Seymour Ave., Niagara Falls, New York 



SCHUMACHER, GERALD J. 

246 Eimwood Ave., Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey 



SULLIVAN, DAVID R. 

56 Riverview St., Springfield, Massachusetts 



VIZVARY, GEORGE L 

P. 0. Box 486, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 



SCOTTON, EDWARD G. 

41 Boulevard Rd., Dedham, Massachusetts 



SULLIVAN, DONALD L 

1 25 Pond St., S. Weymouth, Massachusetts 



WALDRON. WILLIAM H., JR. 

170 Oakley Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 



SEROW, WILLIAM J. 

2046 Schenectady Ave., Brooklyn, New York 



SULLIVAN, EDWARD J. 

63 Thornton Park, Winthrop, Massachusetts 



WALKER, THOMAS M. 

1 59 'B Fort Lee Rd., Leonia, New Jersey 



SHALGIAN, ROBERT E. 

203 North Ave., Rockland, Massachusetts 



SHAUGHNESSY, EDWARD G. 

726 Washington St., Dedham, Massachusetts 



SULLIVAN, ROBERT J. 

8 1 Ridgeway Ave., Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

SULLIVAN, SAMUEL H. 

26 Carruth St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



WALSH, JAMES M. 

41 Perham St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



WALSH, ROBERT E. 

405 North Ave., Weston, Massachusetts 



SHEVLIN, TIMOTHY J. 

7 Rosemary Rd., Dedham, Massachusetts 



SUTHERLAND, CHARLES J. 

1 1 23 Brandon Rd., Cleveland Heights, Ohio 



WALSH, THOMAS A. 

1243 California Rd., Eastchester, New York 



SILVEY, JOSEPH F. 

1 5 Winter St., Maiden, Massachusetts 



SWYMER, GEORGE S. 

101 Alexander Ave., Belmont, Massachusetts 



WATKINS, ALLEN C. 

27 Jeanette Ave., Belmont, Massachusetts 



SIMON, JOHN J. 

441 16thSt., Brooklyn, New York 



SKOBLAR, RICHARD S. 

369 Broad St., Fairview, New Jersey 



SMILEY, LEONARD M. 

159'03 28th Ave., Flushing, New York 



SMITH, DAVID S. 

34 Chesbrough Rd., Boston, Massachusetts 



SZPAKOWSKI, MARK M. 

54 Park Ave., Natick, Massachusetts 

THERRIAULT, GENE D. 

265 Walton St., Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

THIBODEAU, PHILIPPE A. 

80 Highland Ave., Wollaston, Massachusetts 

THOMAS, ROBERT J. 

1 7 Pershing Ave., Ossining, New York 



WESTPHAL, RICHARD F. 

585 Bergen Ave., Jersey City, New Jersey 



WHITE, JEFFREY A. 

68 Foster St., Arlington, Massachusetts 



WHITE, THOMAS J. 

85 Chesbrough Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



WHITE, WILLIAM P. 

47 Rosemont St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



WILLIAMS, TIMOTHY J. 

49 Brooks St., Springfield, Massachusetts 

WOLTERS. WILLIAM F. 

588 Onderdonk Ave., Brooklyn, New York 

WOOD, JOSEPH T. 

229 Whaley St., Freeport, New York 

WORTHEIM, BRUCE D. 

26 Thayer Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 

YUTZY, JAN C. 

56 Danbury Circle So., Rochester, New York 

ZAIKOWSKl, CHARLES J. 

86 Florence St., Providence, Rhode Island 



BUDWITIS, CLAIRE J. 

34 Tierney St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

BUTT, LYNDA L 

76 Mayo Rd., Wellesley, Massachusetts 

CARLYON, THOMAS J. 

846 Locust St., Hazleton, Pennsylvania 

CATALANO, NANCY A. 

144 Sixth Ave., Long Branch, New Jersey 

CAVALLARG, JOANNE M. 

1 53 Grove Ave., Wilmington, Massachusetts 

CAVANAUGH, JAMES E. 

1 7 Flint St., Somerville, Massachusetts 



CURRAN, CORNELIA L 

41 Old English Rd., Worcester, Massachusetts 

CURRAN, RICHARD J. 

141 1 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

DACKO, MARIANNE 

141 Alvin Ave., Milton, Massachusetts 

DAILEY, CAROL A. 

55 Bright Rd , Belmont, Massachusetts 

DANIELE, JENNIE R. 

1036 Glen Rd., Palisade, New Jersey 

D'ANTONIG. LOUISE A. 

1 2 Yale St., Medford, Massachusetts 



ZAINO, WILLIAM J, 

1212 Sleepy Hollow L, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 



CHADWICK, ARTHUR C. 

40 Westchester Drive, Attleboro, Massachusetts 



DERBA, JEANNE M. 

65 Damon Rd., Medfotd, Massachusetts 



ZIDE, BARRY M 

70 Clyde St., Newtonville, Massachusetts 



CHAMBERLAIN, PETER S. 

1 062 Barnes Rd., Wallingford, Connecticut 



DEVLIN, CELIA C. 

25 Miami Terrace, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



ZIDE, MICHAEL F. 

70 Clyde St., Newtonville, Massachusetts 

ZIMMERMAN, ROBERT G. 

4 Gregory Ct., Barrington, Rhode Island 



school of education 

ABBOTT, ANN L. 

6 Brook Farm Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

AHERN, DAVID J. 

43 Gardena St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

ARTHURS, PATRICIA A. 

382 Broadway, Somerville, Massachusetts 

ATKINSON, DIANE 

399 Rantoul St., Beverly, Massachusetts 

BEATON, JAMES F. 

81 Gardiner St., W. Lynn, Massachusetts 

BECK, GERALDINE C. 

1 93 Manthorne Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

BLACKWOOD, MARY K. 

27 Wentworth Rd., Melrose, Massachusetts 

BLUMER, MICHAEL 

1 94 Congress Ave., Chelsea, Massachusetts 

BOTTO, CARMINE N. 

9 Jackson Ave., Everett, Massachusetts 

BROKOWSKI, WILLIAM W. 

343 New London Turnpike. Norwich, Connecticut 

BRUNELLE. WILLIAM J. 

146 Chiswick Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 



CLAFLIN, KAREN 

82 Moss Hill Rd., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

COLAMARIA, CAROL A. 

8 Woodland Rd., Norwood, Massachusetts 

COLLINS, ELLEN C. 

1 Gray St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

COLLINS, JOHN J. 

84 Tonawanda St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

COLLINS, NANCY M. 

68 Hutchinson Rd., Winchester, Massachusetts 

CONNARTON, JOHN B., JR. 

1 7 1 Park St., Medford, Massachusetts 

CONNOLLY, DENNIS F. 

1 2 Grant St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

CONNOLLY, FRANCES P. 

54 Gushing Rd., Maiden, Massachusetts 

CORMIER, LINDA A. 

5 Mill St., Beverly, Massachusetts 

COUGHLIN, CARROLL J. 

1239 Mitchell Ave., Tallahassee, Florida 

CRAIGEN, PATRICIA A. 

51 Veterans Memorial Drive, Peabody, Mass. 

CREEDEN, ANNE L 

42 Underwood Park, Waltham, Massachusetts 

CROOK, MARGARET A, 

8 Canterbury Drive, Norwood, Massachusetts 

CUNNIFF, MARGARET A. 

13 Sherman St., Natick, Massachusetts 



DIGREZIO, NANCY T. 

27 Powder House Rd , Medford, Massachusetts 

DILLON, THOMAS A 

1 98 Windsor Ave., Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

DINATALE, JULIE ANN 

1 29 Main St., Maiden, Massachusetts 

DIVVER, DENISE J. 

40 Westchester Drive, Westwood, Massachusetts 

DOHERTY, ANNE K. 

1 1 Locke St., Andover, Massachusetts 

DONOHOE, BRIAN P. 

1 08 Greaton Rd., West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

DONOVAN, SUSAN M. 

48 Evans St., Medford, Massachusetts 

DOWNES, JOHN F. 

8 Theriault Court, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

DUFFY, PAULA K. 

878 Highland Ave., Fall River, Massachusetts 

DUGAN, DONNA E. 

32-20 1 68th St., Flushing, New York 

DUNN, RICHARD J 

93 Willowdean Ave., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

DWYER, WILLIAM F. 

1 686 Metropolitan Ave., Bronx 62, New York 

EDMONDS, PAULA J. 

1 56 Hampshire St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 

ELLIOTT, RICHARD J. 

14 Christine Terr., S. Weymouth, Massachusetts 



ERCOLINO, KATHLEEN 

75 Deal Lake Point Rd., Wanamassa, New Jersey 



GILMORE, WILLIAM M. 

30 Piermont St., Watertown, Massachusetts 



JOHNEN, PETRA G. 

940 Brinsmade Ave., Bronx, New York 



ERICKSON, DENISE M. 

16 Vernon St., Newburyport, Massachusetts 



FALLA, MARY J. 

619 Main St., Harwich Port, Massachusetts 



G0ET2, ELIZABETH G. 

61 Pomona Ave., Fair Lawn, New Jersey 



GRENNAN, JOANN MARIE 

12 Middle Drive, Plandome, New York 



JORDAN, DONNA A. 

49 Standish Circle, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

JORDAN, RAE E. 

72 Charles St., Mansfield, Massachusetts 



FEELEY, ELLEN F. 

1 56 Grove St., W. Medf ord, Massachusetts 



GUENETTE, ELAINE A. 

26 Jackson St., Salem, Massachusetts 



JOYCE, MONICA K. 

62 Sheldon St.. Milton, Massachusetts 



FERACD, PATRICIA A. 

75 Stonehedge Drive, S. Greenwich, Connecticut 



GUERRIERO, BARBARA J. 

59 George St., Medford, Massachusetts 



KADLICK, JUDITH F. 

14 Birch Rd., Natick, Massachusetts 



FIBKINS, BONNIE G. 

297 Fern St., W. Hartford, Connecticut 



FINNEGAN, ELAINE A. 

90 Turner Rd., Scituate, Massachusetts 



HALPIN, MARY M. 

26 Linden St., Reading, Massachusetts 



HANNA, PATRICIA-LOUISE 

175 Landing Rd. North, Rochester, New York 



KARD, DIANE F. 

90 Schneider Lane, Hauppauge, New York 

KEANEY, ELIZABETH T. 

581 East 8th St., S. Boston, Massachusetts 



FIORE, ANGELA 

9 Churchill Rd., Winchester, Massachusetts 



FIORE, ELIZABETH V. 

14 Bailey Rd., Somerville, Massachusetts 



FITZGERALD, PAMELA J. 

1 1 Royce Rd., Newton Centre, Massachusetts 



HANNABURY, RALPH A. 

1 29 Porter St., Melrose, Massachusetts 



HARMON, ROSEMARY 

1 24 Clinton Park, Tonowanda, New York 



HARRINGTON, KATHLEEN T. 

9 Loumac Rd., Wilmington, Massachusetts 



KEARNEY, MARY E. 

26 Winter St., Arlington, Massachusetts 

KEARNS, EILEEN M. 

1 59 Highland Ave., Arlington, Massachusetts 

KEAVENEY, MADELINE M. 

76 Oakdale Ave., Dedham, Massachusetts 



FLYNN, PATRICIA A. 

967 Summer St., Lynnfield, Massachusetts 



HARRINGTON, MARY E. 

708 Seaman Ave., Beachwood, New Jersey 



KELLEHER, JOHN D. 

67 Willis St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 



FOLEY, CAROL L 

297 Fuller St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



HARVEY, JOSEPH D. 

58 Somerset Ave., Winthrop, Massachusetts 



KELLER, MARLENE A. 

125 Franklin St., Newton, Massachusetts 



FORINA, JOSEPH A. 

106 Bremen St., E. Boston, Massachusetts 



HENRY, WILLIAM J. 

250 Shore Drive, Winthrop, Massachusetts 



KELLEY, SUSAN MARIE 

30 Deerfield Rd., Needham, Massachusetts 



FOSTER, JOAN E. 

1 2 Stanley Rd., Waltham, Massachusetts 



HINES, ROBERT J. 

4 Ware St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



KELLY, JAMES F. 

18 Allendale Ave., Billerica, Massachusetts 



FOWLER, DAVID S. 

4 Woodage Circle, Braintree, Massachusetts 



HINRICHS, DONNA K. 

247 Longview Rd., Union, New Jersey 



KOTTMYER, DIANE M. 

8 Grafton St., Lawrence, Massachusetts 



FOWLER, LINDA D. 

1 5 Pleasant St., Medford, Massachusetts 



HOCKMAN, RICHARD C. 

57 Reservoir St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 



KREMMELL, ANN MARIE 

1 1 1 Pacella Drive, Dedham, Massachusetts 



FRIGON, DENISE 

68 East Clay St., Waterbury, Connecticut 



HOGAN, KENNETH W. 

25 Puritan Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 



KRUEGER, CAROL A. 

51 Stevens Ave., W. Long Branch, New Jersey 



FRONC, CAROL ANN 

40 Prospect Ave., Lynnfield, Massachusetts 



HOWARD, JOHN F, JR. 

50 Codman Hill Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



KUPKA, ROBERT J. 

97 Brewster St., Springfield, Massachusetts 



FUSONI, MARY T. 

16 Sheldon St., Milton, Massachusetts 



HUGHES, ELIZABETH F. 

41 6 Mt. Vernon St., Dedham, Massachusetts 



LAKUSTA. PATRICIA C. 

RD. 2, Box 474, Ramsey Rd., Lebanon, New Jersey 



GAUTHIER, MARLENE 

203 West Hooper St., N. Tiverton, Rhode Island 



JACQUETTE, ARLENE R. 

6 Sagamore Rd., Stamford, Connecticut 



LAVENDER, JAMES S. 

2 1 2 High St., Medford, Massachusetts 



GERVAIS, DONALD J. 

86 West Chapel St., Abington, Massachusetts 



JANSON, GAIL A. 

Box 528, Seroe Colo, Aruba Island, Neth. Antilles 



LEVERGOOD, PATRICIA A. 

8 St. Mary's Lane, Salem, New Hampshire 



GILBERT, JOSEPH L 

1 Anthony St., Jewett City, Connecticut 



JEWETT, JANE A. 

28 King St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



LIDDELL, MARY JANE 

1 6 Eleanor St., Dedham, Massachusetts 



LOGAN, MARIE C. 

1 1 4 Taylor St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

LORDEN, JUDITH E. 

Tarbell St., E. Pepperell, Massachusetts 

LOWE, STEPHEN J. 

29 Lockland Ave., Framingham, Massachusetts 

LUND, MYLES J. 

33 Hathaway Ave.. Beverly, Massachusetts 

LYNCH, KATHRYN L 

298 Indian Trail, Mountainside, New Jersey 

MacDONALD, DONALD J., JR. 

270 Main St., Watertown, Massachusetts 

MAGUIRE, BARBARA A. 

78 St. Gregory's St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

MANDEVILLE, PAUL J. 

143 Druid Hill Ave., Randolph, Massachusetts 

MANSFIELD, DIANE M. 

90 Richardson Rd., Lynn, Massachusetts 

MASCI, CAROLANN 

Cross Rd., Nabnasset, Massachusetts 

MAWN, BARRY W. 

68 Arlington Rd., VVoburn, Massachusetts 

McAULIFFE, JEANNE E. 

70 Nichols St., Norwood, Massachusetts 



MITTON, FRANK W. 

53 Mt. Washington St.. Everett, Massachusetts 

MORENCY, MARILYN E. 

55 Laurel St , Fairhaven. Massachusetts 

MORGAN, JANE L. 

28 Goldsmith St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

MORGAN, MARGERY F. 

1 1 5 Child St., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

MORTARELLI, ETTORE A. 

1 1 7 Bedford St., W. Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

MUCCI, SALVATORE V, 

76 Delano Ave., Revere, Massachusetts 

MUCINSKAS, LUCY C. 

447 East Seventh St., S Boston, Massachusetts 

MURRAY, JANICE M. 

17 Whitten St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

MUSUMECI, JOAN M. 

10 Boylston St., Methuen, Massachusetts 

NAHM, SR. LAURIANNA 

62 Newton St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

NEYLON, MARY ELLEN 

1 1 Barnard Ave., Watertown, Massachusetts 

NOVELLINE. ANTOINETTE M. 

3 Burget Ave., Medford, Massachusetts 



POWER, FIONA A. 

1 5-E Honeycutt Rd., Fort Bragg, North Carolina 

PRUYN, WILLIAM J. 

458 Dover Rd., Westwood, Massachusetts 

REID, LANA F. 

1 7 Stratford Rd., Natick, Massachusetts 

RENZULLO, ROSEMARIE A. 

276 Hanover St., Boston, Massachusetts 

RIETCHEL, CAROL L 

52 Warwick Rd., W. Newton, Massachusetts 

ROGERS, JANET M. 

970 South St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

RUSIECKI, ELIZABETH M. 

1 1 Front St., Three Rivers, Massachusetts 

RYAN, JUDITH A. 

35 Asticou Rd., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

SANTOLUCITO, SANDRA M. 

14 Gale St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

SCHAIT, MARTHA L 

181 Cooper Ave., Upper Montclair, New Jersey 

SCHAUB, NOEL A. 

40 Trainor Drive., Braintree, Massachusetts 

SIGNES, CARMEN A. 

299 East 3 1 st St., Paterson, New Jersey 



McCABE, GEORGE F. 

2 Hill St.. Charlestown, Massachusetts 

McCarthy, dermod t. 

1 1 5 Channing Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 

McCUE, PATRICIA A. 

31 Columbia St., Wilmington, Massachusetts 

McDAVITT, MARY M. 

1 Ainsley St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Mcdonough, mary c. 

198 Metropolitan Ave., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

McGRATH, MARY ELLEN 

14 Perkins Rd., Winchester, Massachusetts 



O'BRIEN, CHERYL E. 

91 Myrtle Ave., Millburn, New Jersey 

O'CONNOR, KATHLEEN A. 

249 Payson Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 

O'MALLEY, KEVIN J. 

61 Whitten St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

ONDRECHEN, THEODORA G. 

1 4 Margaret Rd., Stoneham, Massachusetts 

PARRELLA, VINCENT J. 

163 Waverley Ave., Watertown, Massachusetts 

PENERGAST, ANN MARIE 

176 Porter St., Manchester, Connecticut 



SLAUTA, NANCY F. 

5 Elwin Rd., Natick, Massachusetts 

SMITH, MARY T. 

6 Beachway, Pt. Washington, New York 

SPINKS, KAREN ANN 

22 Park Lane, E. Walpole, Massachusetts 

STRATFORD, CATHERINE V 

22 Suffolk Rd., Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

STRAUCHON, REGINA R. 

1 9 Warren Place, Montclair, New Jersey 

SULLIVAN, JANE M. 

42 Norway Rd., Milton, Massachusetts 



McGUIRE, ANN M. 

19 Linden Ave., Scituate, Massachusetts 



POOD, PATRICIA A. 

920 Boulevard St., Westfield, New Jersey 



SULLIVAN, LAWRENCE J. 

726 Chestnut St., Waban, Massachusetts 



McLOUGHLIN, MAUREEN A. 

348 S. Third St., Oradell, New Jersey 

McNAMARA, ANN L 

433 Adams St., Milton, Massachusetts 



POLMON, SANDRA L 

1 26 Southwest Rd., Waterbury, Connecticut 

PGRTANOVA, DONALD F. 

65 Evergreen Ave., Somerville, Massachusetts 



SUPPLE, JEANNE A. 

50 Audrey Ave., Needham, Massachusetts 

TAWCZYNSKI, DANIEL P. 

137 Division St., Great Barrington, Massachusetts 



MESSINA, FRANCES ALEX 

1 424 Center St., Newton Centre, Massachusetts 



PORTER, SUSAN A 

132 Gulliver St., Milton, Massachusetts 



TOOMEY, FRANCIS M. 

51 Montrose St., Somerville, Massachusetts 



TROTTA, NOREEIM A. 

1 1 Richmond Aue., Milford, Massachusetts 



BALE, WILLIAM M. 

957 West Second St., Elmlra, New York 



BROWN, DAVID G. 

1 65 Long St., Warwick, Rhode Island 



TUOHEY. BRIAN J. 

480 Crafts St., West Newton, Massachusetts 



BARBIERI, WILLIAM G. 

19 Riverdale Rd., Milford, Connecticut 



BROWN, THOMAS J. 

14 Downing Rd., Peabody, Massachusetts 



TUSZYNSKI, NANCY A. 

3939 Emerson St., Evanston, Illinois 



BARNES, PAUL J. 

290 Renfrew St., Arlington, Massachusetts 



BURGOYNE, JOHN E. JR. 

1 Buttonwood Lane, Lancaster, Massachusetts 



VINCENT, FRANCIS J. 

73 Tarkiln Hill Rd., New Bedford, Massachusetts 



BARRY, JOHN J. 

90 Orchard St., E. Hartford, Connecticut 



BURNS, RICHARD F. 

249 Mystic Valley Pkwy., Winchester, Mass. 



WARD, BARBARA J. 

1 2 Pershing Rd., W. Newton, Massachusetts 

WEISENBERGER, JUDITH C. 

249 Manchester St., Mattapan, Massachusetts 



BATES, WILLIAM E. 

26 Mt. Pleasant St., Winchester, Massachusetts 



BEHAN, DENNIS E. 

138 Common St., W. Ouincy, Massachusetts 



BUTLER, WILLIAM J. Ill 

51 Longview Rd., Port Washington, New York 

BUTTERS, ALAN L 

75 Landseer St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



WELCH, KATHLEEN M. 

9 Sunnyside Rd., Lynn, Massachusetts 



BENE, EDWARD J. 

40 Evergreen St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



CAHALY, RONALD F. 

58 Adamson St., Allston, Massachusetts 



WHITE, ELAINE M. 

8 Davidson Rd., Wakefield, Massachusetts 



BENEDICT, CHARLES A. 

141 2 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 



CAKE, BENJAMIN J. 

1425 Hunter Rd., Rydal, Pennsylvania 



WHITE, WILLIAM C. 

2 Highland Park, Cambridge, Massachusetts 



BENT, ROBERT M. 

28 Suffolk Rd., Wellesley, Massachusetts 



CALF, JOHN R. 

21 Lake Ave., Walpole, Massachusetts 



WILDE, ROBERT T. 

40 Corbett St., Andover, Massachusetts 



BERGAGNA, RICHARD P. 

72 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 



CALLANAN, JAMES E. Ill 

651 Watertown St., Newtonville, Massachusetts 



WILLIAMS, CHARLES T. 

324 Savin Hill Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



BIGHAM, BRADFORD 

97 Bacon St., Waltham, Massachusetts 



CAMARRA, PETER A. 

10 Sanford Rd., Canton, Massachusetts 



ZAMMARCHI, FRANK A., JR. 

1 9 Ridge St., Winchester, Massachusetts 



BLAIR, JOHN H. 

29 Barbour Rd., New Britain, Connecticut 



CANTY, EUGENE J. 

49 Putnam Rd., Somerville, Massachusetts 



business administration 



BODIO. ROBERT F. 

58 Mt. Pleasant St., Milford, Massachusetts 



CANTY, WILLIAM P., Jr. 

44 Walnut St., Everett, Massachusetts 



AIELLO, RICHARD J. 

1 10 Highland Rd., Somerville, Massachusetts 



BOND, ARTHUR M. JR. 

394 Franklin St.. Wrentham, Massachusetts 



CAPOBIANCO, DAVID C. 

1066 Hyde Park Ave., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 



ALLEN, ROBERT M. 

1 5 Brierwood Rd., Braintree, Massachusetts 



BORDUAS, ARTHUR J. 

23 Rockland Ave., Portland, Maine 



CAPOBIANCO, RAYMOND J. 

1066 Hyde Park Ave., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 



AMANN, Peter T. 

Cayuga Lane, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 



BOULAIS, PETER D. 

45 Reynolds St., Danielson, Connecticut 



CAPRARO, ANTHONY J. 

14-1/2 HullSt., Boston, Massachusetts 



AMICK, ELLIOTT W., JR. 

5 Tart Place, Cornwall Hudson, New York 



BOVE, JOHN A. 

25 Marshall Ave., Scituate, Massachusetts 



CARALUZZI, ANTHONY E., JR. 
Giles Hill Rd., Redding, Connecticut 



ANTONIO, MARSHALL 

46A Margo Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 



BOYLE, JOHN J. 

4 French St., Danbury, Connecticut 



CARNEY, OWEN J. 

1 9 Canterbury Rd., Winchester, Massachusetts 



AUSTIN, BRIAN M. 

1 53 Whitehall Rd., Albany, New York 



BRADLEY, RICHARD J. JR. 

60 Main St., Westford, Massachusetts 



CARROLL, DAVID M. 

25 Upland Rd., Corning, New York 



AVALLONE, VINCENT A. 

430 Lighthouse Rd., New Haven, Connecticut 



BRANSFIELD, STEPHEN B. 

49 Pleasant St., S. Natick, Massachusetts 



CASEY, JOHN P. 

75 Alpine St., Arlington, Massachusetts 



BAICHI, JOHN F. 

41 4 North Orchard Rd., Solvay, New Vork 



BRAZILIAN, JOHN H. 

41 Glades Rd., Scituate, Massachusetts 



CASHIN, EDWARD L 

481 Upham St., Melrose, Massachusetts 



BAKER, GERARD A. 

44 Home Park Rd., Braintree, Massachusetts 



BRIDE. PETER F. 

50 Poinsettia St., Middletown, Connecticut 



CHABOT, PAUL E. 

61 SeventhSt, Auburn, Maine 



ClOCl, RAYMOND J. 

61 Forbes St., Providence, Rhode Island 



CURRY, ANDREW P. 

461 Washington St., Brighton, IVlassachusetts 



DOWi\IEY, JOHN J. 

1 96 Fuller St., Dorchester, IVlassachusetts 



CLIFFORD, WILLIAM R. 

5 Dunbray Rd., Springfield Massachusetts 



CUSKIE, THOMAS J. 

43 Windsor Place, Brooklyn, New York 



DOYLE, RICHARD J 

1 2 Beechcroft Rd., Newton, Massachusetts 



COLETTA, JOHN N. 

304 Marrett Rd., Lexington, Massachusetts 



DAILEY, JOHN JOSEPH 

6 Washington St., Milton, Massachusetts 



DRISCOLL, PAUL F. 

64 Brattle St., Arlington, Massachusetts 



COLLINS, JOSEPH R. 

1 1 Leiland Rd., Stoughton, Massachusetts 



DALEY, MARTIN R. 

1 7 Elliot Ter., Newton, Massachusetts 



DUGGAN, MICHAEL J. 

40 Waldo Rd., Arlington, Massachusetts 



COLLINS, RICHARD J. 

64 Holmes St., Marion, Massachusetts 



DALKIEWICZ, NORBERT W. 

21 Q W. Seneca St., Vernon, New York 



DUKE. WILLIAM H. 

4323 Braddock Rd., Alexandria, Virginia 



COLLINS, WILLIAM H. 

1 1 7 Franklin St., Brookline, Massachusetts 



DAMICO, JOHN A. 

1 04 Forrest Ave., Fair Haven, New Jersey 



DUNN, ROBERT G., JR. 

6 Fernway St., Winchester, Massachusetts 



CONCANNON, WILLIAM J. 

279 Linwood Ave., Newtonville, Massachusetts 



DARR, STEPHEN B. 

348 Adams St., Milton, IVlassachusetts 



DUNN, WILLIAM D. 

6 Grovenor Rd., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



CONNERY, JOHN W. 

10 Briarfield Rd., Barrington, Rhode Island 



DEBERNARDIS, WILLIAM J, 
8878 1 6th Ave., Brooklyn, New York 



DURKIN, ARTHUR E.,Jr. 

5 Felicia Rd., Melrose, Massachusetts 



CONNOLLY, JOHN D. 

1 9 Rockledge Dr., W. Hartford, Connecticut 



DECOLLIBUS, JOHN J. 

23 Hodder Lane, Framingham, Massachusetts 



DWYER, S. JOHN 

599 Country Way, N. Scituate, Massachusetts 



CONNOLLY, WILLIAM R. 

58 Avalon Rd., Milton, Massachusetts 



DEFRONZO, RICHARD 

1 2 Intervale Ave., Saugus, Massachusetts 



DWYER, TERRENCE K. 

43 Courtenay Circle, Pittsford, New York 



CONNORS, HARRY E., JR. 

608 Delafreld Rd., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



DELANEY, GEORGE F. 

55 Lyndhurst St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



DWYER, THOMAS E. 

107 Tudor Rd., Needham, Massachusetts 



CONNORS, THOMAS F. 

61 Nehoiden St., Needham, Massachusetts 



DELANEY, LEON J. 

221 Cambridge Rd., Woburn, Massachusetts 



EISENHART, FRANK J. 

1805 Hillcrest Rd., Laverock, Pennsylvania 



CONWAY, Richard F. 

650 Concord Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 



DEMAMBRO, JOSEPH A. 

326 Hammond St., Newton, Massachusetts 



ERICKSON, LLOYD F. 

73 Marianna St., Lynn, Massachusetts 



COOK, PAUL W. 

8 Karlton Circle, Andover, Massachusetts 



DIMASI, SALVATORE F. 

181 Salem St., Boston, Massachusetts 



FAHERTY, FREDERICK C. 

27 Ledge Rd., Wayne, New Jersey 



COSTELLO, BRIAN 

446 Dover Rd., Westwood, Massachusetts 



DINEEN, FRANCIS J. 

19 Lewis St., Somerville, Massachusetts 



FANTASIA, PAUL H. 

1 88 Edenfield Ave., Watertown, Mass. 



COSTELLO, JOHN H. 

305 Andover St., Lowell, Massachusetts 



DOHERTY, LEONARD J. 

575 Canton Ave., Milton, Massachusetts 



FITZGERALD, JOHN H. Ill 

715 Broadway, Chelsea, Massachusetts 



COURNOYER, ALFRED C. 

28 Longfellow Dr., Holyoke, Massachusetts 



DOHERTY, PETER S. 

49 Union St., Watertown, Massachusetts 



FITZGERALD, JOHN J. 

30-1/2 Mellen St., Wakefield, Massachusetts 



CRADOCK, JOHN P. 

1 Roseway, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



DOHERTY, ROBERT K. 

345 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



FITZGIBBONS, JOHN F 

1 6 Lawrence St., Wakefield, Massachusetts 



CROKE, ROGER L 

27 Thornley St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



DOLAN, JOHN F. 

1 5 Linden St., Salem, Massachusetts 



FITZPATRICK, JAMES P. 

9 Tyler St , Maiden, Massachusetts 



CUMMINS, RICHARD A. 

183 Boylston St., Brockton, Massachusetts 



DOLAN, NEIL M. 

17 Bow Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 



FITZPATRICK, JOHN R. 

82 Congress St., Milford, Massachusetts 



CUNNINGHAM, ROBERT J. 

214 Central St., Danvers, Massachusetts 



DOLAN, PAUL E. 

1 3 Sturgis St., Chelsea, Massachusetts 



FIUMARA, FREDERICK A. 

40 High St., Winchester, Massachusetts 



CURRAN, JOHN R, 

83 Frances St., Portland, Maine 



DONAHUE, JAMES J. 

652 Neponset St., Norwood, Massachusetts 



FLYNN, WILLIAM J. 

66 Lee Rd., Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 



FONTAINE, RONALD C. 

252A F. D. Roosevelt, Halo Rey, Puerto Rico 



HAAK, FABIAN N. 

1 1 3 Gushing Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



JAMIOL, LEONARD J, 

363 Poplar St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



FORD, KENNETH J. 

295 Summit Ave., Brighton, Massachusetts 



HAMLET, STEPHEN PHILLIP 

1 1 7 Wolcott Ave., Syracuse. New York 



JEROME, MICHAEL S. 

90 Newton Ave., Worcester, Massachusetts 



FORD, WILLIAM P.. JR. 

19 Churchill St.. Newtonville. Massachusetts 



HANSCOM, JOHN V. 

6 Grew Hill Rd., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



JOHNSON, D. WOODROW, JR. 

845 Hale St., Beverly Farms, Massachusetts 



FOWLER, ERNEST W. 

2 Dutch Lane Apts. 1 E, Spring Valley, New York 

FREDERICK, JAMES E. 

554 Central Ave., Needham, Massachusetts 

FROHN, JOHN C. 

1 1 Summer St., Lexington, Massachusetts 



HART, JOHN J. 

1 3 Everett St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

HARTEN, JOHN T. 

66 Longfellow Dr., Longmeadow Massachusetts 

HARTIGAN, JOSEPH P 

6 Meadowhank Ave., Mattapan, Massachusetts 



JOURNALIST, JOHN A. 

1 7 Crestdale Rd., Danbury, Connecticut 



KANE, JOSEPH W. 

4 Wyman Court, Winchester, Massachusetts 



KANE, MARTIN W. 

213 M St., S. Boston, Massachusetts 



FRUCCI, RICHARD M. 

35 Elm St., Norwood, Massachusetts 

FULLER, GORDON T. 

34 Marble St., Manchester, Connecticut 

FULLER, RICHARD 

1 4 Middlesex Ave., Swampscott, Massachusetts 

GALLAGHER, HARRY W., JR. 

49 Huntington Rd., Arlington, Massachusetts 

GALVIN, PAUL J. 

58 Kirkwood Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

GAVIN, JAMES F. 

1 24 Ridgewood Rd., Milton, Massachusetts 

GEAGAN, GERALD L 

57 Sunset Rd., Arlington, Massachusetts 

GENEVICH, JOSEPH J. 

51 Pleasant St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

GIGLIO, FRANCIS P. 

1 Hitchcock Ter., Ouincy, Massachusetts 

GILL, JAMES F. Ill 

1 5 Ouincy St., Somerville, Massachusetts 

GINSBURG, ROBERT E. 

206 Park Ave., Revere, Massachusetts 

GORHAM, MICHAEL JAMES 

49 Tolland Rd., North Andover, Massachusetts 

GRANWEHR, MICHAEL W 

1 26 S. Hill Rd., Ridgewood, New Jersey 

GUARENTE, ROBERT V. 

44 Church St., Winchester, Mas^-achusetts 

GUILFOYLE, EDWARD J. 

1 89 Independence Ave., Ouincy, Massachusetts 

GURRY, JOHN F., JR. 

356 Pearl St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 



HAUSER, CHARLES R. 

Old Saugatuck Rd., Norwalk, Connecticut 

HAYES, JAMES P. 

7 Hardy St., S. Boston, Massachusetts 

HAYES, THOMAS J. 

8 Elena St., Mattapan, Massachusetts 

HEAD, JOHN C. 

363 El Greco Dr., Osprey, Florida 

HICE, DOUGLAS J. 

243 Second St., Trenton, New Jersey 

HIGGINS, JOHN P. 

963 Centre St., Newton, Massachusetts 

HINES, ROBERT F. 

64 Moreland St., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

HOARE, JOHN J. 

41 Perthshire Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

HORGAN, DAVID P. 

14 Wellesley Ave., Wellesley, Massachusetts 

HOWARD, WILLIAM F. 

33 Ridgeview Ave., Mattapan, Massachusetts 

HOYLE, JOHN J. 

1 2 Nostrand Ave., Valley Stream, New York 

HOYT, BRENDAN L. 

221 West St., Reading, Massachusetts 

HUBERT, WILLIAM T. 

14 Vine St., Milford, Massachusetts 

HURLEY, STEPHEN G. 

1 57 Palmer St., Ouincy, Massachusetts 

HUTCHESON, JOHN W. 

1 1 Stuyvesant St., Huntington, New York 

HYLAND, ROBERT J 

56 Davis Ave., White Plains, New York 



KANE, RICHARD F. 

4500 NW 25th St., Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 

KEATING, JOHN J. 

27 Glenmont Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

KEEGAN, RICHARD V., JR. 

349 S. Ridgewood Rd., S. Orange, New Jersey 

KEENAN, JOHN J. 

20 Allen St., Arlington, Massachusetts 

KEENAN, JOHN P. 

33 Curve St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

KELLEY, BRIAN H. 

1 85 Tudor Rd.. Needham, Massachusetts 

KELLEY, ROBERT J 

75 South St., Quincy, Massachusetts 

KELLY, JOSEPH P 

1 2 Kerrigan PL, Brookline, Massachusetts 

KENNEDY, FRANCIS M. 

146 Western Ave., Lynn, Massachusetts 

KENNEDY, HAROLD V., JR. 

1 90 Gaylor Rd., Scarsdale, New York 

KERIVAN, WILLIAM R. 

14 Thomson Lane, Lynn, Massachusetts 

KERVICK, JAMES B. 

418 Casino Ave., Cranford, New Jersey 

KINSMAN, FREDERICK 0. 

488 Nahatan St., Norwood, Massachusetts 

KITLOWSKI, CHRIS P. 

6840 Meade St., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

KRAJEWSKI, ALEXANDER H. 
33 Park St., Rockville, Connecticut 

KRASOWSKI, JOSEPH FRANK 
5 Bond St.. Portland, Maine 



KRZYNOWEK, BERNARD J. 

208 Clark St., New Britain, Connecticut 



IVlacDQNALD, ROBERT S. 

301 Eliot St., Milton, Massachusetts 



McHUGH, LEO A. 

523 High St., Medford, Massachusetts 



KUTZ, GORDON R,, JR. 

39 Richmont Ave., Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 



MacNEIL, STEPHEN B. 

8 Stafford St., Dedham, Massachusetts 



MclNNESS, LEO F. 

483 Washington St., Brighton, Massachusetts 



LACHARITE, MARK S. 

9 Ayer Rd., Lawrence, Massachusetts 



MAHONEY, GERARD J. 

305 Summer St., Arlington, Massachusetts 



McKAY, RICARDO A. 

53 South Moison Rd., Blauvelt, New York 



LACOUTURE, WILLIAM J. 

18 Greenwood Rd., Natick, Massachusetts 



MAHONY, DANIEL R. 

3 Cottage Ave., Winchester, Massachusetts 



McKENNA, WILLIAM R. 

251 Country Club Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island 



UMBERT, JOHN J., JR. 

88 Knollwood Rd., Roslyn, New York 



MALLON, DOUGLAS A. 

41 Monument St., Wenham. Massachusetts 



Mclaughlin, james p. 

77 Whitcomb Ave., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



LEEM, NORMAN E., JR. 

35 Sutton Rd., Needham, Massachusetts 



MANION, EDWARD F. 

38 Seminole Drive, Worcester, Massachusetts 



McMACKIN, HUGH J. 

7 1 Pontiac Rd., Quincy, Massachusetts 



LEMBREE, JOHN A. 

167 Nehoiden St., Needham, Massachusetts 



MANNIX, JOHN F. 

4Blithedale St., Newton, Massachusetts 



McMAHON, DANIEL J. 

6 Pleasant St., Kingston, Massachusetts 



LEONARD. JAMES M. 

23 Leiand St., Maiden, Massachusetts 



MARR, DONALD C.,JR. 

1 Glenmont Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 



McMAHON, PAUL M. 

2 Robbern Rd., Hopkinton, Massachusetts 



LEONARD, ROBERT J. 

888 Concord Ave., Belmont, Massachusetts 



MARTO, PETER A. 

1 32 Winsor Ave., Watertown, Massachusetts 



McMANUS, RICHARD J. 

1 32 Minot St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



LEONARD, WILLIAM M. 

25 Berkeley St., Arlington, Massachusetts 



MASCENA, STEPHEN W. 

5 Fox Hill Ave., Bristol, Rhode Island 



McNAUGHT, JOHN J., JR. 

81 Ellis Farm Lane, Melrose, Massachusetts 



LEVINSON, GERALD M. 

3 Lothian Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 



McAULIFFE, KEVIN F. 

2 1 Shiretown Rd., Dedham, Massachusetts 



MILLER, LCREN III 

135 Maple Hill Rd.,Glencoe, Illinois 



LINN, ROBERT D., JR. 

663 Adams St., Milton, Massachusetts 



McCABE, JOHN F 

1 034 East 32nd St., Brooklyn, New York 



MILLONZI, JOEL C. 

82 East Main St., Fredonia, New York 



UPSON, EDMUND 0. 

18 Murray St., Lynn, Massachusetts 



McCARTE, RICHARD F. 

369 Lawrence Rd., Medford, Massachusetts 



MINOR, EDWARD 

269 Elm St., Everett, Massachusetts 



LISTON, EDWARD J. 

46 Mansfield St., Somerville, Massachusetts 



McCarthy, charles j. 

1 1 Wyatt Circle, Somerville, Massachusetts 



MITCHELL, ROBERT K. 

67 Bigelow St., Ouincy, Massachusetts 



LOBIONDO, JOSEPH A 

Box 254, Rosehayn, New Jersey 



McCarthy, eugene j., jr. 

1414 Concord St., Framingham, Massachusetts 



MOONAN, JOHN X. 

21 Joseph St., Medford, Massachusetts 



LOFTUS, PATRICK P. 

14 Lincoln St., Natick, Massachusetts 



McCarthy, john h. 

109 W. Moreland Ave., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



MOORE, ROBERT L 

1 6 Old Colony Drive, Scituate, Massachusetts 



LOGUE, RONALD E. 

Com. 5 Recion Milita, Iquitos, Peru 



McCarthy, roger t. 

40 Orchard St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



MOSES, RICHARD T. 

6 Audubon Drive, Newton, Massachusetts 



LOLI, JAUN M. 

Com. 5, Region Milita, Iquitos, Peru 



McCUEN, BRUCE J. 
2ArdenRd.,Scotia2, NewYork 



MULDOON, EDWARD R. 

1 9 Prospect Ave., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



LOUNEY, JAMES C. 

56 Edgeworth Ave., Portland, Maine 



Mcdonough, george p. 

28 Elm St., Foxboro, Massachusetts 



MULHEARN, DANIEL T., JR. 

1965 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 



LYDON, PAUL T. 

7 Shannon Lane Millis, Massachusetts 



Mcdonough, thomas h. 

163 Ridgewood Rd., Milton, Massachusetts 



MULVEY, MARTIN F. 

78 Normal Hill Rd., Framingham, Massachusetts 



LYNCH, DONALD F. 

69 Sylvia St., Lynn, Massachusetts 



McGOVERN, DAVID S. 

1243 Narragansett Blvd., Cranston, Rhode Island 



MURATORE, JOSEPH R., JR. 

14 Twin Oak Drive, Warwick, Rhode Island 



MacDONALD, JOSEPH P. 

21 Arden Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 



McHALE, WILLIAM 

9 Armistice Blvd., Pawtucket, Rhode Island 



MURPHY, RICHARD E. 

99 Hillside Ave , Ouincy, Massachusetts 



MURPHY. ROBERT G., JR. 

64 Blue Ledge Drive, Rosllndale. Massachusetts 



O'NEIL, DENNIS E. 

1 1 Baxter St.. Westboro. Massachusetts 



RANDO. ROBERT J. 

383 Lexington St., Auburndale, Massachusetts 



MURPHY, WALTER FRANCIS 

73 Jasset St.. Newton, Massachusetts 



O'NEILL, FRANK M. 

41 Pleasant St., Milton, Massachusetts 



RAU. ROBERT J. 

21 Hunting Hill Ave., Middletown, Connecticut 



MURRAY, THOMAS J. 

1 5 Bailey St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

MURRAY, WILLIAM J. 

1 8 Hale St., W. Springfield, Massachusetts 



OSMOND, JOHN P. 

35 Mfingal Rd., Watertown, Connecticut 

PALMER, WILLIAM R. Ill 

290 Red Fox Rd., Stamford, Connecticut 



READY, TIMOTHY F., JR. 

10 Dorset Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 



REARDON, DAVID W. 

1 18 Malvern St., Melrose, Massachusetts 



NOLAN, JOSEPH W. 

234 Court Rd., Winthrop, Massachusetts 



PANAGROSSI, PHILIP 

43 Collett St., Hamden, Connecticut 



REARDON, DENNIS J. 

84 Elm St., Cohasset, Massachusetts 



NOLAN, PAUL J. 

33 Carruth St., Wollaston, Massachusetts 



NOLAN, TERRENCE E. 

19 Luke St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 



NOONAN, THOMAS J.,JR. 

150 Newton St., Brookline, Massachusetts 



PARNOFIELLO, ANTHONY J 

228 Donaldson Ave., Rutherford, New Jersey 



PAUL, DAVID S. 

1 20 Old Acre Rd., Springfield, Massachusetts 



PAUL, MARTIN E. 

83 Putnam Park, Greenwich, Connecticut 



REARDON, RICHARD D 

504 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



REARDON, ROBERT I., JR. 

4 Shawandassee Rd., Waterford, Connecticut 



REGAN, PAUL J. 

9 Linwood St., Medford, Massachusetts 



NOONAN, WILLIAM T. 

1 09 Child St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

NORRIS, WILLIAM H. 

9 Pearl St., Beverly, Massachusetts 

NUGENT, PAUL J. 

31 Ledyard St., Wellesley, Massachusetts 

NURCZYNSKI, ROBERT E. 

2 Dorset Lane, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

O'BRIEN, FREDERICK T. 

47 Bradley Hill Rd., Hingham, Massachusetts 

O'BRIEN, JOHN E. 

20 Quarley Rd., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

O'BRIEN, THOMAS P 

104 Bellevue Ave., Bristol, Connecticut 

O'BRIEN, WILLIAM F. 

76 Wellwood Rd., Portland, Maine 

O'CONNELL, RICHARD C, JR. 

1 1 47 Adams St., Dorchester, Massacuusetts 

O'CONNOR, ROBERT P. 

23 Brookings St., Medford, Massachusetts 

O'CONNOR, THOMAS M 

249 Payson Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 

O'HARE, LAWRENCE P. 

22 Hillside Ter., Belmont, Massachusetts 

O'HARE, RICHARD M. 

22 Hillside Ter., Belmont, Massachusetts 

O'NEIL, CHRISTOPHER V. 

5 School St., Walpole, Massachusetts 



PELLETIER, THOMAS M. 

1 Carrigg Rd., Squantum, Massachusetts 

PETERS, JAMES M., JR. 

1 4 Rice St., Newton Centre, Massachusetts 

PETRUZZIELLO, MICHAEL G. 

1 54 Orangeburgh Rd., Old Tappan, New Jersey 

PEYSER, LAWRENCE J. 

9 Cornell St., Newton Lower Falls, Massachusetts 

PICCIRILLO, NICHOLAS P. 

41 Court St., Newtonville, Massachusetts 

PICKETT, GILBERT J. 

18 Aberdeen Rd., Hingham, Massachusetts 

PIETIG, JOHN F. 
118WestFirstSt., Carroll, Iowa 

PIRRAGLIA, WILLIAM A. 

496 Red Chimney Dr., Warwick, Rhode Island 

PORTER, JAMES C. 

529 Park Ave., Revere, Massachusetts 

POWERS, BRIAN E. 

37 Electric Ave., Lunenburg, Massachusetts 

POWERS, RICHARD E. 

163 Wilkins St., Manchester, New Hampshire 

POWERS, RICHARD F. 

64 Bankside Drive, Huntington, New York 

QUINN, RICHARD M. 

27 Cedar Ave., Arlington, Massachusetts 

RABBITT, PAUL M. 

1 1 1 Grozier Rd., Cambridge, Massachusetts 



RENZELLA, BENNY C. 

26 Rice St., Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 



RESHA, NORMAN M. 

33 Maverick St., Dedham, Massachusetts 



RIDGE, MARTIN S. 

33 Wildwood Ave., Newtonville, Massachusetts 



RISIO, WILLIAM J. 

28 Dale Ave., Quincy, Massachusetts 



ROGERS, MANUEL, JR. 

1010 Cambridge St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 



ROSSI. ALFRED F., JR. 

1 5 Denise Rd., Randolph, Massachusetts 



ROTCHFORD, EDWARD J. 

7 East Main St., Hopkinton, Massachusetts 



RYAN, WILLIAM F. 

22 Briarcliff Terr., Mattapan, Massachusetts 



RYAN, WILLIAM M. 

1 6 Van Ness Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 



SANFORD, LORAN J. 

1 7 Wellesley Park, Dorchester, Massachusetts 



SAND, JOSEPH M. 

28 Mt. Pleasant St., Lynn, Massachusetts 



SARKISIAN, THOMAS M. 

206 Waverly St., Belmont, Massachusetts 



SCALDINI, JOHN J., JR. 

4 Luther Rd., Medford, Massachusetts 



SCARLATA, PAUL F. 

1 30 Furnace Brook Pkwy., Quincy, Massachusetts 



SCHIAPPA, FRAMCESCO J. 

214 School St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

SCHNEIDER, THOMAS H. 

241 West 23rd St., Erie, Pennsylvania 

SCHOENFELD, WILLIAM E. 

1 04 Colby St., Bradford, Massachusetts 

SCIME, GREGORY S. 

77 North Maple Ave., E. Orange, New Jersey 

SCRIBNER, EDWARD A. 

234 Lexington St., Auburndale, Massachusetts 

SELVITELLA. JAMES F. 

31 Hillside Ave., Medford, Massachusetts 

SEMAP, JACK H. 

355 Grove Rd., S. Orange, New Jersey 

SENESI, PAUL MICHAEL 

225 Forest St., Winchester, Massachusetts 

SERGI, ROBERT J. 

7 Fairview Ave., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

SHANLEY, PETER J. 

24 Greenfield St., Lowell, Massachusetts 

SHEA, HENRY A., JR. 

Tremont St., Duxbury, Massachusetts 

SHEA, JOHN G. 

78 Claymoss Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

SHEEHAN, JOHN F. 

1 4 Sunset Rd., Westwood, Massachusetts 

SHEEHY, MICHAEL J. 

26 Chiswick Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

SHERMAN, EDWARD J. 

64 Millstone Rd., Readville, Massachusetts 

SHERRY, WILLIAM T., JR. 

25 Walter St., Lynn, Massachusetts 

SHORES, DAVID W. 

2 1 8 Spring Valley Rd., Darby, Pennsylvania 



SOLERA, JOHN J. 

57 Chickering St., Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

SGSKIN, KENNETH S. 

24 Florence Ave., Rerere, Massachusetts 

SOUSA, FRANK B. 

66 Eastern Ave., Fall River, Massachusetts 

SPARROW, PAUL G. 

160 Washington St., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

SPELLMAN, LEO F. 

47 Greenway North, Forest Hills, New York 

SPENLINHAUER, ROBERT J. 

98 Rutledge Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 

SPIEGEL, MARTIN A. 

107 Kilsyth Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

SPINNEY, JOHN F. 

47 Rossmore Rd., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

STAUNTON, RICHARD M. 

99 Otis St., E. Milton, Massachusetts 

STEARNS, JAMES M. 

2 W. Beechcroft Rd., Short Hills, New Jersey 

STETZ, WILLIAM A. 

3 1 9 Quinlan Drive, Pewaukee, Wisconsin 

ST. GERMAIN, ROBERT E 

1625 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 

STILLMAN, DAVID M, 
164CalebSt., Portland, Maine 

STIRLING, THOMAS G 

37 Shiretown Rd., Dedham, Massachusetts 

SUCKFULL, PAUL S. 

41 Bowker St., Brookline, Massachusetts 

SULLIVAN, EDWARD J 

236 No. Main St., W. Hartford, Connecticut 

SULLIVAN, JAMES T 

1 74 Cherry St. Maiden, Massachusetts 



SWEENEY, DANIEL M. 

3 Virginia Ave., E. Greenwich, Rhode Island 

SWEENEY, WALTER J. 

24 Cameron Rd., Norwood, Massachusetts 

SWIERZ, MITCHELL M. 

35 Granite St., Uxbridge, Massachusetts 

SZECKAS, STEPHEN S, 

55 Kenmere Rd., Medford, Massachusetts 

TALEWSKY, RONALD C. 

46 Gordon St., Somerville, Massachusetts 

TARLIN, IRA 0. 

101 Lanark Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

TAUBER, JEFFREY M. 

1151 Plummet Circle, Rochester, Minnesota 

TERRANOVA. JOHN P. 

10 Spruce Park, Syosset, New York 

THOMPSON, ROBERT P. 

123 Centre St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

TITILAH, RICHARD S. 

78 Beacon St., Arlington, Massachusetts 

TOMASETTI, PAUL A. 

78 Main St., Watertown, Massachusetts 

TGRTO, RICHARD T. 

25 Cherry St., Lynn, Massachusetts 

TORTORELLA, ANTHONY N. 

93 Langley Rd., Brighton, Massachusetts 

TOTO, ROBERT L 

33 Barbara Rd., W. Newton, Massachusetts 

TRAINA, THOMAS P. 

70 Engle St., Tenafly, New Jersey 

TRAVERSE, JOHN H. 

1 9 Ellison Ave., Dorchester, Massachusetts 

TREHY, JOHN R. 

16 Chatham Place, Huntington, New York 



SILVA, ALFRED F., JR. 

39 Buchanan St., Winthrop, Massachusetts 



SKGRKO, JOHN E, 

State Rd., Westminster, Massachusetts 



SLATTERY, ROBERT L 

75 Ocean Drive, Box 234, Humarock, Mass. 



SULLIVAN, JOSEPH P., JR 

1 1 Marathon St., Arlington, Massachusetts 

SULLIVAN, PHILIP J , JR. 

70 Gooch St., Melrose, Massachusetts 

SULLIVAN, WILLIAM C. 

67 Quintard Ter., Stamford, Connecticut 



TWOMEY, DAVID P. 

75 Augustus Ave., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

VANHAREN, FRANCIS B. 

Wittenburgerweg 72, Wassenaar, Netherlands 

VANHORN, RICHARD F 

301 Buckmidster Drive, Norwood, Massachusetts 



SLYNE, KEVIN M. 

92 Manthorne Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

SMITH, FRANCIS B., JR. 

81 Oakeley Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 



SULLIVAN, WILLIAM J. 

1 7 Hancock St., Melrose, Massachusetts 



SULLIVAN, WILLIAM J. 

33 Rogers Ave., Somerville, Massachusetts 



VASILY, MICHAEL W. 

542 Ferry St., Everett, Massachusetts 

VECCHIARELLO, DENNIS A. 

31 Cross St., Somerville, Massachusetts 



VOLNER, ROBERT S. 

37 Kimball Rd., Arlington, Massachusetts 

WALLWORK, ROBERT F^ 

41 Cypress St., Newton Centre, Massachusetts 

WALSH, BRIAN T P. 

1 35 Loring Ave., Salem, Massachusetts 

WALSH, HUBERT M. 

620 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



CODY, CHARLES A. 

1 1 Locust Way, Nahant, Massachusetts 



CONNELLY, JOHN J. 

10 Greenway Rd., Salem, Massachusetts 



CONNOLLY, JOHN P, 

35 Redlands Rd., WestRoxbury, Massachusetts 



CONNOR, MARY E. 

1384 Commonwealth Ave., Allston, Massachusetts 



HENNESSY, BERNARD J, 

1 2 Village Rd., Sudbury, Massachusetts 

HORMANN, ELIZABETH 

1 1 6 Poplar St., Watertown, Massachusetts 

KANE, JOHN D. 

26 Barton St., Somervllle, Massachusetts 

KELLEY, JOHN H. 

178 Central St., Somervllle, Massachusetts 



WANTZ. ROBERT A. 

51 Storer Ave , Pelham, New York 



CONNORS, THOMAS F. 

1 Vogel St., West Roxbury, Massachusetts 



KELLY, JOSEPH D. 

48 Winter St., Watertown, Massachusetts 



WARD, JOHN A. 

10 Kensington Ave,, Jersey City, New Jersey 



DANEHY, JOHN J, 

48 Parsons St., Brighton, Massachusetts 



KILCOMMINS, OWEN M. 

85 Chapel St., Norwood, Massachusetts 



WEARER, CHARLES CJR. 

13 Intervale Rd., Wellesley, Massachusetts 



DAVIS, HERBERT K. 

1666 Comm, Ave., Brighton, Massachusetts 



KILROY, ROBERT W. 

8 Oak St., Winchester, Massachusetts 



WEAFER, RONALD F. 

6 Warren Ave., Woburn, Massachusetts 



OEITSCH, CAROL A. 

1384 Commonwealth Ave., Allston, Mass. 



KIME, JOHN C. 

161 Chestnut St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



WELCH, WILLIAM F. 

Box 323, Sea Island, Georgia 



DeMINICO, NICOLAS 

17 Cleveland PL, Boston. Massachusetts 



KWIATEK, WILLIAM 0. 

14 Fenton Ave., Lynn, Massachusetts 



WEST, PAUL M. 

66 Russett Rd., W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 



DOHERTY, LUCILLE 

51 Blake St., Mattapan, Massachusetts 



LAOD, PAUL F. 

1 5 Massachusetts Ave., Natick, Massachusetts 



WHITESIDE, ROBERT D. 

28 Cherry St., Danvers, Massachusetts 



DOOLIN, ANN M. 

143 Falcon St., Needham, Massachusetts 



LAVELLE, PHILIP B. 

5 Grandville Dr., Franklin, Massachusetts 



WOLF, JAMES A. 

1 1 Gallinson Drive, Murray Hill, New Jersey 



FANNON, ROBERT W. 

1 7 Terrane Ave., Natick, Mass. 



LEAHY, MARGARET M. 

1 5 1 Sherman Rd., Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 



YACKULICS, JOHN J. 

Cioverly Circle, E. Norwalk, Connecticut 



YORK, JEREMIAH F 

235 Mt. Auburn St., Watertown, Massachusetts 



GARDNER, HERBERT W. 

55 East Fairview Ave., Lynnfield, Massachusetts 



GARIN, JEANNE 

12 Anson St., Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



LINDEN, FAY 

60 Kensington Circle, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

LOGAN, FRANCIS H. 

102 Highland Ave., Somervllle, Massachusetts 



ZAK, WILLIAM J. 

132 Radnor Ave., Naugatuck, Connecticut 

evening college 



GARVEY, DANIEL J. 

81 Bacon St., Natick, Massachusetts 



GIOVANNANGELO, FRANCIS 

27 Chester Rd., Belmont, Massachusetts 



LOGAN, JAMES P. 

102 Greaton Rd,, West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

LUCEY, HENRY J 

1 06 Church St., West Roxbury, Massachusetts 



AVERY, RICHARD W. 

1 3 Glenly Terr., Brighton, Massachusetts 



BRUNNER, MAUREEN 

1384 Commonwealth Ave., Allston, Massachusetts 



BUCKLEY, JOHN J. 

20 Dell Ave., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 



BURKE, SHEILA A. 

21 Canterbury Rd., Waltham, Massachusetts 



CALLAHAN, JOHN B. 

76 Granite St., Melrose, Massachusetts 



GREANEY, JOSEPH L., JR. 

19 Union St., Needham Heights, Massachusetts 



GRODEN, CAROL A. 

42 North St., Newton Centre, Massachusetts 



GUILMETTE, HARRIS G. 

37 Irving St., Everett, Massachusetts 



NAJJAR, JEANNETTE 

4 Union Park, Boston, Massachusetts 



HALLIWELL, JOSEPH L, JR. 

1 8 Gladstone St., Wakefield, Massachusetts 



McCarthy, william d. 

44 Worthington Circle, Braintree, Massachusetts 

McEACHERN, JOSEPH C. 

1 55 Lawrence St., Maiden, Massachusetts 

McELHENNY, PATRICIA E. 

66 Phillip Darch Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 

McMAHON, JAMES F. 

1420 River St., Hyde Park, Massachusetts 

McPHERSON, JULIA C. 

62 Turner St., Brighton, Massachusetts 



CIESLIK, JOHN F. 

1 1 Edison Green, Dorchester, Massachusetts 



heaffy, jane M. 

9 Belton St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



MATTHEW, WILLIAM J. 

51 Magnolia St., Arlington, Massachusetts 



MORE, SAM J. 

5 Chester St., North Cambridge, Mass 



TIMMEL, GILDA S. 

2021 Commonwealth Ave., Brighton, Mass. 



CARUSO, JOAN MARIE 

1 1 Crown St., Auburndale, Massachusetts 



O'ROURKE. JOSEPH 

1 Ashmont Park, Oorchester, Massachusetts 



TOTARO, MAOALAINE M. 

317 Langley Rd., Newton Centre, Mass 



CASSIOY, MAUREEN THERESA 

1 Metropolitan Oval, New York, New York 



OUELLETTE, M. ANITA 

98 Collins St., Woonsocket, Rhode Island 



VASEL, JOHN, JR. 

144 Read St., Winthrop, Mass 



CLANCY, MARY E. 

2542 University Ave., Bronx, New York 



PENOER, ROBERT H. 

40 Oakridge St., Oorchester, Mass 



PETRO. ROBERT H. 

51 Belmont St., Cambridge, Mass 



PINDER, PAUL J. 

73 Rockingham Ave., Lowell, Mass 



QUIGLEY, WILLIAM G. 

20 River Bank Rd., Saugus, Massachusetts 



VITALE, JOHN A. 

9 Seven Pines Ave., W. Somerviile, Mass 



WARNOCK, EARL C. 

41 Pleasant St., North Reading, Mass 



graduate nursing 



COLLINS, MONICA MARY 

7 Henry St., Brookline, Massachusetts 



CONNELL, MARY PATRICIA 

10 Garfield Ave., Providence, Rhode Island 



CONNORS, ELIZABETH ANN 

1 09 N. Fourth Ave., Ilion, New York 



COSTAGLIOLA, SR. MARIA REOEMPTA 
30 Warren St., Brighton, Massachusetts 



QUILTY, HUGH R. 

358 East Squantum St.. Salem. Mass 



ANOERSON, RUTH VIRGINIA 

6 Lawson Rd., Winchester, Massachusetts 



COTTER, ANNE MARIE 

23 Pleasant St., Dorchester, Mass 



ROWE, JOHN F, 

4 Gallows Hill Rd., North Ouincy, Mass 



ROY, RONALO G. 

130 Warner St., Manchester, New Hampshire 



SANCLEMENTE, FRANK 

87 Medford St., Medford, Massachusetts 



ARFFA, ELISSA BUDD 

1 5 Pleasant Park Rd., Sharon, Massachusetts 



BABEL, KATHRYN MARY 

32 Prospect Ave., Norwood, Massachusetts 



BARNICLE, MARY F. 

14 Beaufort Ave., Needham, Massachusetts 



DALTON, HANNAH MARIE 

54 McCoy St., Avon, Massachusetts 



OAWSON, KATHLEEN MARY 

1236 White Plains Rd., Bronx, New York 



DECOTEAU, SHEILA ANN 
ParisHill, South Paris, Maine 



SHEEHAN. JOHN J. 

30 Arden Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 



BARRY, MARY LOUISE 

97 Russell St., Everett, Massachusetts 



DIGENNARO, MARIE THERESA 
1712 Edison Ave., New York, New York 



SIMOES, ANTONIO, JR. 

1 6 1 Beacon St., Somerviile, Massachusetts 



BARTA, JUOITH ANN 

82-4 Middlesex Rd., Waltham, Mass 



DOBBIN, MARY JULIANN 

2630 Marion Ave., New York, New York 



SNOW, CAROLYN J. 

1880 Commonwealth Ave , Brighton, Mass. 



STARR, EDITH 

219 Clark Rd., Brookline, Massachusetts 



BELLEVILLE, JEAN ELIZABETH 

78 Deerfield Ave., Waterbury, Connecticut 



BEZAIRE, SR. BERNADETTE 

10 Pelham Rd., Lexington, Massachusetts 



DOONA, MARY ELLEN 

40 Weld Hill St., Jamaica Plain, Mass 



DORAN, KATHLEEN ANN 

47 Grimsted St., Manhasset, LI. 



STENBERG, CAROL G. 

83 Brookside Ave., Newtonville, Mass 



BOURGAULT, SISTER GRACE M. 
Providence Motherhouse, Holyoke, Mass 



DOUGLASS, CHERYL ANN 
Bethel, Maine 



STENBERG, EDWARD B. 

1 Bolster St., Jamaica Plain, Mass 



BOWES, MARGARET 

914 East Fourth St., South Boston, Mass 



DOYLE, KAREN MARIE 
75St. Marys Rd, Milton, Mass 



STETSON, ELINOR R. 

34 Hollis Ave., Quincy, Massachusetts 



BRIDGE, LAURA JANE 

39 Woodland Dr., Greenwich, Connecticut 



DUNN, JEAN MARIE 

52 Stevens Ave., West Long Branch, 



SULLIVAN, FRANCIS G, 

1 Monmouth St., East Boston, Massachusetts 



CALLAHAN, CAROL PATRICIA 

5 Crossway St., Norwich, Connecticut 



ELLARD, PATRICIA 

290 Market St., Brighton, Mass 



SULLIVAN, JAMES J., JR. 

27 Rosedale St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



CAMILLE, BARBARA ANN 

33 Williams Ave., E. Providence, Rhode Island 



FARRELL, MARIAN THERESA 
2460 Davidson Ave., Bronx, New York 



SULLIVAN, MARTIN J. 

88 Tuttle St., Dorchester, Massachusetts 



CAPUANO, CAROL ANN 

89 Upham St., Melrose, Massachusetts 



FARREN, SARAH 

27 Pheasant Hill Dr., Scituate, Mass 



SWISTON, MARIE C. 

3 Barr Rd., West Peabody, Massachusetts 



CAREY, JUDITH 

127 Bathes Ave , Quincy, Massachusetts 



FAUST, MARIE ELLA 

3 Ashland St., Jewett City, Connecticut 



FEEWEY, MARY PAMELA 

33 Coach Rd., E, Setauket, New York 

FLETCHER, DOROTHY ROSE 

227 Locust St , Attleboro, Massachusetts 

FLYNN, CATHERINE E. 

169-1 5 24th Ave , Flushing, New York 

GALLAGHER, THERESA A, (McCARTHY) 
92 Court St., Newtonville, Massachusetts 



JOHNSON, SR. MARY NORMA 
St. Clements Convent, Boston, Mass 



JUDGE, MARY ELIZABETH 

40 Longhill Rd., Ashland, Massachusetts 



KACZMAREK, VIRGINIA ROSE 

10 Catherine St Dudley, Massachusetts 



KEEGAN MARIE HONOR 

34 Hamlet Ave., Woonsocket, Rhode Island 



McHUGH, ESTELLE 

56 Monument St., West Medford, Mass 

McNAMARA, SR. MARIA CONSUELA 
Providence Motherhouse, Holyoke, Mass 

MICHAUD, JANICE ANN 

79 Cliff Ave., Lexington, Massachusetts 

MILLETT, ROSEMARY BRIDGET 
55-03 3 1 St Ave., Woodside, New York 



GALLUP, SR. JANE DWYN SGM 
736 Cambridge St., Brighton, Mass 

GARTLAND, MARY KATHLEEN 

465 Fifth Ave., River Edge, New Jersey 



KELEHER, RITA CHRISTINE 

50 diehard St., E Hartford, Connecticut 



KENNEDY, DATHLEEN ANN 
340 Taylor Ct, Troy, New York 



MILSTEIN, GLORIA ETTA 

234 Jamaicaway, Jamaica Plain, Mass 

MISKELL, CAROLYN JEAN 

1 2 Howard St., Auburn, New York 



GARVEY, SUSAN RUTH 

1403 S. Wanamssa Dr , Asbury Park 

GILLIAM, ELIZABETH REGINA 
25 W. Central St., Natick, Mass 

GRIES, SR. MARY FRANCINE 
1024 Court St., Syracuse, New York 

GUAY, PAULINE 

95 Park Ave., Woonsocket, Rhode Island 



KENNEY, CAROLYN MARY 
57 PearlSt, Melrose, Mass 



KILAR, ARLENE WANDA 

1 283 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 



KUEBELBECK, SR. M. GORETTI 
1406 Sixth Ave., St. Cloud, Minnesota 



LANKIN, PATRICIA 

30 Myrtle St., Pittsfield, Massachusetts 



MORGAN, NANCY MARY 

56 Franklin Hill Ave., Dorchester, Mass 

NACE, SISTER M. JOSEPH 
Providence Motherhouse, Holyoke 

NOONAN, PATRICIA ANN 

22 Peak Hill Rd., West Roxbury, Mass 

O'GARA, ELEANOR FRANCES 
47 LindenSt., Rye, New York 



GUNDERSEN, JUDITH J. 

229 Kelton St., Allston, Massachusetts 



LEMKE, MRS. SHIRLEY ANNE 

26 Hanks St., Lowell, Massachusetts 



OLMSTEAD, GWYNNE 

3879 Orloff Ave, Bronx, New York 



HALTON, SUSAN KAY 

110 Maple Ave., Troy, New York 



LESOFSKY, KATHLEEN MARIE 
61 Jacob St , Dracut, Massachusetts 



O'MALLEY, ROSEMARY AGNES 
1 04 Pearl St., Clinton, Massachusetts 



HANNON. PATRICIA ANNE 

6 1 Homer Ave., Comstock, New York 



LUCAS, JEANNE MARIE 

1 1 Willowdean Ave., West Roxbury, Mass. 



O'NEILL, MARY ROSE 

113 Rockland St., Canton, Mass 



HART, MAUREEN ANN 

1 34 Trinity PL, W. Hempstead, New York 



LUTZ, MARIANNE 

1 7 Bolton Rd., New Hartford, New York 



ORBIE, PAULA ANDREA 

40 Orkney Rd., Apt. 4, Brookline, Mass 



HARTNETT, KATHLEEN PATRICIA 

59 Francis St., Worcester, Massachusetts 



MADDEN, MARY T. 

24 Phillips St., Swampscott, Mass 



PETRALIA, VIRGINIA MARY 
1 67 Palmer St., Arlington, Mass 



HASKELL, SR. MARY M. 

Providence Motherhouse, Holyoke, Mass 



MAHONEY, KATHERINE ANNE 

39 West Town St., Norwich, Connecticut 



PORTELANCE, ROSE MARIE DIANA 
20 South Shore Ave , Peabody, Mass 



HEAFEY, MAUREEN LOUISE 
197 N. Maple St., Florence, Mass 



MARA, SISTER M. JUSTINA 
Providence Motherhouse, Holyoke, Mass 



OUINN, JOHANNE ALICE 

Melody Lane, Pelham, New Hampshire 



HEMPHILL, ELEANOR CLAIRE 
36 Iowa St., Lowell, Massachusetts 



McCANN, JANE MARIE 

26 ChittickRd., Hyde Park, Mass 



RADO, JUDITH ANN 

63 Coen St., Naugatuck, Connecticut 



HIGGINS, MARY ROSE 

4398 Valleyside Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 

HOGAN, ELIZABETH ANN 

Lower Maple St., Hudson Falls, New York 

HYDE, JOANNE MARIE 

1 6 1 Lovell Rd., Watertown, Massachusetts 

JOHANNSSEN, INGEBORG 

Salt Point Tnpk., Pleasant Valley, New York 



McCarthy, Beatrice anne 

94 W. 1 5th St., Bayonne, New Jersey 

Mccarty, elaine edith 

1 6 Beacon Ave., Auburn, Maine 

McELHENNY, ROSEMARY 

6 Myrtle Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

McFADDEN, JEAN ELIZABETH 

8906 9 1 St Ave., Woodhaven, New York 



RIGLER, CAROL RAE 

1107N. 28 St., Billings, Montana 

ROMANCHUK, SR ALICE 

1 Pelham Rd., Lexington, Mass 

ROMANOWSKI, MAUREEN ELAINE 
1 2 South View St., Dorchester, Mass 

ROSSIGNOL, SR. MARIE ROMAINE 
333 Lee St., Brookline, Massachusetts 



ROY, SHIRLEY 

26 St. James Ave., Somerville, Mass 

RYAN, NANCY ELLEN 

566 Fern St., West Hartford, Connecticut 

SHARP, DONNA LOUISE 

249 Beecher Ave., Waterbury, Connecticut 

SKEFFINGTON, CATHRYN AGNES 

2 1 Batchelder St., Melrose, Mass. 

SMITH, BARBARA LYNN 

214-18 29th Ave., Bayside, New York 

SMUDIN, BARBARA 

25 Clarence Ave., Bridgewater, Mass 

SPAGNA, PATRICIA ANN 

23 Edgewook St., Hartford, Connecticut 

STURTEVANT, MARIE HELEN 
16HighSt.,Sabattus, Maine 

SULLA, BONITA JEAN 

578 Bridgewater Ave., Somerville, Mass 

SULLIVAN, ANNE ELIZABETH 
1 36 Silver St., W. Springfield, Mass 

TAYLOR, SHIRLEY JANE 

22 Breakneck Hill Rd., Southboro, Mass. 

TOOHEY, ELEANOR MARIE 

75 Orange St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

WILDONER, MARIE LOUISE 

1 7 E. Fourth St., Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania 

WILLARD, BARBARA 

30 Barnes St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

WONG, PAULENE ANNE 
40 Monroe St., New York, N.Y. 

WOODHOUSE, BETTY F. 

1470 Beacon St., tirookline, Massachusetts 

ZASTAURY, SHIRLEY ANN 

293 Parklawn Dr., Waterbury, Connecticut 

school of nursing 

ANTON, PATRICIA L. 

Avon Lane, Greenwich, Connecticut 

BROWNE, JOAN C. 

1 04 Crest Ave., Revere, Massachusetts 

BURNS, SUSAN E. 

1 12 Valley Rd., Needham, Mass 

CLOCHER, CHRISTINE M. 

7 Elm St., Peabody, Massachusetts 



COAKLEY, CAROL ANN 

21 GretterRd.,W. Roxbury, Mass 

CONNELLY, ELIZABETH A, 
Ironworks Rd., Clinton, Connecticut 

COSTELLO, ANN K. 
4NancyRd., Concord, Mass 

COSTELLO, MARY E. 

1 36 Walworth St., Roslindale, Mass 

CRIMLISK, JANET T. 

4 Pembroke St., Newton, Mass 

DAVIS, MARIANNE T. 

1 87 Broad St., Bloomfield, New Jersey 

DEIANA, CAROL LEE 

231 Mendon St., Hopedale, Mass 

DELANY, MARIE E. 

21 Colton Lane, Shrewsbury, Mass 

DELUCA, CAROL L, 

37 Toilsome Hill Lane, Bridgeport, Conn 

DIGGINS, ELIZABETH A. 

10 Elmira St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

DISCHINO, ALESSANDRINA 

1 03 Raymond Ave., Somerville, Mass 

DOHERTY, ELLEN T. 

36 Winter St., Dorchester, Mass 

DONAHUE, DONNA M. 

26 MacArthur Rd., Wellesley, Mass 

DOWNEY, MARY L. 

1 1 Elm Lawn St., Dorchester, Mass 

DUFFY, MARGUERITE P. 

35 Sunset Circle, Fairfield, Conn 

ELSON, PATRICIA A. 

152 Brown Ave., Roslindale, Mass 

EMOND, ANNE MARIE 

25 Evergreen Ave., Bedford, Mass 

FERGUSON, CARROLL E. 

1 5 Grandview Ave., Watertown, Mass 

FIORENTINO, CAROL 

79 East Main St., Marlboro, Mass 

FLANDERS, SR. SONIA M. 
1 Pelham Rd., Lexington, Mass. 

FOLTS, JOANNE 

89 The Helm, E.lslip, New York 

GABOURY, EMITA T. 

Chiriqui Land Co. Armuelles, Panama 



GALLAGHER, KATHRYN 

5 Andover Rd., Beverly, Massachusetts 

GALLAHUE, ELAINE E. 

3 South Central Ave., Wollaston, Massachusetts 

GALLOGLY, MARY K. 

Northfield Rd., Watertown, Connecticut 

GUDEJKO, VIRGINIA M. 

28 Balcarres Rd., W. Newton, Massachusetts 

HANLEY, ELLEN P. 

88 Hammond St., Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

HENDERSON, JUDITH M. 

172 Lisa Dr., Brockton, Massachusetts 

HORN, ANGELYN M. 

45 Edgewood Rd., Cranston, Rhode Island 

HOSEY, MARGARET M. 

497 Walcott St., Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

HOUDE, KATHERINE H. 

14 Leewood Rd., Wellesley, Massachusetts 

KANE, PAULA 

85 Dale St., Waltham, Massachusetts 

KAYSER, SUZANNE U. 

135 Concord Ave., White Plains, New York 

KELLEY, ELIZABETH A. 

101 Wallace St., Freeport, New York 

KELLEY, MARGARET V. 

35 Lindall St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 

KILLION, RUTH M. 

282 Edge Hill Rd., Milton, Massachusetts 

LISTORTI, JOANNE M. 

71 Waverly St., Everett, Massachusetts 

LOFTUS, SUSAN E. 

1 1 Morningside Dr., Delmar, New York 

MAHONEY, MARY ANN P. 

1 3 Birch St., Ramsey, New Jersey 

MANNING, KATHLEEN M. 

50 Belcher Circle, Milton, Massachusetts 

MARTIN, CATHERINE E. 

6 Beal Rd., Waltham, Massachusetts 

MARTINELLI, DONNA M. 

203 Pleasant St., Bridgewater, Massachusetts 

MARTINO, SHERYL L 

1 1 7 Campbell St., New Bedford, Massachusetts 

MAYR, MARION F. 

81-26 Kent St., Jamaica, New York 



McCABE, CAROL E. 

74 Don Ave., Rumford, Rhode Island 



ROBERTO, DENISE A. 

20922 Aualon Or , Rocky River, Ohio 



SULLIVAN, MGIRA A. 

65 Lenox St., W. Newton, Massachusetts 



McCarthy, patricia r. 

172 Park St., Newton, Massachusetts 



RULLI, MARYANN E. 

39 Brodeur Ave., Webster. Massachusetts 



TESSIER, PRISCILLE R. 

7 Bedel St., Manchester, New Hampshire 



McCRANN, MICHELE C. 

41 Forster St., Hartford, Connecticut 



SCHWOERER. KAREN M. 

R. D. 2 Moseman Ave., Katonah, New York 



THIBEAULT, LORRAINE E. 

1 37 Temple Rd., Waltham, Massachusetts 



MIDDLETON, JOANNE P. 

49 Allendale Rd., Hartford, Connecticut 



SHEA, JUDITH M 

61 Villa St., Waltham, Massachusetts 



TRACY, CHARLENE M. 

92 Hancock St., Bedford, Massachusetts 



MURPHY, JANE E. 

31 Pine Hill Circle, Wakefield, Massachusetts 



SHEA, MAUREEN T. 

73 Seymour St., Roslindale, Massachusetts 



WHOOLEY, CAROLYN T. 

59 Willard St., Dedham, Massachusetts 



MUSKALSKI, MARY-LOUISE 

45 Noble St., W. Newton, Massachusetts 



SPERANDIO, KAREN L 

Concord Country Club, Concord, Massachusetts 



WILSON, JUDITH M. 

1 02 Vreeland Ave., Rutherford, New Jersey 



O'NEILL, EVELYN M 

91 Arlington St., Brighton, Massachusetts 



STEWART, ELLEN 

244 Hamilton Ave., Glen Rock, New Jersey 



WOODS, SR. M. ELIZABETH 

54 Oakes St., Everett, Massachusetts 



PETROCCIONE, MARGARET M. 
425 Colony Ct., Wyckoff, New Jersey 



SULLIVAN, ANNMARIE 

8 Merril Rd., Hull, Massachusetts 



WOODWARD, MARY ANNE 

49 Beal Rd., Waltham, Massachusetts 



RAE, CYNTHIA L 

32 Driftway St., Weymouth, Massachusetts 



SULLIVAN, KATHLEEN M. 

1 74 Cherry St., Maiden, Massachusetts 



BEST WISHES — 

FROM THE 
OFFICERS OF 

LACAROPO 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

THE ROPEL CORP. 



general index 



Academics 

Activities 

Administration 

Alfano, Professor E. 

Arts and Sciences Administration 

Band 

Baseball 

Basketball 

Bellarmine Law and Government Academy 

Boston 

Cataldi in Concert 
C.B.A. Administration 
Class Officers 
Computer Center 
Courtside Club 

Dramatic Productions 
Dramatic Society 

Education Administration 

Education Skits 

Evening School Administration 

Fabens. Professor Augustus 

Faculty Section 

Ferrick, Fr. Robert 

Flanagan. Fr. Joseph 

Football 

Fraternities 

Fulton Debating Soceity 

Gold Key Society 

Golf 

Graduate Section 

Greenhouse 

The Heights 

FligginsHall 

Hockey 

Homecoming Weekend 

Honor Societies 

Hughes, Professor Richard 

Humphrey, Hubert H. 

International Club 

Josephina, Sister 



47 
123 
48 
58 
54 

132 
206 
192 
140 
242 

260 
55 
124 
238 
264 

248 
136 

56 

254 

57 

60 
57 
62 
64 
172 
138 
141 

142 
222 
265 
239 

156 
256 
180 
232 
144 
66 
240 

149 

68 



Junior Week 
Junior Year Abroad 

Knights of Columbus 

Lay Apostolate Program 
Lecturers 

Mendel Club 
Middle Earth 

Nursing School Administration 

Performers 
Political Clubs 
Prologue 
Publications 

Ricci Math Club 

Rifle Team 

Rod and Gun Club 

R.O.T.C. 

Ryan, Miss Eileen 

S.A.B. 

Sailing Team 

Sicilano, Professor Ernest 

Skiing 

Soccer 

Sodalities 

Sports Section 

Student Government 

Table of Contents 

Tennis 

Towers 

Track 

Travers, Professor John 

Underclass Section 
University Administration 
University Chorale 

White, Professor Frederick 

Winter Weekend 

W.R.A. 

Wrestling 

W.V.B.C. 



226 
252 



148 



152 
234 



151 
262 



234 

154 

4 

156 

150 
220 
150 
164 
70 

256 
221 
72 
217 
218 
166 
169 
126 

3 

224 

258 

211 

74 

79 
48 
134 

76 
250 
168 
223 
163 



1967 sub turri staff 



LAYOUT EDITOR LITERARY EDITOR PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 

Charles J. Weschler Marlene A. Gauthier Roger Pelissier 

ACADEMICS EDITOR SENIOR EDITOR 

Anne McGuire Peter F. Bride 

ACTIVITIES EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR 

Raymond Peckham D. Michael Ryan 

FEATURES EDITOR UNDERCLASS EDITOR 

Loren Miller, III Steven McCabe 



LITERARY STAFF 



BUSINESS STAFF 



PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF 



Tony DeLuca 
John Duffy 
Michael Egger 
David Fowler 
Elizabeth Goetz 
Robert Halli 
Charles Lynch 
Donna Martinelli 
Mark Silbersack 
Bruce Thompson 



Jerome Bello 
Donald Joworisak 
Joseph Mariani 
Wayne Marshall 
James McCall 
Tore Scelso 
Gene Therriault 
Bruce Thompson 



Edward Amento 
Joseph Britt 
F. Andrew Finnegan 
John J. Lambert, Jr. 
Joseph Navin 
J. Peter Osmond 
James M. Peters, Jr. 
D. Michael Ryan 



LAYOUT STAFF 



GENERAL STAFF 



TYPISTS 



Al Demers 
Elaine Finnegan 
F. Andrew Finnegan 
Mark Silbersack 



Robert M. Bent 
David Carroll 
Robert Cartwright 
Robert Cunningham 
Mary Wendell Dailey 
Mary Gallogly 
Jeffery Tauber 



Patricia Currie 
Kathleen Dalton 
Nancy Healy 
Julie Mancini 
Ann Marie Young 
Jan Zinno 



The preceding pages of this volume repre- 
sent a re-thinking on the part of the Editorial 
Board concerning what our yearbook has 
been in the past and what it should be here 
and now. We have initiated changes both in 
content and design in order to meet the 
changes of our ever evolving university. It 
is our aspiration that they meet with your 
approval. 

James M. Peters, Jr. 
Editor-in-Chief